thegenealogygirl


23 Comments

52 Ancestors – Mary Brown Wood, Part 2 – So Much Death

deans-2470174_1920

 

A few weeks ago I wrote about my cousin Mary Brown.  She had missing babies.  I can’t ignore missing babies.  I dug and dug and in the end, I found that she had four children who died as infants.  It felt so good to find them and add them to my tree with the details of their short but precious lives.

At one point in my post I wrote:

“Oh, Mary.

How many more babies did you lose?”

That was when I had found three and knew there was still at least one missing.  Four babies lost feels like an overwhelming amount of sorrow for one mother.

I noted that there was more work to do on Mary’s family.  I just didn’t expect that I would write another post about my cousin Mary.  I certainly wasn’t planning on it.

But last week, something kept nagging at me to look at Mary’s family some more.  A few hours in, I was unbelievably heartbroken.  For two days, I dug and scratched, and felt sick to my stomach.  I created a timeline for the entire family and felt even more distressed.

Mary’s story is one of the saddest I have ever uncovered.

 

Her first taste of death.

 

When Mary was just a few months shy of her eleventh birthday, her only older sibling, Andrew Brown, died.  His cause of death was 1 – strumous abscess, 2 – phthisis.  In other words, he died of a cold that originated from tuberculosis, and tuberculosis.1

I am sure that was terribly sad for Mary.  But, she had nine other siblings, both of her parents were alive, and I imagine that life probably moved along okay after some grieving.

 

Mary & William

 

A little more than twelve years later, Mary Brown and William Wood were married.2  Forty-three days later, their first child, Alexander Wood was born, 17 March 1894.3

living child count: 1

Just a few weeks before his first birthday, Alexander died of acute pneumonia.4

living child count: 0

Mary was already expecting her second child when Alexander was buried.  That child, William Wood was born 31 October 1895.5

living child count: 1

A little more than two years later, John Wood was born 20 November 1897.6

living child count: 2

Fifteen months after John’s birth, Mary would say goodbye to her own mother, Janet Lorimer Fulton.  Janet succumbed to uterine cancer after a two year battle on 16 February 1899.7  She was just 48 years old.  Mary was only a few months past her twenty-eighth birthday.

But Mary was about to enter a period of her life that included a presumably welcome respite from loss.  Her next five children would be born without the sorrow of death touching their young family.  First, Hugh Brown Wood in 1900.8  Then Annie Wood in 1902.9  David Wood in 1904.10  Edward Brown Wood in 1907.11  And Alexander Wood in 1910.12

living child count: 7

Alexander only lived for twenty days.  6 May 1910, Alexander Wood died of infantile debility.13  In our day, we call this failure to thrive.  Alexander was not able to absorb nutrition from his food.

living child count: 6

Mary went on to give birth to her second known daughter, Janet Brown Wood, 19 June 1911.14

living child count: 7

At eighteen months of age, Janet died on Christmas Eve 1912 of capillary bronchitis and cardiac failure.15  My marvelous middle boy contracted RSV as an infant.  It was so painful to watch him struggle to breathe.  But I had the wonders of modern medicine to assist me in keeping him breathing.  Mary had to hold her baby, watch her struggle for every breath and see her die in her arms.  At least, that is how I imagine it happening.  Such a heartbreaking picture.

living child count: 6

Eight months later, on 29 August 1913, Mary Wood was born.16

living child count: 7

Mary would only live for seven months.  4 January 1915, Mary died of meningitis.17

living child count: 6

Eight months later another daughter, also named Mary, was born 18 September 1915.18

living child count: 7

Seven short days after Mary’s birth, William Wood, William & Mary’s second born child, perished in the Battle of Loos just before his twentieth birthday on 25 September 1915.19

living child count: 6

Almost two years after William’s death, John Wood, third-born child, was married 8 August 1917.20  I hope the thought of future grandchildren cheered Mary’s heart.

At least for a minute.  Sadly, those grandchildren did not manifest.  John’s wife Ellison went on to marry again on 25 November 1921.21  She was listed as a widow on the marriage record.  Despite extensive efforts to find John’s death record, so far, that record has not been located.  I wonder if he may have decided to join the war efforts after his marriage and perished like his brother.  There are plenty of WWI death records that could be him, but they sadly lack enough detail to be certain.

living child count: 5

A little more than a month after Ellison’s remarriage, Hugh Brown Wood & Martha Blair Dean Boyd were married 31 December 1921.22

Sometime during 1922, Hugh & Martha gave Mary her first grandchild, Agnes Blair Boyd Wood.23

living child count: 5

living grandchild count: 1

 

The beginning of the end

 

The following year, on 22 November 1923,24 Annie Wood lost her life at the age of 21 in the Fever Hospital of Bannockburn.25  Her cause of death?  Phthisis pulmonalis.  Today we would call that pulmonary tuberculosis.  I wonder if Annie’s death reminded Mary of her older brother’s death?  They would have been so similar.

living child count: 4

living grandchild count: 1

Sometime after Annie’s death, Hugh & Martha would have a child named William.  He would later serve as the informant on his own father’s death record,26 but his birth falls in the period where records are not publicly available to view.  I’m hoping his birth brought some joy for Mary.

living child count: 4

living grandchild count: 2

That joy would be interrupted when Edward Brown Wood, just seventeen years old, died in Ochil Hills Sanatorium after a two year battle with pulmonary tuberculosis on 15 February 1925.27

living child count: 3

living grandchild count: 2

For nearly six years, Mary would enjoy another respite from loss.  Until on 14 December 1930, David, at the age of twenty-six, would die of phthisis pulmonalis at home.28  Another death caused by tuberculosis.  If you are counting, this one makes four – three children, one sibling.

living child count: 2

living grandchild count: 2

In early May of 1934, Mary’s youngest daughter would give birth to an illegitimate son named Hugh Brown Wood.

living child count: 2

living grandchild count: 3

Hugh would live for two short weeks before dying of: 1 – prematurity, 2 – congenital debility, and worst of all 3 – pemphigus, on 17 May 1934 at the Royal Infirmary in Stirling.29  Pemphigus is a horrible disease where watery blisters form on the skin.

living child count: 2

living grandchild count: 2

A mere twelve days after the horrors of Hugh’s death, his mother, Mary Wood, youngest child of William & Mary, would also die of phthisis – or tuberculosis – in the home of her parents at the age of 18 on 29 May 1934.30

living child count: 1

living grandchild count: 2

Five deaths to tuberculosis, four of them Mary’s children, one a brother.  Four infant deaths.  One death in battle.  And one unknown cause of death.  At least eleven children were born to Mary Brown & William Wood.  Mary & William would lose ten – TEN! – of those children during their lifetimes.  Only two of their children would marry.  They would have only three known grandchildren.  I feel so numb when I consider the sheer number of deaths Mary experienced.  Horrible, painful deaths.

There would again be a rest from death for a time.  There would even be a few bright spots in Mary’s family despite the fact that WWII was raging.  24 April 1942, Mary’s granddaughter Agnes Blair Boyd Wood & Andrew Wilson were married very near Mary’s home.31  Two years later, Agnes & Andrew would welcome their first child, a girl.  A girl who is now an older woman.  A LIVING, older woman.

living child count: 1

living grandchild count: 2

living great-grandchild count: 1

 

One last death

 

Four years later, Mary would lose her husband of fifty-four years, William Wood, on 31 July 1948.32  His cause of death was listed as “senile changes”.  Merciful?  Possibly.

Mary Brown would live for nearly seven years without her husband.  Seven years with only ONE of her eleven children.  But seven years with the hope of a future for her posterity as those 3 precious grand, and great-grandchildren continued to LIVE.

1955 began in sorrow for Hugh Brown Wood as his mother Mary died on 1 January in his home.33  Just like her husband William, Mary’s cause of death is listed as “senile changes”.  Merciful?  I hope so.  I would not normally feel peace about the indignity of death to Alzheimers/dementia, but in Mary’s case, I hope she was transported back to that decade of joy when her family only grew and she had 7 children living.  I hope that on her bad days, Hugh & Martha never reminded her of the tragedies she experienced over and over and over again.  I hope they let her live blissfully in any happy memories she found in those last days.

A little more than two years after Mary’s death, her only child to outlive her, Hugh, would die of coronary thrombosis on 11 April 1957.34  I am so glad for Mary’s sake, that Hugh’s heart held out until after Mary had passed.

 

Grappling to understand

 

How did one woman survive so much loss?

I cannot begin to imagine what that was like.

I feel raw.  The realization of the sorrows of Mary’s life is new for me.  Her pain ended more than 62 years ago, but I discovered one horrifying record after another in very quick succession.  Every part of me aches for Mary.  I will probably ache for a while.  But I imagine she made peace with it all either near the end of her life or in her joyous – and LARGE – reunion after her death.

I don’t want Mary to feel even a moment more of the pains of her life, but I hope that she knows I am feeling pain for her suffering.  I hope she knows that I discovered not only her missing babies, but also the immense sorrow of her many, many losses.  I don’t know what it feels like to be in Heaven, but if my telling of her story brings anything to her today – I hope it is a sense of being loved, understood, honored, respected, and revered.

Mary now holds a very special place in my heart.  I will carry her with me for all of my days.

 

My very dear cousin Mary, I hope you are experiencing peace and joy you could never have anticipated during your painful journey through mortality.

 

 

 

note: It is possible that William and Mary had additional children, grandchildren, and great-grandchildren.  They have been carefully searched for and not found.  Grandchildren and great-grandchildren are more difficult to identify without the help of living descendants.  If you are a descendant of Mary, I welcome your input and contact – amberlysfamilyhistory {@} yahoo {dot} com.

 

 


  1. Scotland, “Statutory Deaths 1855-2016,” database, Scotlands People (http://www.scotlandspeople.gov.uk : accessed 14 July 2009), death entry for Andrew Brown, 25 September 1881, Hamilton in Lanark; citing Statutory Registers no. 647/00 0351. 
  2. Scotland, “Statutory Marriages 1855-2017,” database, Scotlands People (http://www.scotlandspeople.gov.uk : accessed 7 January 2018), marriage entry for William Wood and Mary Brown, 1894, Bothwell in Lanark; citing Statutory Registers no. 625/1 4. 
  3. Scotland, “Statutory Births 1855-2017, ” database, Scotlands People (http://www.scotlandspeople.gov.uk : accessed 7 January 2018), birth entry for Alexander Wood, 1894, Bothwell in Lanark; citing Statutory Registers no. 625/1 90. 
  4. Scotland, “Statutory Deaths 1855-2017,” database, Scotlands People (http://www.scotlandspeople.gov.uk : accessed 7 January 2019), death entry for Alexander Wood, 1895, Bothwell in Lanark; citing Statutory Registers no. 625/1 41. 
  5. Scotland, “Statutory Births 1855-2017,” database, Scotlands People (http://www.scotlandspeople.gov.uk : accessed 31 January 2018), birth entry for William Wood, 31 October 1895, Bothwell in Lanark; citing Statutory Registers no. 625/1 393. 
  6. Scotland, “Statutory Births 1855-2017,” database, Scotlands People (http://www.scotlandspeople.gov.uk : accessed 31 January 2018), birth entry for John Wood, 20 November 1897, Cowie near Bannockburn in Stirling; citing Statutory Registers no. 488/02 0151. 
  7. Scotland, “Statutory Deaths 1855-2016,” database, Scotlands People (http://www.scotlandspeople.gov.uk : accessed 14 July 2009), death entry for Janet Brown, 16 February 1899, Bothwell in Lanark; citing Statutory Registers no. 625/01 0050. 
  8. Scotland, “Statutory Births 1855-2017,” database, Scotlands People (http://www.scotlandspeople.gov.uk : accessed 31 January 2018), birth entry for Hugh Brown Wood, 14 July 1900, Cowie, near Bannockburn in Stirling; citing Statutory Registers no. 488/2 114. 
  9. Scotland, “Statutory Births 1855-2016,” database, Scotlands People (http://www.scotlandspeople.gov.uk : accessed 8 January 2018), birth entry for Annie Wood, 1 September 1902, Cowie in Bannockburn in Stirling; citing Statutory Registers no. 488/2 171. 
  10. Scotland, “Statutory Births 1855-2016,” database, Scotlands People (http://www.scotlandspeople.gov.uk : accessed 30 January 2018), birth entry for David Wood, 27 October 1904, Cowie near Bannockburn in Stirling; citing Statutory Registers no. 488/2 219. 
  11. Scotland, “Statutory Births 1855-2017,” database, Scotlands People (http://www.scotlandspeople.gov.uk : accessed 31 January 2018), birth entry for Edward Brown Wood, 20 September 1907, Cowie, near Bannockburn in Stirling; citing Statutory Registers no. 488/2 285. 
  12. Scotland, “Statutory Births 1855-2017, ” database, Scotlands People (http://www.scotlandspeople.gov.uk: accessed 7 January 2018), birth entry for Alexander Wood, 1910, St Ninians in Stirling; citing Statutory Registers no. 488/1 134. 
  13. Scotland, “Statutory Deaths 1855-2017,” database, Scotlands People (http://www.scotlandspeople.gov.uk : accessed 7 January 2019), death entry for Alexander Wood, 1910, St Ninians in Stirling; citing Statutory Registers no. 488/1 53. 
  14. Scotland, “Statutory Births 1855-2017,” database, Scotlands People (http://www.scotlandspeople.gov.uk : accessed 7 January 2019), birth entry for Janet Wood, 1911, St Ninians in Stirling; citing Statutory Registers no. 488/1 252. 
  15. Scotland, “Statutory Deaths 1855-2017,” database, Scotlands People (http://www.scotlandspeople.gov.uk : accessed 7 January 2019), death entry for Janet Brown Wood, 1912, St Ninians in Stirling; citing Statutory Registers no. 488/1 166. 
  16. Scotland, “Statutory Births 1855-2017, ” database, Scotlands People (http://www.scotlandspeople.gov.uk : accessed 7 January 2018), birth entry for Mary Wood, 1913, St Ninians in Stirling; citing Statutory Registers no. 488/1 356. 
  17. Scotland, “Statutory Deaths 1855-2017,” database, Scotlands People (http://www.scotlandspeople.gov.uk : accessed 7 January 2018), death entry for Mary Wood, 1915, St Ninians in Stirling; citing Statutory Registers no. 488/1 2. 
  18. Scotland, “Statutory Births 1855-2017,” database, Scotlands People (http://www.scotlandspeople.gov.uk : accessed 7 January 2019), birth entry for Mary Wood, 1915, St Ninians in Stirling; citing Statutory Registers no. 488/1 347. 
  19. https://www.cwgc.org/find-war-dead/casualty/737696/wood,-william/ 
  20. Scotland, “Statutory Marriages 1855-2016,” database, Scotlands People (http://www.scotlandspeople.gov.uk : accessed 27 January 2018), marriage entry for John Wood and Ellison Lough, 18 August 1917, Plean near St Ninians in Stirling; citing Statutory Registers no. 488/01 0039. 
  21. Scotland, “Statutory Marriages 1855-2016,” database, Scotlands People (http://www.scotlandspeople.gov.uk : accessed 27 January 2018), marriage entry for Peter Wilson Lister and Ellison Hutchison Wood, 25 November 1921, Cowie near St Ninians in Stirling; citing Statutory Registers no. 488/01 0076. 
  22. Scotland, “Statutory Marriages 1855-2016,” database, Scotlands People (http://www.scotlandspeople.gov.uk : accessed 31 January 2018), marriage entry for Hugh Brown Wood and Martha Blair Dean Boyd, 31 December 1921, Falkirk in Stirling; citing Statutory Registers no. 479/ 13. 
  23. The actual record for this birth is too recent to purchase and view, but the item is easily located on Scotlands People because of the uniqueness of the name: WOOD AGNES B BOYD F 1922 488/1 186 St Ninians. 
  24. Scotland, “Statutory Deaths 1855-2017,” database, Scotlands People (http://www.scotlandspeople.gov.uk : accessed 28 January 2018), death entry for Annie Wood, 22 November 1923, Bannockburn near St Ninians in Stirling; citing Statutory Registers no. 488/1 108. 
  25. http://www.scottish-places.info/features/featurefirst89859.html 
  26. Scotland, “Statutory Deaths 1855-2016,” database, Scotlands People (http://www.scotlandspeople.gov.uk : accessed 31 January 2018), death entry for Hugh Brown Wood, 11 April 1957, Bannockburn, near St Ninians in Stirling; citing Statutory Registers no. 488/1 30. 
  27. Scotland, “Statutory Deaths 1855-2016,” database, Scotlands People (http://www.scotlandspeople.gov.uk : accessed 31 January 2018), death entry for Edward Brown Wood, 15 February 1925, Orwell in Kinross; citing Statutory Registers no. 463/ 5. 
  28. Scotland, “Statutory Deaths 1855-2016,” database, Scotlands People (http://www.scotlandspeople.gov.uk : accessed 30 January 2018), death entry for David Wood, 14 December 1930, Plean in Stirling; citing Statutory Registers no. 488/1 104. 
  29. Scotland, “Statutory Deaths 1855-2016,” database, Scotlands People (http://www.scotlandspeople.gov.uk : accessed 31 January 2018), death entry for Hugh Brown Wood, 17 May 1934, Stirling in Stirling; citing Statutory Registers no. 490/ 161. 
  30. Scotland, “Statutory Deaths 1855-2016,” database, Scotlands People (http://www.scotlandspeople.gov.uk : accessed 31 January 2018), death entry for Mary Wood, 29 May 1934, Fallin near St Ninians in Stirling; citing Statutory Registers no. 488/1 77. 
  31. Scotland, “Statutory Marriages 1855-2016,” database, Scotlands People (http://www.scotlandspeople.gov.uk : accessed 31 January 2018), marriage entry for Andrew Wilson and Agnes Blair Boyd Wood, 24 April 1942, Stirling in Stirling; citing Statutory Registers no. 490/ 108. 
  32. Scotland, “Statutory Deaths 1855-2016,” database, Scotlands People (http://www.scotlandspeople.gov.uk : accessed 31 January 2018), death entry for William Wood, 31 July 1948, Fallin near St Ninians in Stirling; citing Statutory Registers no. 488/1 69. 
  33. Scotland, “Statutory Deaths 1855-2017,” database, Scotlands People (http://www.scotlandspeople.gov.uk : accessed 7 January 2019), birth entry for Mary Wood, 1955, St Ninians in Stirling; citing Statutory Registers no. 488/1 1. 
  34. Scotland, “Statutory Deaths 1855-2016,” database, Scotlands People (http://www.scotlandspeople.gov.uk : accessed 31 January 2018), death entry for Hugh Brown Wood, 11 April 1957, Bannockburn, near St Ninians in Stirling; citing Statutory Registers no. 488/1 30. 


11 Comments

Photograph Showcase: Kate & Bill – for just 5 years

 

img002 - edited, smaller

William Joseph Millan & Catherine Boles Young

Kate & Bill were both born in Scotland.  Bill arrived in the US first in 1907 when he was just 19 years old.  Kate arrived in 1910 when she was 11 years old.  They married on 4 September 1918 in Montana.  I imagine this photo was taken near that time.  What a beautiful portrait.  I love Kate’s dress!

Two years after they were married, Kate & Bill welcomed their only child into the world, Catherine Lucille Millan.  Young Catherine was born in Montana.  Kate would only live for three more years before succumbing to tuberculous meningitis on 18 July 1923.  She died just a few months shy of her 24th birthday and her 5th wedding anniversary.

Life can be bitterly unfair at times.  She served as a nurse, we believe during WWI.  She was my great grandmother’s only sister.  She was a daughter, a wife, a mother.  People loved her, needed her, and yet, she passed from this life too soon.

William would go on to struggle for many, many years.  He was not able to care for Catherine Lucille as a single dad working in the mines.  So, she was bounced around between relatives.  Eventually, she would marry and have three children of her own.

This photograph is one of very few remnants of Kate’s short life.  I hope her small posterity will find it here and treasure it.

 

img002, smaller

Here is the original scan.  The handwriting in blue ink is Aunt Barbara’s, and the writer of the penciled words is unidentified.  This photo was loaned to me by Aunt Barbara to scan.  I am so glad.  I did have a previous scan of this photo that was done on an all-in-one scanner several years ago.  It wasn’t nearly as detailed as this version.  Notice the photographers mark in the bottom right as seen below:

img002 - edited, studio name

 

 

Happy Thursday, I hope you make a wonderful photo discovery this week!

 

 


20 Comments

Photograph Showcase: In Uniform

 

DUVAL, Francis Cyprien on boat

Francis Cyprien Duval, on far right

Francis Cyprien Duval is my 2nd great grandfather.  He was born 3 October 1863 in Rimouski, Québec, Canada.  He was the first in our direct line to leave Québec after settlement from France.

Francis was an adventurer.  He was in Dawson, Alaska before the Gold Rush began.  He stayed throughout and did well.  He tried his hand at homesteading in Fairbanks.  He moved his wife and children back and forth between Alaska and California for many years.

Sometime after the death of his father-in-law, Henry Hyde, in Fairbanks in 1907, Francis and his family moved to Vancouver, BC and then finally settled in Lynn Valley, BC.

He lied about his age and joined the Canadian Expeditionary Forces during WWI.  That didn’t last long before he was sent back home.

He went on to work as a Forest Ranger.  He continued in that work until the time of his death at age 55 on 31 May 1919 in Vancouver, BC.

This photo is one of very few photos of Francis.  There are no notations on the back.  Based on what I know of Francis’ life, I would guess that this was taken during his service in WWI.  I did some google searching and his hat and collar seem to match the images of the uniforms during this time.

Francis died before he was a grandfather.  I descend from his son Francis Henry Duval.  Francis Henry was the father of two children – my Grandma Deane, who recently died, and my Grand Uncle Frank.

During the last two days of my Grandma’s life, the family gathered at her side.  In my conversations with Uncle Frank, he expressed disappointment that he hadn’t thought to ask his Dad about his Grandpa.

So, Uncle Frank, this one’s for you.

 

 


15 Comments

Dear Genealogy Bloggers, I love you!

I heart genealogy bloggers

For several weeks now I have been wanting to send a big thank you to two bloggers.  Randy Seaver of Geneamusings and Gail Dever of Genealogy à la carte.

Randy regularly posts lists of new and updated record collections.  These are not the blog posts I usually spend much time on.  (No offense Randy, I’m just a busy mom with a preschooler still at home…)  But for some reason, I started reading them more carefully lately.  Well, on May 12th he posted a list of new records available on FindMyPast.  Among the many collections was “National School Admission Registers & Log-Books 1870-1914.  He noted that, “Over 34,000 York School records have been added…” to that collection.

Guess who lived in York?

My Hyde family.  Including Robert and Rosey.

Now, I have looked through the indexed school records available on Sheffield Indexers and found several records for my Hyde family.  But I thought I’d give it a look and see what was there.

Guess what?

There were SEVERAL records for my Hyde family on FindMyPast that have not yet been indexed on Sheffield Indexers.  And even better – there are images!

Like this one:

HYDE, Muriel Grace, 1909 to 1910 School Record

Do you know what that is?!

It’s a record of Muriel Grace Hyde, Rosey and Robert Hyde’s oldest daughter, being enrolled, and re-enrolled, and removed, and removed again from the Western Road Infants School in Sheffield, Yorkshire, England.  This means that I have several more dates for my timeline.  Yippee!!

Thank you Randy!

 

Now let’s talk a little bit about Gail.

Gail also posts quite often about new collections and other genealogy news.  On May 16th, she posted about an update to the WWI Canadian Expeditionary Force service files.  If you remember, that very collection gave me a hint of Norma.  And from there, well, the ensuing research took me on a crazy trip down the rabbit hole.

But here’s the thing.  My 2nd great grandfather, Francis Cyprien Duval, was also a member of the Canadian Expeditionary Forces.  I had looked for his file before.  A few times.  After all of the “D”s were supposedly indexed.  I never found it.  But when I read Gail’s post I thought I’d give it another try anyway.  Just in case.

And there it was!

In all it’s full color, 66 page glory.  It was very enlightening.  I thought Frank stayed in Canada doing work at home during his service.  He did not.  In fact, he lied about his age so he could join up and head overseas.  He was too old, so he fudged it.  I was so surprised by that.  He claimed to be 44 years and 4 months old when he enlisted.  A mere 8 months younger than the upper age limit of 45.  It didn’t work out for him though.

On page 58 there is this telling note from the doctor:

Screen Shot 2017-06-05 at 9.03.12 PM

“Is 54 years old and looks it.”  Hmmm, did he age considerably during the short time he was enlisted?  I mean visually.  Because just shortly before this note was written he got away with saying he was 44.  😉  There are so many cool details in this file.  It is awesome.

I have no idea why I never found it before.  I don’t know if it was indexed out of order and published well after the other “D” surnames or if I didn’t search carefully.  (That is soooooo not like me, but maybe I was distracted?)  Either way, I am very glad I read Gail’s post and decided to give it another look.

Thank you Gail!

 

So.  What is the lesson in all of this?  There are two.

First, I really love genealogy bloggers!  I think we are the friendliest bunch of bloggers out there.  We share our great finds, our search strategies, awesome websites and collections, cool stories, brick walls, research woes and wonders, and so many other tid-bits.  We all make the genealogy experience SO. MUCH. BETTER. for everyone.

And second, I will never again skip a “see what’s new at such-and-such website” post.  🙂

 

What do you think?  Do you love genealogy bloggers too?  Well if you do, share a little love today and thank your genealogy blogger friends.  Because they are just plain awesome!  ❤

 

 


10 Comments

Memorial Day Tribute – James Boles

photo 4

My marvelous middle child, Memorial Day 2014

Today is Memorial Day in America.  A day to honor those who died in service to our country.  A day to remember those who made the ultimate sacrifice for our freedom.

For many, it has become the kick off to summer – a day for barbecuing and playing outside.  I suppose that even those who fail to remember the price that was paid for their freedom, are still a tribute to the bravest among us.  The whole idea behind defending liberty is so that there can be a peaceful place for families to live and work and play together.  A place of freedom.  Freedom to remember or not.

Today, I choose to remember.

Earlier this year I discovered another family member who died during military service.

James Boles.

James wasn’t an American.  He was born in Scotland.  At the tender age of three, James left his homeland bound for South Africa with his siblings.  He and his family were seeking a better life.

As a young, unmarried man, James drew up a will.  In simple terms, he left everything to his parents.  James was heading back to Europe.  This time it wasn’t to improve his own life.  It was to fight for the freedom of others in the Great War.  James was part of the 4th South African Infantry.

On the 13th of April 1918, James was killed in action in Flanders.

Today, I honor and remember my cousin, James Boles.

James, thank you for your service.

 

James Boles – my 1st cousin, 4 times removed.  Born – 11 October 1887 in Dalserf, Lanark, Scotland to John Thompson Boles and Christina Montgomery.  Brother to: Agnes, James, Isabella, Christina, William, Helen, Elizabeth, John, Agnes, John, and Alice.  Died – 13 April 1918 in Flanders.

 

Rest in peace dear cousin.  I will think of you today as I post small flags on the graves of veterans close to home.

 

H - Memorial Day 2014

My Littlest Sweetheart, Memorial Day 2014

 

 


16 Comments

Incest?! – An Update: ALWAYS Go To The Next Image!

Whiteley - Hyde

Yep, it’s that image again.

Last week I begged for your help to disprove my theory of incest.  My friend Cathy commented, “The biggest sore thumb I noticed was – who is Norma?”

Exactly?!  Who is Norma.  I had already tried a bunch of things and just couldn’t find her.  But after Cathy asked the same question I was asking, I decided I really needed to find her.  I rededicated myself and used all of my fancy, sneaky, super-smart search strategies and I got a whole lotta nothin’.

But give me a puzzle and I just can’t stop.  So I revisited everyone in that matrimonial mess.  I found a lot more info – but nothing that answered my core question: Were Robert & Rosey Hyde husband and wife, AND uncle and niece?

The one thing I did find was a hint of Norma.  And I found it in an unlikely place.  A WWI Canadian Expeditionary Forces Personnel File.

But the really important part…

The absolutely CRITICAL part…

The it-would-have-been-super-easy-to-miss-Norma-completely part…

Norma showed up on page 50 of the file.

That’s right – page number FIVE-OH.

After a whole lotta nothin’, suddenly, there was Norma.

Thankfully I learned the lesson many years ago that many records have more than one page.  Some records have more than two pages.  And occasionally you will find a record that is a whopping 67 pages long – like the one that gave me a hint of Norma.

Now you probably want to know what exactly I learned about Norma.

And you probably want to know what else I learned about that mess up there.

Here’s the thing – it’s so complicated that my poor brain is still trying to sort it all out.  My poor brain is trying to figure out how to even begin to explain what I have learned.

So for now, let me just say that Norma exists.  She appears to be a sister of Rose Elvera Hyde Williamson.  I know her approximate birthdate.  And I know who two of her possible parents are.

The rest is going to have to wait until I can find the words.  And it’s going to take more than one post.  Because that family up there is a whole mess of crazy.

But my dear friends, this is what I want to leave you with today:

When you are looking at an image on any website – always click to the next image.  And then keep right on clicking until you come to an image that is about someone else.  The longest record I have ever found was 137 pages.  It was also a WWI record.

This WWI Canadian Expeditionary Forces Personnel File was BORRRRRRING!  And I like LOVE old records.  But it just kept saying the same things over and over and over.

Until it didn’t.

Until it told me that Norma exists.  That she is part of my family.

So whatever you do today in your genealogical endeavors, PLEASE, for the love of Norma, CLICK TO THE NEXT PAGE!

More updates on Incest?! coming next week.