thegenealogygirl


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Advice Please ❤️

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I have finished filing thousands of precious letters between my grandparents, as well as letters from my great grandparents, extended family, and friends to my Grandpa during WWII and my grandparent’s respective missions.

I have begun scanning and transcribing.  What a joy!

But I am struggling with a few decisions.

Should I post the letters here or on their own blog?  I haven’t counted the letters, but there are thousands.  If I post them here, how should I alter my posting schedule?

Should I include everything?  My Grandma wrote the word destroy on a few of the envelopes.  You see, she inadvertently “Dear John”ed my Grandpa and was extremely embarrassed by that.  It wasn’t something she talked about.  Ever.  But my Grandpa told me all about it.  How do I handle those letters with respect to both my Grandma’s feelings and honoring the truth of their story?  (I really don’t think she had a reason to be embarrassed, it all worked out just fine in the end.)

Then there are a few letters written by Grandpa’s friends that don’t exactly paint the letter writers in the best light.  Do I include those?

Oh boy!  So many decisions.

So, I have a little survey here with these questions.  Feel free to answer on the survey or in the comments or both.  I would love any feedback that might help me choose a path forward.

 

Thank you!

 

 

 


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Photograph Showcase: Grandma Costello’s Art

COSTELLO, Mary, 1939 sailboat art - smaller

This lovely little sailboat was created by my Great Grandma Mary Brown Young Costello in 1939 using chalk.  It appears to be an oil chalk.  My great aunt recently gave it to my sister who brought it straight to me to scan.

What a little treasure!  Grandma Costello was very talented.  She crocheted, cross-stitched, tatted, arranged flowers at a flower shop, and apparently created beautiful chalk drawings.

Aunt Barbara said that Grandpa Costello didn’t like her to draw.  I’m curious about that.  I wish I had been there to ask a few follow-up questions.  Like, did he dislike her art or the time she spent?  Or did she go somewhere to take a class and maybe that was his issue?  Expense, time, or a handsome art teacher?  😉

I am so happy my sister has a new family treasure to love and that she allowed me to capture a high quality scan so we can all enjoy Grandma Costello’s art.

 

Do you have any artists in your family?  How do you preserve and share their work?

 

ps – This drawing is framed under glass.  I did not remove it from the frame because of it’s age and the fact that it was created with chalk.  I scanned it on a high quality flat-bed scanner at my local family history center.  It turned out great!  I scanned it as a .tiff at about 1200 dpi so that family members could print the image in whatever size they prefer.  I sized it down and saved it as a .jpeg to share here.


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Photograph Showcase: Ferris Whitesides Sketch & The Google PhotoScan App

WHITESIDES, Ferris, sketch

This cool sketch is of my husband’s great grandfather, Ferris Whitesides.  He happens to be my husband’s namesake.  On Sunday we visited his daughter, my husband’s grandmother.

This sketch hangs in her basement.  It is large and framed, with glass.  The sketch has hung in the basement for as long as I’ve known Grandma, more than 20 years.  It’s the kind of item that is difficult to scan and even more difficult to “borrow” to scan.

I decided to try out the new Google PhotoScan app to capture a scan of this precious family treasure.  I was surprised by how easy it was to use and how well it did in poor conditions.  The lighting in the basement is not good and the glare on the glass is very noticeable.  The app took care of most of that.  You can see a lighter spot on the right side of the image.  This is where the majority of the glare was.  But overall, not bad at all.

I think I am going to play with the app some more and see how it compares to a variety of other scanning and photo taking options.  The real test will come with printing the different images.  We’ll see what the quality differences are.

 

Have you tried the new Google PhotoScan app?

 

 

ps – I feel like I have a genealogy sports injury.  I found out I have a cataract in my right eye.  What on earth?!  I’m 40.  Four-oh.  The worst part is when they fix it, I’ll have to sit on the bench for a bit.  Sigh.  But the bright side is when they remove the lens, they will put in one that is my prescription.  I will get to ditch my glasses and contacts.  Hooray!  Now, here’s hoping they get bad enough to fix this year since I’ve met my deductible already…

 


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Photograph Showcase: Grandma and Her Fancy Dress

ELLIS, Mary Margaret, wearing black sequined dress in snow - smaller

This photo of my Grandma, Mary Margaret Ellis, comes from a bundle of negatives found in her collection.   She has an engagement ring on, so I am guessing this was taken sometime while my Grandpa was on his LDS mission in New Zealand.  I need to do a little digging to nail down those dates.

I love the details of her dress.  She made most of her own dresses.  I wonder if she made this one too?  It’s a little bit fancy, I wonder what it was for?  They got married in June so I don’t think it was for any wedding festivities.

 


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Photograph Showcase: Ronald Peterson, age 31

PETERSON, Ronald, 31 years old portrait

This is my Grandpa, Ronald Skeen Peterson, in 1957 at the age of 31.

Two years later he was hired by Utah State University as a counselor.  He would very shortly be made head of the department.  He taught abnormal psychology while running the counseling and testing department for the remainder of his years at USU.

Prior to his hire by USU, he worked as a counselor at the University of Oregon where he completed his PhD work in psychology.

I wonder if this lovely portrait was taken for the University of Oregon or on the occasion of his graduation?  I need to nail down the dates of a few things and I might be able to make a more accurate guess.

Either way – it’s a beautiful photo.  It has a rather large orangish-brown stain across his forehead and off to the side.  It cleaned up nicely in photoshop.  Ahhhhh photoshop, a photo preservers best friend.  😉

 

 


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Photograph Showcase: Finding the Original of a Favorite Photo

PETERSON, Ronald as young boy in front of house - smaller

I LOVE this darling little photo of my Grandpa from 1931.  I love his happy smile, that jaunty tie, and the cute little tip of his ankle.  I’ve seen this photo in several places – my dad’s Book of Remembrance created by his mother, my Grandma’s Book of Remembrance, and in bundles of favorite photos that my Grandma made copies of for loved ones.  This is a well known photo for me.

I was sooooo delighted to find the original of this precious photo.  The color difference was a bit hard for me to adjust to.  So I played with a few filters in Photoshop.  Which do you like best?

PETERSON, Ronald 1931

The original – there is some discoloration seen throughout the photo.

PETERSON, Ronald 1931 - b&w

This filter is called “Black and White Beauty”.

PETERSON, Ronald 1931, pw b&w

This filter is called “Pioneer Woman Black & White”.

PETERSON, Ronald 1931 - l&e

This filter is called “Lovely and Ethereal”.

I don’t normally use photo filters on old family photos.  But something about the state of this photo seemed to call for a little editing.  Which do you like best?  How do you feel about filters and old family photos?  Are you a photo purist?  I like to edit out scratches, tears, dust, and other damage, but I usually leave the color alone, unless it is orange from an old magnetic album.  The orange is too much for me to leave alone.

 

Happy Thursday, I hope you make a delightful photo discovery today!

 

All filters are courtesy of the Pioneer Woman and can be found here.

 

 

ps – You may have noticed my absence in reading, commenting, and responding these last few weeks.  I have been on a WILD and rewarding DNA ride that I hope to be able to tell you all about one day.  Let’s just say, when they warn you that when you DNA test you might find a family secret – well, I can now attest to that being completely true.

 


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Major Milestone Right Here!

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Last week I filed and filed and filed letters.  Do you know what a treat it is to open letter after letter and see your grandparents handwriting?  To touch the pages they touched?  To hear their sweet and enduring love for each other?  It was completely joyful for me.

I am soooooo happy to say that I filed every single letter for the 5 1/2 years they wrote to each other!  Ten Hollinger boxes filled with letters.

(Of course, I still have the letters from the 1960s when my Grandpa was in graduate school.  But we won’t even think about those yet.)

As soon as I finish scanning Aunt Vera’s scrapbook – these letters are next on deck for scanning.  I think they deserve their own blog.  Maybe this fall.  😉

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These four boxes were mostly full on Wednesday when I started.  They look so beautiful empty, I might just leave them on my table for a day to enjoy their tender place in my heart.

 

Happy Monday, I hope you conquer a special genealogy project sometime this year – it is an incredible feeling!