thegenealogygirl


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Photograph Showcase: The First Image From A Precious Collection

costello08 - cropped, lightened - 2x, and sharpened - smaller 6000

This beautiful family portrait was given to me by my Grandma several years ago.  It is an 11×17″ photo of my Grandma, my mother, and my mother’s siblings.  My darling Mom is wearing the blue striped dress.

This portrait was one of many in a large Kodak envelope.  All of the photos were taken by my Great-Grandmother Estelle Duval at her studio – Duval Portraits in Spokane, Washington.  Most of the photos in this envelope were hand colored with oil paints by Grandma Duval.  She was remarkably talented.

For the past several years – maybe 7 or so – these photos have been patiently waiting for some attention.  Well, two weeks ago when I scanned the Telesphore Brouillette book, I also scanned all 28 of the 11×17″ portraits.

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It felt pretty fantastic to finally get these treasures scanned.  I just needed some time and access to a large, high-quality flat-bed scanner.  Thank you, BYU for helping me out!

The only bummer, and it is a very slight bummer, is that many of these precious photos were printed on textured paper.  The scans exaggerate the texture and the photos come out much darker than they really are.  Here is the original scan:

costello08 - cropped - smaller

And here it is lightened up a bit:

costello08 - cropped, lightened - smaller

And here it is with a little bit of sharpening:

costello08 - cropped, lightened, and sharpened - smaller

And then finally, with some more sharpening and another layer of lightening:

costello08 - cropped, lightened - 2x, and sharpened - smaller 6000

Which version appeals most to you?

 

I am sooooo happy to have finally scanned these treasures!

 

 

Happy Thursday, I will be enjoying lots of family time next week for Thanksgiving.  I’ll be taking the week off.  If you are also celebrating Thanksgiving, may I suggest that you spend some time preserving memories?  The FamilySearch Memories app is free and a fantastic way to record audio.  It can record segments up to 15-minutes in length.  Get your family talking about their favorite memories of loved ones now gone and record those gems.  Have the Google PhotoScan app ready to go so you can scan any photos that catch your eye.  Remember, the app isn’t nearly as good as a scanner, but sometimes, it’s the only thing you’ve got.  I hope you have a blessed and thankful week!  I am thankful for each of you who make my genealogy experience so much richer.  xoxo

 

 


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A New Toy at the Library

 

tb book 0011

The first page of text from the Telesphore Brouillette book, exactly as it scanned, saved as a jpeg.  Looks pretty good!

 

On Friday I went on a little adventure with my favorite 5-year-old pal.  I picked him up from Kindergarten, had a quick lunch, and then we were off to BYU for some important work.  I had reserved an overhead scanner so that I could scan the Telesphore Brouillette book my cousin Margaret mailed to me.

Now you might be wondering about my taking a 5-year-old to a Family History Library.  (You aren’t the only one.  A certain well-known genealogist who has strong opinions about who should and should not work on genealogy doesn’t think he belongs there either.  And yet, he is always there when I show up with my kiddo.  Haha!)  I swear, my kid is the best 5-year-old ever.  A few new Kindergarten apps on my phone, and the promise of a “pink cookie” after we are done and that kid is an angel.  Well.  He is always an angel.

We arrived and I went to the desk because I wasn’t sure which scanner was the one I had reserved, when low and behold I spotted this brand new beauty.

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It was love at first sight.  I bailed on my scheduled scanner and used this brand-spankin’ new toy.  Okay.  I don’t actually know how new it really is.  It’s new since the last time I went to BYU.

It can’t be reserved, but I lucked out and it was free.  I scanned the Telesphore Brouillette book – all 185ish pages – in 45 minutes.

FORTY-FIVE MINUTES!

 

Do you know how long it would have taken me on a flat-bed scanner?!

Me neither.  But a reeeeeeally long time.  Like a few weeks.  Maybe even two months.

(Insert an explanation here about patrons at the center and not having lots of time and getting bored if I scan for too long.  etc.  etc.)

The best part was that I was way less worried about damaging the book.  It is so simple to just turn the page and hit scan.  Way less wear and tear on the spine and binding.

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You can see a bit of the fancy scanning tech in this photo.  Also the books on Japanese something or other that were the perfect plain black to use as my “weights” to hold the pages open.

I will definitely be using this scanner again.  In fact, I did a few test pages of a different item I have been scanning, the painfully slow way, that I am going to compare and see if I like the quality well enough to switch to this scanner.

So for those who may wonder… this scanner can scan at 600 dpi, save to a thumb-drive or upload to the cloud (and maybe email…?  I think there were four save options).  The available formats include jpeg, pdf, searchable pdf – which is FABULOUSLY accurate by the way, and a few others I ignored.  There is no tiff setting.  You can save as one set of images or as individual images.  You can save in one format and then save again in another format, over and over until you have everything you want.  As you are scanning, if you notice a scan isn’t what you want – not straight enough or something – you can select those images and delete them, rescan those pages, and then keep scanning.

I am in love!

My cute little pumpkin was an angel as always.  He definitely earned his “pink cookie” after a nice leisurely stroll across campus.  He insisted on stomping on crunchy leaves and then throwing them up in the air by the handsful while I took some pictures.

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Isn’t he adorable?  ❤️❤️❤️

 

Happy Monday, I hope you make a fantastic genealogy discovery this week!

 

 

ps – I have been very absent the last two months.  I have some serious catching up to do.  Thank you for hanging with me.  xoxo

 

 


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Photograph Showcase: Who on Earth is Albert?

We humans are, well, human.

Recently, my human-ness reared its head.

See that photo up there?  The one labeled Albert?  I actually have a few more photos from a similar time period labeled Albert that are clearly photos of this same person.  But guess what my mind saw?

Arthur.

Hmmmmm…

The Hyde family has several brothers.  Not a one of them is named Albert, at least, not that I know of.  There is an Arthur.  But each of the photos in question is clearly labeled “Albert”.

The “Albert” appears to be consistent with having been written at or near the taking of the photograph while the notes on the back were clearly written later by my own Grandma who never met Arthur or the Mystery “Albert”.

Who on earth is Albert?!

I guess I better try to figure it out.

 

 


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Photograph Showcase: A Sneaky Photo for a son in the Army

 

COTELLO, John, 1940s, sent to Dan in the Army

John Costello, 1940s, photo sent to son Dan who was serving in the Army.

 

This photo of my great grandfather, John Costello, was sent to his son Dan while Dan was serving in the Army during WWII.  John didn’t like to have his photo taken.  Apparently, he also didn’t like his photo shared.

There are two notes on the back of this photo written by two different women at two different times.

COTELLO, John, 1940s, sent to Dan in the Army - photo back

The first note was written by John’s wife, Mary Brown Young, and reads:

“Dad would Have a fit if he knew I was sending you this picture.  But it was the best of Him.  see your Garage?”

The second note was written later by Dan’s wife, my Grand Aunt Barbara, and reads:

“194+

Dan asked for pictures of his Mom & Dad, when he was in the army”

 

I so am glad that Uncle Dan asked for photos!  That request meant that this photo stayed with Dan & Barbara and made its way to me.  It is one of so very few photos of John Costello.  I treasure each one.

 

ps – I love the hat!  How about you?

 

 


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Photograph Showcase: The Marriage That Stuck

wedding

I was 8 1/2 years old when my Grandma married my Grandpa.

The funny thing about that is until just now, I thought I was 10 when they were married.  In fact, I have said that very phrase, “I was 10 when my Grandma married my Grandpa”, over and over again.  Except that I wasn’t 10.  I was 8 1/2.

I was there when they got married on the reservation in Wellpinit, Washington.  I have a few memories of that day.  But now, I wonder how accurate those memories are.

I remember something about my Grandma needing to be adopted by a bird-clan mother so she could marry Grandpa on the res.  But is that even a thing?  A bird-clan mother?  I don’t know.

I remember my Mom making a joke that Grandma had just married her brother since they had the same bird-clan mother.  Grandma didn’t find that joke particularly amusing.  But did my Mom really make that joke to her own mother?

I remember the drums, and the jingling of bells on my Grandma’s clothing.  But as I look at the photo I don’t see any of the small metal bells I am picturing when I hear the sound in my memory.  Bells that aren’t shiny at all.  Small, handmade bells that dangle at the end of a strand of beads.  But were there really bells?

I remember playing outside under some very large pine trees.  There were pine needles and cones everywhere.  But there are pine trees everywhere in Spokane.  Did I really play under them on that day on the res?

I remember my Mom making some comment that this marriage might be the one that finally sticks.  I remember my Grandma saying something about how if you get married on the res you can’t ever divorce.  I didn’t understand why that mattered so much to my Mom that day.  I do now.

This wasn’t Grandma’s first or second marriage.  The number was higher.  But it was the first marriage during my lifetime.  It was the first time I had a Grandpa on my Mom’s side of the family.

Of course, my Mom has a father.  A father she shares with all three of her siblings.  A father who is still alive.  A father I met once when I was 16.  A father I have spoken with twice on the phone.  And while you would be accurate if you called him my grandfather, he was never my Grandpa.

But this man, the man my Grandma married on the Reservation when I was 8 1/2, he became my Grandpa.  And that, in the end, is the only memory from that day that really matters.

This was the marriage that stuck.

And I am so very glad.

 

 

ps – This photo is not the one I remember seeing of this day.  The photo my Mom has of this day is not as happy.  It’s more formal and posed.  This photo only exists on the wall of Grandma & Grandpa’s home.  During my final visit to my Grandma in the days before her death, I used the Google photoscan app to preserve a copy of this happy photo for myself.  And once again, I am so very glad.

 

 


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Photograph Showcase: Adorable in his Knickers

 

PETERSON, Ronald as young boy in knickers

Ronald Skeen Peterson

 

This adorable boy is my Grandpa, Ronald Skeen Peterson.  There are so many things about this photo to love – his suit, especially the knickers, his socks, the big smile, the tip of his head, the details of the curtains in the background.  It’s just a great picture that puts a smile on my face.

 

 

Happy Thursday, the FamilySearch Worldwide Indexing Event starts tomorrow!  Will you index just one batch?  Click on over and give it a try.

 


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Photograph Showcase: In Uniform

 

DUVAL, Francis Cyprien on boat

Francis Cyprien Duval, on far right

Francis Cyprien Duval is my 2nd great grandfather.  He was born 3 October 1863 in Rimouski, Québec, Canada.  He was the first in our direct line to leave Québec after settlement from France.

Francis was an adventurer.  He was in Dawson, Alaska before the Gold Rush began.  He stayed throughout and did well.  He tried his hand at homesteading in Fairbanks.  He moved his wife and children back and forth between Alaska and California for many years.

Sometime after the death of his father-in-law, Henry Hyde, in Fairbanks in 1907, Francis and his family moved to Vancouver, BC and then finally settled in Lynn Valley, BC.

He lied about his age and joined the Canadian Expeditionary Forces during WWI.  That didn’t last long before he was sent back home.

He went on to work as a Forest Ranger.  He continued in that work until the time of his death at age 55 on 31 May 1919 in Vancouver, BC.

This photo is one of very few photos of Francis.  There are no notations on the back.  Based on what I know of Francis’ life, I would guess that this was taken during his service in WWI.  I did some google searching and his hat and collar seem to match the images of the uniforms during this time.

Francis died before he was a grandfather.  I descend from his son Francis Henry Duval.  Francis Henry was the father of two children – my Grandma Deane, who recently died, and my Grand Uncle Frank.

During the last two days of my Grandma’s life, the family gathered at her side.  In my conversations with Uncle Frank, he expressed disappointment that he hadn’t thought to ask his Dad about his Grandpa.

So, Uncle Frank, this one’s for you.