thegenealogygirl


2 Comments

Rosey’s Girls – A Crazy Trip Down the Rabbit Hole

marrying mess

There’s that chart again – edited to include Rosey’s marriages and children.

There are some family puzzles that take years to solve.  You gather bits here and there that don’t always make sense.  Slowly, you learn more, but the core questions remain.  Then more records become available and you add those to the bits you already have and suddenly you are able to tie things together in a way you couldn’t before.  That is exactly the meandering path that Aunt Rosey has sent me on.  And what a journey it has been!

Almost two years ago I wrote about all of the matrimonial connections in this part of my tree.  Then, nearly a month ago now, I wrote about the Robert Hyde – Rosey Hyde marriage and child.  The questions that post brought up led me to spend time on a serious review of my sources and follow up on every single lead I had.  That process led me to find a tiny little hint of Norma.

 

Finding Norma meant that I discovered Rose Elvera Hyde wasn’t new to me.  I had just forgotten about her.

In fairness though, I had first known her as Elvira Kingham.

Let’s take a little journey down the rabbit hole together, shall we?

 

Many moons ago, the first record I found about Rosey Hyde – that I knew FOR SURE was about Rosey – was this marriage record to Harry Grant Kingham in 1914.

 

Rose Hyde & Harry Kingham, 1914 marriage record

“British Columbia Marriage Registrations, 1859-1932; 1937-1938,” database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:JDZN-H68 : 21 January 2016), Harry Kingham and Rosey Hyde, 19 Apr 1914; citing Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada, British Columbia Archives film number B11378, Vital Statistics Agency, Victoria; FHL microfilm 1,983,706.

 

Rosey is listed as a spinster, which I had no reason to question.  I figured the record was accurate and thought I had found her first marriage.  The natural next step was to try to learn everything I could about Harry Grant Kingham.  I didn’t find much.  But I did find this US Consular Record.

 

KINGHAM, Harry Grant, 1915 US Consular Record

Ancestry.com. U.S., Consular Registration Certificates, 1907-1918 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2013. http://ancstry.me/2oJg9ew

I hadn’t yet become savvy about how complicated this family was when I first found this document.  It lists two daughters for Harry that were born prior to his marriage to Rosey.  I tried to research them and just couldn’t find anything about a Grace Kingham or an Elvira Kingham.  I made the natural assumption that they were his daughters prior to his marriage to Rosey.  I tried to find a first wife for him – even though he was listed as a bachelor on his marriage record to Rosey – no luck.

So what did I do?

I added two daughters to Harry Grant Kingham with an unknown mother.  The girls were not attached to Rosey in my tree.

Now, fast forward to a few weeks ago…

When I found Rosey’s death record and discovered she had a daughter named Rose Elvera Hyde Williamson, I had forgotten all about Elvira Kingham.

Thank goodness for that pesky little travel record that was generated when Rose Elvera Hyde Williamson went to visit her sister Mrs. Norma ?rance in 1945.  That record led me to revisit every source attached to every person connected to Rosey Hyde.

So there I was, suddenly staring at two different Elveras in my tree – Elvira Kingham and Rose Elvera Hyde Williamson.  But they were really the same person.  So I merged them.

I quit taking any parent child relationships for granted at this point and used every combo of names for each girl.  I also quit considering Rosey’s husbands as minor character actors in her life.  The girls used Harry’s last name so I needed to know everything about Harry that I could find.

The next notable stop down the rabbit hole was Harry’s WWI Canadian Expeditionary Forces Personnel File.  There were plenty of facts about Harry but there were two pages that were especially enlightening about Rosey’s girls.

 

HYDE, Muriel Grace, record

Library and Archives Canada; Ottawa, Ontario, Canada; CEF Personnel Files; Reference: RG 150; Volume: Box 5181 – 42; http://ancstry.me/2qc1mci

 

This particular image was page 38 of Harry’s file and it told me that Grace was actually named Muriel Grace.

 

KINGHAM, Norma Robertine, record

Library and Archives Canada; Ottawa, Ontario, Canada; CEF Personnel Files; Reference: RG 150; Volume: Box 5181 – 42; http://ancstry.me/2qc1mci

 

This image was page 50 of Harry’s file and is the second mention of Norma – Norma Robertine Kingham – to be exact.

Suddenly, Rosey’s three girls began to make more sense to me.  I updated Grace in my tree with the name Muriel Grace Hyde, added Norma, and away I went.

Ancestry.com very quickly added a few hints to Muriel, including this Washington State Application for License to Wed.

 

HYDE, Muriel Grace and Walter E Groome, 1924 application for license to wed

Washington State Archives; Olympia, Washington; Marriage Affidavits; http://ancstry.me/2q2GMMs

 

It certainly matched the few details I had about Muriel Grace.  The fact that the witness was a Robert Hyde was intriguing, but even more interesting to me was this line in the application: “…I further swear that there is no legal impediment to their marriage…and [they] are not nearer of kin to each other than second cousins.”

Hmmmmm… if that Muriel Grace was my Muriel Grace, and if that Robert Hyde was my Robert Hyde, did he feel sheepish signing that form and remembering that Muriel’s parentage was himself and his niece Rosey?

That is some genealogical irony right there.

Next, I pulled up the actual marriage certificate.

 

HYDE, Muriel G and Walter E Groome, 1924 Marriage Record

Washington State Archives; Olympia, Washington; Marriage Certificates; http://ancstry.me/2otrp2x

 

Muriel listed her parents as Robert Hyde, born in Sheffield, Eng and Alice Whiteley, born in Sheffield, Eng.  Robert and Alice are the two witnesses to this union.

What?!

 

Quick recap – Alice Whiteley Hyde is the aunt turned step-mom of Rosey Hyde.  At the time of Muriel Grace Hyde’s birth, Alice Whiteley Hyde was married to Henry Hyde – her first marriage and his second.  If she was ever married to Robert Hyde is was after she was widowed first by Henry, then by his brother Arthur.  She was the informant on Robert’s death record and listed him as the divorced spouse of Rosey, not as her husband.

So, was Muriel the daughter of Alice or Rosey?

If it was Alice, then Alice had a child with her husband Henry’s brother while she was still married to Henry, then after Henry’s death proceeded to marry a different brother – Arthur, before finally settling down to live with the third brother Robert when she was once again widowed.

That seems too crazy, even for this family.

Did Muriel list Alice as her mother – because Alice was there, conveniently had the last name of Hyde as if she was married to Robert, and had a different maiden name – in an effort to avoid an uncomfortable conversation about why her mother’s maiden name matched her father’s name?  Especially when the license required that bride and groom not be more closely related than second cousins?  Was that little question putting Muriel on the spot mentally?  Was it highlighting her uncomfortable past?  Was Muriel lying to save face?  Was she lying because she was embarrassed?

And, why was Robert at the wedding but not Rosey?  In 1924 Rosey was a widowed single mom with two girls at home.  Maybe she couldn’t afford to travel from Vancouver, BC to Vancouver, Washington?

I hoped that Muriel’s death record might reveal something, anything, but unfortunately it is an index only record on both the BC Archives and FamilySearch.  FamilySearch does hold the microfilm on which the record exists, but it is stored in the Granite Mountain Vault.  {I will probably take a little trip up to Salt Lake to view the film, I just have to remember how to request a film from the vault… That is, if that film is allowed to be viewed…}

But I digress, the index to Muriel’s death lists this:

 

Screen Shot 2017-04-25 at 3.55.32 PM

“British Columbia Death Registrations, 1872-1986; 1992-1993”, database, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:FLLT-LM9 : 13 April 2017), Muriel Grace Groome, 1936.

 

Muriel is listed as having a father named Robert Hyde.  I find no record of any children born to Muriel and Walter during their 12 years of marriage.

At this point I reviewed a few old family notes and letters.  Now be careful not to get lost here.  I found a letter written by Vera, daughter of Alice Hyde Duval who is the sister of Rosey Hyde.  Yes that’s right, both sisters named a daughter Elvera.  This letter written by Vera to my Grandma, mentions an old scrapbook that Vera kept.  She asked my Grandma if she wanted to have it.

I had a lightbulb moment and remembered that my mom’s cousin Heather had emailed me a few scans of an old scrapbook she had.  I dug through my emails and found those scans.  Among them was this page.

 

valmore 4

 

When Heather sent this to me all those years ago, I had NO EARTHLY IDEA who Mr. and Mrs. Peter Williamson were.  I did some basic searching but came up empty.  I figured they were important to someone in my family so I went ahead and added them to FamilySearch and uploaded the announcement.  But now?  The minute that image opened, I knew exactly who they were – this was a marriage invitation for the daughter of Rose Elvera Hyde and Peter Williamson.

Rosey was a Grandma!

This union of Carole Rose Williamson and Gordon David Zilke produced at least four children.  Of those four children, at least one has died.  But the other three may be living.  I did a little Facebook digging and found a small cluster of living descendants.  Because this whole thing started from the position of thinking that Rosey was a gay barber who had no children, I was completely shocked to discover that Rosey has living descendants.  I was not expecting that at all.  I wonder if any of them know anything about Rosey?  I wonder if any of them have pictures of Rosey?

Because I think I do.

Duval - mystery marriage

I think this photo is of Rosey Hyde & Harry Grant Kingham at the time of their marriage in 1914.

I’m getting sidetracked again…

At the time of Rose Elvera Hyde’s Marriage to Peter Williamson, she listed her parents as Robert Hyde, born in England, and Rose Hyde, born in Golden, BC.

 

HYDE, Rose Elvera and Peter Williamson, 1927 Marriage Record

“British Columbia Marriage Registrations, 1859-1932; 1937-1938,” database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:JD8Y-NXZ : 21 January 2016), Peter Williamson and Rose Elvera Hyde, 04 Jul 1927; citing Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada, British Columbia Archives film number B13753, Vital Statistics Agency, Victoria; FHL microfilm 2,074,506.

 

At the time of Rose Elvera Hyde’s death, her parents are listed as Robert Hyde, born in Sheffield, England, and Rose Whitely, born in Golden, BC.

 

 

The records for both Muriel Grace and Rose Elvera Hyde are inconsistent in identifying their parentage.  But they are clearly describing the same grouping of people.  Were these inaccuracies intentional or accidental?  Were they hiding something?  It seems like it.

This leaves one more daughter – Norma.  The daughter that is definitely not a child of Robert Hyde.  Norma, the daughter of Rosey Hyde, and Harry Grant Kingham.  Norma, who led me deep into the rabbit hole.  Norma, who changed her name to Barbara.  Norma, who deserves her own post.

So here I am stuck in this mental loop where I just can’t seem to reconcile everything.  Part of me wants to believe that Rosey’s birth is the key.  That Rosey isn’t really the daughter of Henry Hyde and Ann Whiteley.  That maybe, just maybe, Rosey is the child of another couple, but that Ann and Henry took her in for some reason.  That reason wouldn’t be hard to come up with.  They were living in the extreme west in a very tiny little speck of a town.  So maybe Rosey is my adopted 2nd great grand aunt.  And just when I think I have myself good and convinced that this might be the case, I talk myself back out of it because there is no baby girl born in Golden, BC on the date that Rosey claims as her birthdate.  No baby girl of ANY name born in the entire year of 1883 in Golden, BC.

Where does this all leave me?

I’m not sure.

There is a story here – that is for certain.  It’s not a traditional story.  But man is it intriguing.  I have a few more records I am trying to scrounge up that I hope will shed some light on the core question – were Rosey Hyde and Robert Hyde both husband and wife AND uncle and niece?

  • I have reached out to the appropriate agency to try to get a copy of Robert and Rosey’s divorce decree – if it exists.
  • I have requested a copy of Alice Whiteley Hyde’s probate record.
  • I have ordered the Homestead File for Alice Whiteley Hyde and Henry Hyde’s homestead in Alaska.
  • I have requested any records about this whole lot from the church in Alaska that Alice Hyde Duval’s oldest son was baptized in – maybe there will be another event for that family in that church.
  • I need to get my hands on the image of Muriel Grace Hyde Groome’s death record if I can.
  • And lastly, I am currently building a spreadsheet with everyone’s entries in the City Directories to help me understand the timeline even better.  It is very enlightening.

 

And that, my friends, is where I am at.  Still undecided.  Still searching.  My core question is most likely unanswerable.  But I am so glad that I asked the question because I have learned so much more about this part of my family.  I have learned so much more about Rosey.

Rosey has become a very different person to me.  The picture of her life in my heart is very delicate and intricate.  There are details that come from the nuances of the records that lead me to believe that Harry was the great love of her life, that Neil was a loving old age companion, and that Robert, well, Robert seems to be the villain.  I don’t know if that’s fair, but that is who he is becoming in my mind.

Thank you for journeying down the rabbit hole with me.  Don’t get lost, it can be scary down here.  Head back up to light if you can.  😉

 

Happy Wednesday, I hope you make a fascinating genealogy discovery today!

 

 

ps – Despite all of the records that I included, there are so many that I did not include.  Among those are a few international travel records for Robert, Rosey, and the two older girls.  Hmmmm…  

 

pps – If you happen to be one of Rosey’s living descendants, email me – amberlysfamilyhistory {at} yahoo {dot} com.  Let’s put our tid-bits together and make this picture as clear as we can.  That is, if you can forgive me.

 

 


12 Comments

Incest?! – An Update: ALWAYS Go To The Next Image!

Whiteley - Hyde

Yep, it’s that image again.

Last week I begged for your help to disprove my theory of incest.  My friend Cathy commented, “The biggest sore thumb I noticed was – who is Norma?”

Exactly?!  Who is Norma.  I had already tried a bunch of things and just couldn’t find her.  But after Cathy asked the same question I was asking, I decided I really needed to find her.  I rededicated myself and used all of my fancy, sneaky, super-smart search strategies and I got a whole lotta nothin’.

But give me a puzzle and I just can’t stop.  So I revisited everyone in that matrimonial mess.  I found a lot more info – but nothing that answered my core question: Were Robert & Rosey Hyde husband and wife, AND uncle and niece?

The one thing I did find was a hint of Norma.  And I found it in an unlikely place.  A WWI Canadian Expeditionary Forces Personnel File.

But the really important part…

The absolutely CRITICAL part…

The it-would-have-been-super-easy-to-miss-Norma-completely part…

Norma showed up on page 50 of the file.

That’s right – page number FIVE-OH.

After a whole lotta nothin’, suddenly, there was Norma.

Thankfully I learned the lesson many years ago that many records have more than one page.  Some records have more than two pages.  And occasionally you will find a record that is a whopping 67 pages long – like the one that gave me a hint of Norma.

Now you probably want to know what exactly I learned about Norma.

And you probably want to know what else I learned about that mess up there.

Here’s the thing – it’s so complicated that my poor brain is still trying to sort it all out.  My poor brain is trying to figure out how to even begin to explain what I have learned.

So for now, let me just say that Norma exists.  She appears to be a sister of Rose Elvera Hyde Williamson.  I know her approximate birthdate.  And I know who two of her possible parents are.

The rest is going to have to wait until I can find the words.  And it’s going to take more than one post.  Because that family up there is a whole mess of crazy.

But my dear friends, this is what I want to leave you with today:

When you are looking at an image on any website – always click to the next image.  And then keep right on clicking until you come to an image that is about someone else.  The longest record I have ever found was 137 pages.  It was also a WWI record.

This WWI Canadian Expeditionary Forces Personnel File was BORRRRRRING!  And I like LOVE old records.  But it just kept saying the same things over and over and over.

Until it didn’t.

Until it told me that Norma exists.  That she is part of my family.

So whatever you do today in your genealogical endeavors, PLEASE, for the love of Norma, CLICK TO THE NEXT PAGE!

More updates on Incest?! coming next week.


19 Comments

Incest?

Whiteley - Hyde

That’s a terrible title isn’t it?  But man, I don’t know what else to call it.  I’m really hoping that the records aren’t telling me what I think they are telling me.  Please, be the judge.  Find my mistakes, point them out.  Help me disprove my own position.

So here goes.

In May of 2015 I shared that diagram up there and wrote, among other things, “Sometime between the 1920 census and Robert’s death in 1928, it appears he may have married his niece Rosey Hyde – his first known marriage and her second of three.  Hmmmmm.  That is a story worthy of its own post.”

At the time that I wrote that, I was operating under one rather large assumption – that Rosey was gay.  Why did I think that?  Well, my Grandma knew Rosey.  She describes her as a gay barber.  I know that isn’t definitive, but relying on that piece of information allowed me to consider a better conclusion than incest.

So what was the conclusion I was considering when I wrote the post mentioning their possible marriage?  Because he had never married previously and she was, in my Grandma’s estimation, gay, I wondered if they legally married so that he could more easily leave his property to her.  They were both living in a country other than the ones in which they were born.  No one knew their family.  Could Uncle have married Niece for the simple purpose of keeping property in the family?

In the intervening months I have learned more about each of them.  But let’s start at the beginning.  This handwritten note is just one section of an outline created by Vera Duval in the 1960s.  Vera is my great grandaunt.  She is the daughter of Alice Hyde Duval.  She personally knew all of the people at the center of this post.  In the first section she names her aunt, Rosey as having 3 last names – Hyde, Kingham, Carlson.  In the third section she writes:

“Robert Hyde the II [Vera is only indicating that he is the second known Robert Hyde in the family, she does this often.  Robert’s parents are Henry and Sarah] – 1st husband of Rose Hyde – Born – England – Died – Vancouver, Wash. – about yr 1926 – 75 years of age – old age.  Henry – Arthur – Robert – Brothers – orig – 5 bros – Eng – Louie & John – 1 sister Letitia died at 16 – Eng…”

HYDE outline

In the entirety of this document I have so far only proven things to be correct, or very nearly correct, as I have looked for sources.  There are plenty of things that seem suspect, like the millionaire bachelor that owned diamond mines, but the things I have researched from this document have been mostly accurate with just slight variations from what Vera wrote.  When I first read the section about Robert Hyde being married to his niece Rosey I thought that I was definitely misunderstanding, that couldn’t be what Vera meant.  Here are the records I have found.

Baptism Record for Robert Hide,1862

“England Births and Christenings, 1538-1975,” database, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:NPG6-Y4W : 30 December 2014), Robert Hide, 07 Jan 1862; citing Sheffield, York, England, reference ; FHL microfilm 6,343,876, fiche 2, 1862, page 92.

Robert Hyde was born 18 July 1861 in Sheffield, Yorkshire, England to Henry Hyde and Sarah Marsden.

1871 census

1871 England Census for Household of Henry Hyde, Class: RG10; Piece: 4676; Folio: 166; Page: 32; GSU roll: 847228, http://search.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/sse.dll?indiv=1&dbid=7619&h=28376327&ssrc=pt&tid=11998768&pid=13128573021&usePUB=true

 

In 1871 Robert is found living with his parents Henry & Sarah and his siblings Ann, John, and Arthur.  His oldest brother Henry, the father of Rosey, is already out of the home.

HYDE, Rosey, 1884 Birth Record

“British Columbia Birth Registrations, 1854-1903,” database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:JDZJ-1B6 : 12 December 2014), Hyde in entry for MM9.1.1/JDZJ-1BD:, 07 Nov 1884; citing British Columbia Archives film number B13808, Vital Statistics Agency, Victoria; FHL microfilm 2,114,957.

 

This birth record is for a daughter born to Henry Hyde and Ann Whiteley on 7 November 1884 in Golden, BC.  Vera listed Rosey’s birthdate as 14 October 1883 in Golden, BC.  I can’t find a birth record that matches the date Vera gave.  Ann died 3 days after this child was born.  Henry was gone for work and came home to find his wife had given birth to a daughter and then died.  He packed up his two (possibly three) girls and went back to England.  He married his deceased wife Ann’s younger sister Alice in January of 1885.  [This union makes everything more confusing because his older daughter is also named Alice.]  He leaves Rosey with his parents in England and then Henry, Alice, and Alice head back to Canada and eventually settle in Alaska.

1891 census

1891 England Census for household of Henry Hyde, Class: RG12; Piece: 3799; Folio: 18; Page: 30; GSU roll: 6098909, http://search.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/sse.dll?indiv=1&dbid=6598&h=4645092&ssrc=pt&tid=11998768&pid=-354645760&usePUB=true

 

In 1891 Rosey can be found living with her grandparents, Henry & Sarah, in Sheffield.  Also in the household are Rosey’s Uncle Arthur and his 1st wife Mary with their daughter Ann, and Rosey’s Uncle Louis.

What follows next is a quiet period.  I know that Rosey leaves England, possibly with her Uncle Arthur as they are both found near Henry & Alice in later years.  Robert also heads west but I have not yet found any travel or immigration records for Robert, Rosey, or Arthur.  There is a 1900 Census record in Nome, Alaska for a ‘Miss Hyde’ that could be Rosey.  Unfortunately, the record only lists her name, no age or birthplace.

Rose Elvera birth

Washington State Archives; Olympia, Washington; Washington Births, 1891-1919; Film Info: Various county birth registers. Microfilm, http://search.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/sse.dll?indiv=1&dbid=1209&h=284297&ssrc=pt&tid=11998768&pid=420077563553&usePUB=true

Rose Elvera Hyde is born 6 April 1908 to Robert Hyde & Rose Hind in Clark, Washington.  As later records will prove, Rose Hind is Rosey Hyde.  No marriage record for Robert & Rosey has been found.

Rose Hyde & Harry Kingham, 1914 marriage record

“British Columbia Marriage Registrations, 1859-1932; 1937-1938,” database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:JDZN-H68 : 21 January 2016), Harry Kingham and Rosey Hyde, 19 Apr 1914; citing Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada, British Columbia Archives film number B11378, Vital Statistics Agency, Victoria; FHL microfilm 1,983,706.

 

On 19 April 1914, Rosey Hyde married Harry Kingham.  She is listed as a spinster which doesn’t jive with the note written by Vera stating that Robert was Rosey’s 1st husband.

1920 census

Year: 1920; Census Place: Bush Prairie, Clark, Washington; Roll: T625_1921; Page: 13A; Enumeration District: 4; Image: 952, http://search.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/sse.dll?indiv=1&dbid=6061&h=71185051&ssrc=pt&tid=11998768&pid=13128573021&usePUB=true

In 1920, Robert Hyde is found living in Bush Prairie, Clark, Washington with his sister-in-law Alice Whiteley Hyde.  At this point Alice has already been married to Henry & Arthur, Robert’s brothers.  On this census they are both listed as married but she is listed as his sister, not his wife.  Alice was most recently married to Arthur who died in 1919.  No marriage records have been found for Robert.

HYDE, Rose Elvera and Peter Williamson, 1927 Marriage Record

“British Columbia Marriage Registrations, 1859-1932; 1937-1938,” database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:JD8Y-NXZ : 21 January 2016), Peter Williamson and Rose Elvera Hyde, 04 Jul 1927; citing Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada, British Columbia Archives film number B13753, Vital Statistics Agency, Victoria; FHL microfilm 2,074,506.

 

On 4 July 1927, Rose Elvera Hyde married Peter Williamson in Vancouver, BC.  Importantly, she lists her parents as Robert Hyde born in England, and Rose Hyde born in Golden, BC.

HYDE, Robert, 1928 Death Record

Death certificates (Washington (State), 1907-1960 ; Index to death certificates, 1907-1979, FHL microfilm 2022474

 

 

On 8 July 1928, Robert Hyde died in Orchards, Clark, Washington.  His parents are listed as Henry Hyde & Sarah.  His birth date is listed as 7 July 1858 – which does not match our Robert.  He is listed as divorced with his former spouse being Rose (Kingham) Hyde.  The informant on the death record is Robert’s sister-in-law Alice Whiteley Hyde (Rosey’s aunt) who was living in his home in 1920.

The birth date difference gave me a glimmer of hope that maybe the Robert who married Rosey and lived with Alice was not their Uncle and brother-in-law.  I scoured FindMyPast, Ancestry, and FamilySearch looking for a Robert Hyde with the birthdate found on this death record.  But alas, the only Robert Hyde near this birth year who could match the man in this death record is the Robert Hyde born to Henry Hyde & Sarah Marsden.

Kingham, Rose & Neil Carlson, 1937 Marriage Record

Ancestry.com. Washington, Marriage Records, 1854-2013 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2012., http://search.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/sse.dll?indiv=1&dbid=2378&h=4132196&ssrc=pt&tid=11998768&pid=-354645760&usePUB=true

On 27 March 1937, Rose Kingham married Neil Carlson in Whatcom, Washington.

Hyde, Rose, 1945 travel record

The National Archives at Washington, D.C.; Washington, D.C.; Manifests of Alien Arrivals at Blaine, Washington; NAI: 2675039; Record Group Title: Records of the Immigration and Naturalization Service, 1787 – 2004; Record Group Number: 85; Series Number: A3599; Roll Number: 024, http://search.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/sse.dll?indiv=1&dbid=1075&h=19553112&ssrc=pt&tid=11998768&pid=420077563553&usePUB=true

 

On 9 August 1945, Rose Elvera Hyde Williamson entered the US to visit her sister Norma ?rance who was living in Mt. Vernon, Washington.  Rose Elvera lists her birthplace as Washougall, Wash and her birthdate as April ? 1908.  Washougal is in Clark County, and her birthdate is 6 April 1908, so this is a match to her birth record.  But who is Norma?  Are they full sisters or half-sisters?  I haven’t found any other mention of Norma so far.

HYDE, Rosey, 1970 Death Record

“British Columbia Death Registrations, 1872-1986; 1992-1993”, database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:FLYZ-GF4 : 30 September 2015), Rosey Carlson, 1970.

 

On 1 March 1970, Rosey Carlson died in Delta, BC.  The informant is her daughter Elvera Williamson.  Rosey is listed as a widow.  Her parents are listed as Henry Hyde & Ann Whitley, both born in England.  Her birth is listed as 14 October 1883 in Golden, BC.  This birthdate matches the handwritten note by her niece Vera Duval, but not the birth record I found in 1884.  [Does this mean Henry & Ann had 3 girls, not 2?  I’m still not sure.]

So, were the Robert Hyde & Rosey Hyde, who were the parents of Rose Elvera Hyde Williamson, uncle & niece?

 

I keep reviewing the records hoping to see a different explanation.  I can’t find one.

Can you?

 

 

I hope so.

 


16 Comments

A Marrying Mess

Whiteley - Hyde

I’ve been failing at my goal to post each week.  I think it’s been about a month since my last post so I thought I’d try to make up for that with a bit of genealogical entertainment straight from my tree.  Welcome to the Whiteley and Hyde families Marrying Mess, complete with hand drawn flow chart – a good use of coloring time with my 3 year old.

Henry Hyde and Ann Whiteley are my 3rd great grandparents.  They married in Sheffield, Yorkshire, England in 1873 and moved to Canada.  Eleven years later, Ann died leaving Henry with two (possibly three) young girls to care for.  Ann died in November and Henry returned to England and married Ann’s sister Alice Whiteley in January.  He left his infant daughter Rosey with his parents and took his daughter Alice, his new bride Alice, and moved to Alaska.

Henry and Alice spent 22 years together before his death in 1907 in Alaska.  About two years after his demise, Alice married Henry’s brother Arthur.  Alice and Arthur spent about 10 years together before his death in 1919.

All of this I knew.  And I had known it for sometime.  But just last week I made some new discoveries that make this story even more interesting – and matrimonially messy.

After Arthur died, Alice lived with his brother Robert.  I’m not sure how long they lived together or what the nature of their relationship was, but in the 1920 census they are living together in Brush Prarie, Clark, Washington.

Sometime between the 1920 census and Robert’s death in 1928, it appears he may have married his niece Rosey Hyde – his first known marriage and her second of three.  Hmmmmm.  That is a story worthy of its own post.

Meanwhile back in England, Ann and Alice’s mother Eliza died leaving their father George Whiteley a widower.  George married Martha Marsden, his sons-in-law’s mother’s sister – his second marriage, her third.

And for just a dash of extra spice, Arthur was married in England with four children prior to his arrival in Alaska.  I don’t know what happened to his wife, but his children are alive and well and living with neighbors after he leaves England.  I have a theory about this.  But that is also a story for another day.

And there you have it – the Whiteley and Hyde families Marrying Mess – and what a beautiful mess it is!

Do you have any families in your tree that had multiple matrimonial connections?


15 Comments

In Memorium

DUVAL, Francis Cyprien, headstone

Frank Duval is my 2nd great grandfather.

This photo of his headstone is quite old.  I imagine it was taken sometime between 1919 and 1921.

When Frank died, his wife was two months shy of turning 39.  His oldest child was 19 years old and his youngest child was just 2 1/2 – there were five of them in all.

That monument up there looks pretty expensive.  Especially for the widowed mother of five.

As the 2nd great granddaughter of Frank and Alice, I’m especially glad to see that chose to memorialize him as “My Loving Husband”.

I imagine it was hard for her to leave Canada after his death.

I wonder if his monument is still standing?  One day, I’d like to go pay my respects and find out.


15 Comments

Ancestor Story – Ann Whiteley – 52 Ancestors

GoldenPhoto of Golden found here.

Ann Whiteley is my 3rd great grandmother.  Her life was much too short and ended sadly.  I don’t know a lot about Ann and I don’t have a picture of her.  I need to do some more research, but this is what I know right now.

From family records I have a birth date of 30 March 1857 in Sheffield, Yorkshire, England.  There are a few potential matches in the Free BMD.  I need to form an opinion and order the certificate I think is hers.  I also need to look in the parish register for her baptism record.

In 1861 she was living in Sheffield with her parents, George and Eliza, an older sister Martha and a younger brother George.  They lived at 34 Rockingham Street.

In 1871 she was not living with her family.  In fact, I haven’t found her yet.  Her parents lived very near where they lived in the previous census.  Household members included George & Eliza, and their children Martha, George, Samuel, and Alice.

Ann married William Henry Hyde(s) on 17 February 1873 in Pitsmoor, Sheffield, Yorkshire, England.  The marriage record lists her as a spinster with no occupation living in Pye Bank.

Sometime after their marriage, Henry & Ann set off for Canada.  Their daughter Alice was born in Ontario in 1880.  By 1884 they were living in or near Golden, British Columbia, Canada.  My great grandfather claims that Ann was the first woman to cross the Canadian Rockies in a prairie schooner.

Ann died 10 November 1884.  According to her death record, she was just 29 years old.  Assuming her birth date is accurate, she was actually only 27 years old.  Either age is much too young.

Her death record lists her cause of death as childbirth.  My great grandfather mentioned something in passing about her death being caused by having some sort of epileptic fit and falling on the stove.  Either way, she did give birth to a baby girl just three days before her death.  Family stories suggest that her husband Henry was away for work.  This certainly seems likely as the baby’s birth record was registered by the Doctor that attended both the birth of the baby and the death of Ann.  On the birth record, Henry is listed as Hyde with no first name and his occupation is teamster on the C.P.R. or Canadian Pacific Railway.  Ann’s death record was registered by the Sheriff.  I find it odd that the two events were registered by different people on the same day – 31 December 1884.  I can’t tell if they were registered at the same office.  One record is handwritten, the other is not.  They use the same format and the certificate numbers suggest they could have been registered in the same office.  And then about that baby – what happened to her?  I’ve written about her here.  I go back and forth between thinking she is Rosey and thinking she is not Rosey.  Did Ann have two daughters or three?  Family members say she had two, but I have learned time and again that this family discounts children who die young.  If the baby born 3 days before Ann’s death also died, maybe they wouldn’t count her.  Or if she was given away, that might also be a reason they would not count her.

Ann’s exact place of death is unclear.  Family records list her death place as Revelstoke District.  The death record does not list a death place.  The doctor who attended her, Dr. A. Sweat, lists his residence as Golden, British Columbia.  Revelstoke and Golden are 148 kilometers apart.  I can’t imagine Ann would have been attended by a doctor that lived that far away.  But I also can’t imagine there were very many doctors in that part of Canada at that time so maybe the Hydes really did live in Revelstoke and the doctor in Golden.  But then there is the added fact that Ann was buried in Golden.  If she had died in Revelstoke would they have taken her to Golden for burial?

Less than 2 months after Ann’s death, her husband Henry married her younger sister Alice in York, York, England.  As a fun twist, when Henry died in 1908, Alice married Henry’s brother Arthur.  Nice little tangle, eh?

I have more work to do here.  I look forward to further researching Ann and her family.  I find her short life sad and fascinating.

For the curious, here are a few records regarding Ann:

Marriage Record found on microfilm at the BYU Family History Library.

Marriage Record

Birth Record for unnamed daughter

Birth Record for unnamed daughter

Death Record

Death Record


14 Comments

Ancestor Story – Alice Hyde – 52 Ancestors

Francis Cyprien, Francis Henry, Elvera & Alice Hyde Duval, 1903 Oakland California

Duval Family, about 1903 in Oakland, California. Francis Cyprien, Francis Henry, Annie Marie Elvera & Alice Hyde Duval.

On Monday I posted a photo of Grandfather Hyde and asked for opinions on my assessment of which Grandfather Hyde was in the photo.  This spurred a whole lot of conversation between myself and Alex of Root to Tip.  She dug up a few records for me and then my curiosity completely changed my research plans for the week in an exciting way.  Since I have the Hyde family dominating my thoughts I decided to write about my most recent direct-line Hyde ancestor, Alice Hyde, my 2nd great grandmother.

Alice was born 29 July 1880 in Muskoka, Ontario, Canada to William Henry Hyde and Ann Whiteley.  Alice was born 7 years and 5 months after her parents were married but as far as I can tell, she is their first child.

When Alice was just four years old, her mother Ann died as the result of childbirth while the family was living in Golden, British Columbia, Canada.  Henry was away for work at the time of this tragedy.  I imagine it was quite a shock to return home to his small, motherless family.  Just shy of two months later, he marries Ann’s younger sister Alice in York, York, England and leaves his daughter Rosey to live with his parents in Sheffield, York, England.  He kept Alice with him.  Rosey may or may not be the child born just prior to Ann’s death.  I wrote more about that here.

Alice is now the step daughter of her aunt who is also named Alice.  So now there are two Alice Hydes in the family and they are only about 11 years apart in age.  I wonder what that was like for young Alice?

Alice Hyde and her step mother Alice Whiteley Hyde.

Alice Hyde and her step mother Alice Whiteley Hyde.

Alice and her family eventually settled in Fairbanks, Alaska.  Henry was known for having the first successful working farm in Fairbanks.  During the year 1896 Henry became acquainted with a man by the name of Francis Cyprien Duval.  Henry tried to convince Frank to claim a piece of land near his farm and try his hand at homesteading.  Frank wasn’t interested.  He had left Quebec to get away from farming.  He was bound for Dawson.

At the age of 16 Alice left her father’s home with Frank and together they traversed the famous Chilkoot Pass.  They beat the Gold Rush by an entire year.  Frank was able to do well mining in Dawson.  He and Alice were married 12 November 1897 in Dawson, Alaska.

At least seven children were born to this union:

  • Annie Marie Elvera Duval, 2 December 1899, in Oakland, California
  • Francis Henry Duval, 10 May 1901, in Oakland, California
  • Leon Howard Duval, 5 September 1907, in Fairbanks, Alaska
  • Delores Lenore Duval, 27 April 1909, in Fairbanks, Alaska
  • Male Duval, died 15 February 1915, age 0, in Lynn Creek, British Columbia
  • Alexander Valmore Duval, 26 August 1916, in Lynn Valley, British Columbia
  • One additional child was born and died prior to 1910, details currently unknown.

Frank and Alice began their marriage in the wild Gold Rush town of Dawson, Alaska.  After a short time they claimed land near Alice’s father’s farm on the Chena Slough 6 miles outside of Fairbanks.  They spent the summers in Alaska and the winters in California.  Frank built them a cabin in Alaska and they purchased a home in Oakland.  My great grandfather, Francis Henry Duval, shared some lovely memories of the homestead in Alaska during an interview with my mom in the 70s.  I recently re-listened to this recording and was excited to find answers to several of the questions I had.  Among the many details, he talked about their garden.  They kept a greenhouse in Alaska and had stoves in there to keep everything warm.  They planted their vegetables in the greenhouse much earlier than anyone else.  They would begin harvesting their lettuces, tomatoes and the like in the spring.  They loaded their bounty into a canoe and took them into Fairbanks and sold them to restaurants.  He shared many other interesting details that make it pretty clear that Frank and Alice were very industrious.

After the big San Fransisco earthquake in 1906, a real estate man wrote to Frank and Alice to let them know that their house had been completely destroyed.  He offered to sell the land for them.  The Duvals decided to stay in Alaska and sell the land.

Alice’s children were getting older.  In order to attend school they had to walk along the railroad tracks for about 3 miles to arrive at the schoolhouse.  Alice would send Vera and if the weather was good she would also send young Frank.  She wanted her children to be able to attend school more easily and she wanted them to have a better education.  In 1908 her father Henry died in Fairbanks.  I’m sure this strengthened her resolve to leave.  She was eventually able to persuade Frank to leave the homestead in Alaska and settle in Vancouver, British Columbia sometime between 1910 and 1911.  They are in Fairbanks in the 1910 US Census and Vancouver in the 1911 Canadian Census.

They only lived in Vancouver a short time before Frank tired of being in the city.  He found a piece of land in Lynn Valley and built a two story home with a basement.  The school was one block from their new home.  My great grandfather recalls being in class one day when one of his schoolmates pointed out the window and exclaimed, “The Duval house is on fire!”.  Everyone rushed out of class and ran toward the home.  There was quite a gathering of townspeople on the lawn in front of the home.  Young Delores had been left at home alone but was rescued when someone heard her cries from the basement.  Shortly after young Frank arrived, Alice returned from her errand to find her home aflame.  She started yelling for people to help save the furniture and whatever they could.  Only young Frank was brave enough to help his mother and together they pulled as many items from the burning house as they could.

Frank determined he would not rebuild his home himself and he hired someone to build on the same spot.

Duval family home in Lynn Valley, British Columbia.

Duval family home in Lynn Valley, British Columbia.

In the spring of 1919, Frank was in a buggy accident while at work.  He was a Forest Ranger and had rented a horse and buckboard to go out and take care of some of his work.  His horse was spooked and he was thrown off the seat of the buckboard landing on his feet.  His leg broke just above the ankle from the impact and the broken bone tore through the flesh landing in the dirt.  The exposed flesh and bone were filthy.  Frank was away from town, all alone.  He took off his shirt, bound his leg and crawled along until he was able to find two sticks large enough to use as makeshift crutches.  He slowly and painfully made his way toward town.  It was a seven mile journey.  The scared horses returned to their home without Frank and so men went out searching for him.  He was rescued after he had traveled about a mile and a half and was taken to the hospital in Vancouver.  From the time his leg was broken until he made it to the hospital 17 hours had passed.  During that time he developed blood poisoning.  He was in the hospital about 7-12 days.  At first the doctors said he was doing well.  Alice was bringing the children to the hospital to visit their father.  Toward the end of his hospital stay he took a turn for the worse and the family was called back.  The doctors told Alice that the only way to save his life was to amputate the leg at the knee.  Frank refused.  He worsened and lost consciousness, Alice consented to the amputation.  The day after the amputation Frank died leaving Alice widowed with 5 children ranging in ages from 18 to 3 years old.

Shortly after Frank’s death, Alice determined to leave Canada and returned to California.  They went to Oakland to see the site of their former home to find it exactly as they had left it in the early spring of 1906.

The family moved around a lot.  Young Frank had the difficult responsibility of providing for his mother and siblings for many years.  Young Frank married in 1930.  For several months after he married, he continued to send money home to his mother.  Eventually he passed the responsibility of her care to his younger brother.

Her later years included additional struggles.  She suffered from poor health and eventually lost another home.  This time it seems she lost her home to the bank near the end of the depression.

In December of 1940 she was arrested on the charge of Grand Larceny in Whatcom, Washington.  She pled guilty and was imprisoned for a few weeks shy of 1 year.  She died 8 1/2 years after her release, 24 June 1950 in Red Bluff, Tehama, California.  There was not contact between Alice and her son Frank after her release.  The circumstances of the last few years of her life are unknown to me.

My grandmother does not have fond memories of Alice.  She says she was a mean, nasty woman.  I imagine Alice’s many losses were very difficult.  I would like to think that she might have been kinder in her younger years.  Maybe not gentle, I imagine she had to be pretty tough to survive in Alaska during that time period.  But hopefully kind.  She must have been brave and strong to endure all that she did.  I hope her last few years of life brought some peace and stability.  I hope she was able to enjoy her time in California before her death.

Do you have any tough frontierswomen in your tree?  What were they like?