thegenealogygirl


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Photograph Showcase: The First Image From A Precious Collection

costello08 - cropped, lightened - 2x, and sharpened - smaller 6000

This beautiful family portrait was given to me by my Grandma several years ago.  It is an 11×17″ photo of my Grandma, my mother, and my mother’s siblings.  My darling Mom is wearing the blue striped dress.

This portrait was one of many in a large Kodak envelope.  All of the photos were taken by my Great-Grandmother Estelle Duval at her studio – Duval Portraits in Spokane, Washington.  Most of the photos in this envelope were hand colored with oil paints by Grandma Duval.  She was remarkably talented.

For the past several years – maybe 7 or so – these photos have been patiently waiting for some attention.  Well, two weeks ago when I scanned the Telesphore Brouillette book, I also scanned all 28 of the 11×17″ portraits.

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It felt pretty fantastic to finally get these treasures scanned.  I just needed some time and access to a large, high-quality flat-bed scanner.  Thank you, BYU for helping me out!

The only bummer, and it is a very slight bummer, is that many of these precious photos were printed on textured paper.  The scans exaggerate the texture and the photos come out much darker than they really are.  Here is the original scan:

costello08 - cropped - smaller

And here it is lightened up a bit:

costello08 - cropped, lightened - smaller

And here it is with a little bit of sharpening:

costello08 - cropped, lightened, and sharpened - smaller

And then finally, with some more sharpening and another layer of lightening:

costello08 - cropped, lightened - 2x, and sharpened - smaller 6000

Which version appeals most to you?

 

I am sooooo happy to have finally scanned these treasures!

 

 

Happy Thursday, I will be enjoying lots of family time next week for Thanksgiving.  I’ll be taking the week off.  If you are also celebrating Thanksgiving, may I suggest that you spend some time preserving memories?  The FamilySearch Memories app is free and a fantastic way to record audio.  It can record segments up to 15-minutes in length.  Get your family talking about their favorite memories of loved ones now gone and record those gems.  Have the Google PhotoScan app ready to go so you can scan any photos that catch your eye.  Remember, the app isn’t nearly as good as a scanner, but sometimes, it’s the only thing you’ve got.  I hope you have a blessed and thankful week!  I am thankful for each of you who make my genealogy experience so much richer.  xoxo

 

 


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Photograph Showcase: Ronald Peterson, age 31

PETERSON, Ronald, 31 years old portrait

This is my Grandpa, Ronald Skeen Peterson, in 1957 at the age of 31.

Two years later he was hired by Utah State University as a counselor.  He would very shortly be made head of the department.  He taught abnormal psychology while running the counseling and testing department for the remainder of his years at USU.

Prior to his hire by USU, he worked as a counselor at the University of Oregon where he completed his PhD work in psychology.

I wonder if this lovely portrait was taken for the University of Oregon or on the occasion of his graduation?  I need to nail down the dates of a few things and I might be able to make a more accurate guess.

Either way – it’s a beautiful photo.  It has a rather large orangish-brown stain across his forehead and off to the side.  It cleaned up nicely in photoshop.  Ahhhhh photoshop, a photo preservers best friend.  😉

 

 


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Photograph Showcase: Finding the Original of a Favorite Photo

PETERSON, Ronald as young boy in front of house - smaller

I LOVE this darling little photo of my Grandpa from 1931.  I love his happy smile, that jaunty tie, and the cute little tip of his ankle.  I’ve seen this photo in several places – my dad’s Book of Remembrance created by his mother, my Grandma’s Book of Remembrance, and in bundles of favorite photos that my Grandma made copies of for loved ones.  This is a well known photo for me.

I was sooooo delighted to find the original of this precious photo.  The color difference was a bit hard for me to adjust to.  So I played with a few filters in Photoshop.  Which do you like best?

PETERSON, Ronald 1931

The original – there is some discoloration seen throughout the photo.

PETERSON, Ronald 1931 - b&w

This filter is called “Black and White Beauty”.

PETERSON, Ronald 1931, pw b&w

This filter is called “Pioneer Woman Black & White”.

PETERSON, Ronald 1931 - l&e

This filter is called “Lovely and Ethereal”.

I don’t normally use photo filters on old family photos.  But something about the state of this photo seemed to call for a little editing.  Which do you like best?  How do you feel about filters and old family photos?  Are you a photo purist?  I like to edit out scratches, tears, dust, and other damage, but I usually leave the color alone, unless it is orange from an old magnetic album.  The orange is too much for me to leave alone.

 

Happy Thursday, I hope you make a delightful photo discovery today!

 

All filters are courtesy of the Pioneer Woman and can be found here.

 

 

ps – You may have noticed my absence in reading, commenting, and responding these last few weeks.  I have been on a WILD and rewarding DNA ride that I hope to be able to tell you all about one day.  Let’s just say, when they warn you that when you DNA test you might find a family secret – well, I can now attest to that being completely true.

 


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Photograph Showcase: Blanche as a Young Girl

HUBAND, Blanche Octavia, young girl

Blanche Octavia Huband

This lovely photo is my great grandmother Blanche Octavia Huband.  It comes from an album page created by her daughter, my grandmother, Mary Margaret Ellis.  Blanche looks like such an interesting little girl – confident but a touch reserved.  She is definitely a beauty.

As I was editing this photo I considered a few questions for myself:

  1.   When should I edit a photo and when should I leave it as is?
  2.   Do I spend too much time editing too many photos of each person?
  3.   Will photo editing improve so significantly in the future that it would be better to wait to edit?

I don’t know the answers.  Just some questions kicking around in my brain.  Here is the original.  What do you think?

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