thegenealogygirl


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Ellis Album, Photo 3 – All Four Ellis Children

 

ELLIS, children of Claude & Blanche, WWII

The four children of Claude Albert Ellis & Blanche Octavia Huband.  Back, l-r:  Mary Margaret Ellis, Dale Huband Ellis, Beth Louise Ellis; front: Claudia Ellis.

I have so many questions when I look at this photo.  My Grandma is on the left.  She is wearing a corsage made of gardenias.  It appears to be three gardenias.  For their entire married lives, my Grandpa would buy her a double gardenia corsage for Mother’s Day.  In fact, it was such a habit, that the first Mother’s Day after my Grandpa died, the florist delivered a double gardenia corsage to my Grandma.  She called her boys to thank them who then called the florist to thank him.  They took care of it for the remaining Mother’s Days of her life.  When she passed, the florist made her one last double gardenia corsage.  Was the gardenia corsage in this photo from my Grandpa?  Did the tradition start before their first Mother’s Day as a married couple?

Uncle Dale was in the Navy during WWII.  Was this photo taken when he was on leave?  About to ship out?  There is nothing written on the back.  I know that his ship went down and the family spent some uncertain time – weeks? – hoping to hear from him.  In the end, he made it home safely.  Now that I look at this beautiful photograph, I want to know more!!  Hopefully, I find more details in the letters from this time period.

Isn’t Claudia so adorable?  She was born more than a decade after my Grandma, the next youngest sibling.

I love the way that photos cause me to ask questions I hadn’t thought about before.  Studying old photos can be a great way to prompt new research questions.

 

 

 

ps – I’ve been deep cleaning/organizing my office.  I found three more Ellis photo albums.  I may need to rename this series.  Maybe – Red Ellis Album…?  😯😍

 

 

Here are the first two pages of the album to give context for this photo:

IMG_1649

This post is part of a series sharing this wonderful old family photo album.  You can learn more about the album here.


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Photograph Showcase: In the Army

COSTELLO, Daniel Ramon

Daniel Ramon Costello, photo taken during WWII

This wonderful photo comes from the collection of my GrandAunt Barbara.  Pictured is her husband, Uncle Dan.  What a lovely photo of a wonderful man!  I am very grateful that Aunt Barbara is so willing to share.  If I remember correctly, Uncle Dan served in the medical corps of the US Army during WWII.

I took a photo of this photo using my ShotBox.  Didn’t it turn out great?

 

Happy Thursday, I hope you make a fantastic genealogy photo discovery today!  If not, I hope you will choose to scan and share a photo today.  xoxo

 

 

ps – Are any of my genealogy friends US military uniform buffs?  Does his uniform match up with my memory?  I did a little google searching and couldn’t find what I was looking for in the time that I had.

 


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52 Ancestors – Mary Brown Wood, Part 2 – So Much Death

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A few weeks ago I wrote about my cousin Mary Brown.  She had missing babies.  I can’t ignore missing babies.  I dug and dug and in the end, I found that she had four children who died as infants.  It felt so good to find them and add them to my tree with the details of their short but precious lives.

At one point in my post I wrote:

“Oh, Mary.

How many more babies did you lose?”

That was when I had found three and knew there was still at least one missing.  Four babies lost feels like an overwhelming amount of sorrow for one mother.

I noted that there was more work to do on Mary’s family.  I just didn’t expect that I would write another post about my cousin Mary.  I certainly wasn’t planning on it.

But last week, something kept nagging at me to look at Mary’s family some more.  A few hours in, I was unbelievably heartbroken.  For two days, I dug and scratched, and felt sick to my stomach.  I created a timeline for the entire family and felt even more distressed.

Mary’s story is one of the saddest I have ever uncovered.

 

Her first taste of death.

 

When Mary was just a few months shy of her eleventh birthday, her only older sibling, Andrew Brown, died.  His cause of death was 1 – strumous abscess, 2 – phthisis.  In other words, he died of a cold that originated from tuberculosis, and tuberculosis.1

I am sure that was terribly sad for Mary.  But, she had nine other siblings, both of her parents were alive, and I imagine that life probably moved along okay after some grieving.

 

Mary & William

 

A little more than twelve years later, Mary Brown and William Wood were married.2  Forty-three days later, their first child, Alexander Wood was born, 17 March 1894.3

living child count: 1

Just a few weeks before his first birthday, Alexander died of acute pneumonia.4

living child count: 0

Mary was already expecting her second child when Alexander was buried.  That child, William Wood was born 31 October 1895.5

living child count: 1

A little more than two years later, John Wood was born 20 November 1897.6

living child count: 2

Fifteen months after John’s birth, Mary would say goodbye to her own mother, Janet Lorimer Fulton.  Janet succumbed to uterine cancer after a two year battle on 16 February 1899.7  She was just 48 years old.  Mary was only a few months past her twenty-eighth birthday.

But Mary was about to enter a period of her life that included a presumably welcome respite from loss.  Her next five children would be born without the sorrow of death touching their young family.  First, Hugh Brown Wood in 1900.8  Then Annie Wood in 1902.9  David Wood in 1904.10  Edward Brown Wood in 1907.11  And Alexander Wood in 1910.12

living child count: 7

Alexander only lived for twenty days.  6 May 1910, Alexander Wood died of infantile debility.13  In our day, we call this failure to thrive.  Alexander was not able to absorb nutrition from his food.

living child count: 6

Mary went on to give birth to her second known daughter, Janet Brown Wood, 19 June 1911.14

living child count: 7

At eighteen months of age, Janet died on Christmas Eve 1912 of capillary bronchitis and cardiac failure.15  My marvelous middle boy contracted RSV as an infant.  It was so painful to watch him struggle to breathe.  But I had the wonders of modern medicine to assist me in keeping him breathing.  Mary had to hold her baby, watch her struggle for every breath and see her die in her arms.  At least, that is how I imagine it happening.  Such a heartbreaking picture.

living child count: 6

Eight months later, on 29 August 1913, Mary Wood was born.16

living child count: 7

Mary would only live for seven months.  4 January 1915, Mary died of meningitis.17

living child count: 6

Eight months later another daughter, also named Mary, was born 18 September 1915.18

living child count: 7

Seven short days after Mary’s birth, William Wood, William & Mary’s second born child, perished in the Battle of Loos just before his twentieth birthday on 25 September 1915.19

living child count: 6

Almost two years after William’s death, John Wood, third-born child, was married 8 August 1917.20  I hope the thought of future grandchildren cheered Mary’s heart.

At least for a minute.  Sadly, those grandchildren did not manifest.  John’s wife Ellison went on to marry again on 25 November 1921.21  She was listed as a widow on the marriage record.  Despite extensive efforts to find John’s death record, so far, that record has not been located.  I wonder if he may have decided to join the war efforts after his marriage and perished like his brother.  There are plenty of WWI death records that could be him, but they sadly lack enough detail to be certain.

living child count: 5

A little more than a month after Ellison’s remarriage, Hugh Brown Wood & Martha Blair Dean Boyd were married 31 December 1921.22

Sometime during 1922, Hugh & Martha gave Mary her first grandchild, Agnes Blair Boyd Wood.23

living child count: 5

living grandchild count: 1

 

The beginning of the end

 

The following year, on 22 November 1923,24 Annie Wood lost her life at the age of 21 in the Fever Hospital of Bannockburn.25  Her cause of death?  Phthisis pulmonalis.  Today we would call that pulmonary tuberculosis.  I wonder if Annie’s death reminded Mary of her older brother’s death?  They would have been so similar.

living child count: 4

living grandchild count: 1

Sometime after Annie’s death, Hugh & Martha would have a child named William.  He would later serve as the informant on his own father’s death record,26 but his birth falls in the period where records are not publicly available to view.  I’m hoping his birth brought some joy for Mary.

living child count: 4

living grandchild count: 2

That joy would be interrupted when Edward Brown Wood, just seventeen years old, died in Ochil Hills Sanatorium after a two year battle with pulmonary tuberculosis on 15 February 1925.27

living child count: 3

living grandchild count: 2

For nearly six years, Mary would enjoy another respite from loss.  Until on 14 December 1930, David, at the age of twenty-six, would die of phthisis pulmonalis at home.28  Another death caused by tuberculosis.  If you are counting, this one makes four – three children, one sibling.

living child count: 2

living grandchild count: 2

In early May of 1934, Mary’s youngest daughter would give birth to an illegitimate son named Hugh Brown Wood.

living child count: 2

living grandchild count: 3

Hugh would live for two short weeks before dying of: 1 – prematurity, 2 – congenital debility, and worst of all 3 – pemphigus, on 17 May 1934 at the Royal Infirmary in Stirling.29  Pemphigus is a horrible disease where watery blisters form on the skin.

living child count: 2

living grandchild count: 2

A mere twelve days after the horrors of Hugh’s death, his mother, Mary Wood, youngest child of William & Mary, would also die of phthisis – or tuberculosis – in the home of her parents at the age of 18 on 29 May 1934.30

living child count: 1

living grandchild count: 2

Five deaths to tuberculosis, four of them Mary’s children, one a brother.  Four infant deaths.  One death in battle.  And one unknown cause of death.  At least eleven children were born to Mary Brown & William Wood.  Mary & William would lose ten – TEN! – of those children during their lifetimes.  Only two of their children would marry.  They would have only three known grandchildren.  I feel so numb when I consider the sheer number of deaths Mary experienced.  Horrible, painful deaths.

There would again be a rest from death for a time.  There would even be a few bright spots in Mary’s family despite the fact that WWII was raging.  24 April 1942, Mary’s granddaughter Agnes Blair Boyd Wood & Andrew Wilson were married very near Mary’s home.31  Two years later, Agnes & Andrew would welcome their first child, a girl.  A girl who is now an older woman.  A LIVING, older woman.

living child count: 1

living grandchild count: 2

living great-grandchild count: 1

 

One last death

 

Four years later, Mary would lose her husband of fifty-four years, William Wood, on 31 July 1948.32  His cause of death was listed as “senile changes”.  Merciful?  Possibly.

Mary Brown would live for nearly seven years without her husband.  Seven years with only ONE of her eleven children.  But seven years with the hope of a future for her posterity as those 3 precious grand, and great-grandchildren continued to LIVE.

1955 began in sorrow for Hugh Brown Wood as his mother Mary died on 1 January in his home.33  Just like her husband William, Mary’s cause of death is listed as “senile changes”.  Merciful?  I hope so.  I would not normally feel peace about the indignity of death to Alzheimers/dementia, but in Mary’s case, I hope she was transported back to that decade of joy when her family only grew and she had 7 children living.  I hope that on her bad days, Hugh & Martha never reminded her of the tragedies she experienced over and over and over again.  I hope they let her live blissfully in any happy memories she found in those last days.

A little more than two years after Mary’s death, her only child to outlive her, Hugh, would die of coronary thrombosis on 11 April 1957.34  I am so glad for Mary’s sake, that Hugh’s heart held out until after Mary had passed.

 

Grappling to understand

 

How did one woman survive so much loss?

I cannot begin to imagine what that was like.

I feel raw.  The realization of the sorrows of Mary’s life is new for me.  Her pain ended more than 62 years ago, but I discovered one horrifying record after another in very quick succession.  Every part of me aches for Mary.  I will probably ache for a while.  But I imagine she made peace with it all either near the end of her life or in her joyous – and LARGE – reunion after her death.

I don’t want Mary to feel even a moment more of the pains of her life, but I hope that she knows I am feeling pain for her suffering.  I hope she knows that I discovered not only her missing babies, but also the immense sorrow of her many, many losses.  I don’t know what it feels like to be in Heaven, but if my telling of her story brings anything to her today – I hope it is a sense of being loved, understood, honored, respected, and revered.

Mary now holds a very special place in my heart.  I will carry her with me for all of my days.

 

My very dear cousin Mary, I hope you are experiencing peace and joy you could never have anticipated during your painful journey through mortality.

 

 

 

note: It is possible that William and Mary had additional children, grandchildren, and great-grandchildren.  They have been carefully searched for and not found.  Grandchildren and great-grandchildren are more difficult to identify without the help of living descendants.  If you are a descendant of Mary, I welcome your input and contact – amberlysfamilyhistory {@} yahoo {dot} com.

 

 


  1. Scotland, “Statutory Deaths 1855-2016,” database, Scotlands People (http://www.scotlandspeople.gov.uk : accessed 14 July 2009), death entry for Andrew Brown, 25 September 1881, Hamilton in Lanark; citing Statutory Registers no. 647/00 0351. 
  2. Scotland, “Statutory Marriages 1855-2017,” database, Scotlands People (http://www.scotlandspeople.gov.uk : accessed 7 January 2018), marriage entry for William Wood and Mary Brown, 1894, Bothwell in Lanark; citing Statutory Registers no. 625/1 4. 
  3. Scotland, “Statutory Births 1855-2017, ” database, Scotlands People (http://www.scotlandspeople.gov.uk : accessed 7 January 2018), birth entry for Alexander Wood, 1894, Bothwell in Lanark; citing Statutory Registers no. 625/1 90. 
  4. Scotland, “Statutory Deaths 1855-2017,” database, Scotlands People (http://www.scotlandspeople.gov.uk : accessed 7 January 2019), death entry for Alexander Wood, 1895, Bothwell in Lanark; citing Statutory Registers no. 625/1 41. 
  5. Scotland, “Statutory Births 1855-2017,” database, Scotlands People (http://www.scotlandspeople.gov.uk : accessed 31 January 2018), birth entry for William Wood, 31 October 1895, Bothwell in Lanark; citing Statutory Registers no. 625/1 393. 
  6. Scotland, “Statutory Births 1855-2017,” database, Scotlands People (http://www.scotlandspeople.gov.uk : accessed 31 January 2018), birth entry for John Wood, 20 November 1897, Cowie near Bannockburn in Stirling; citing Statutory Registers no. 488/02 0151. 
  7. Scotland, “Statutory Deaths 1855-2016,” database, Scotlands People (http://www.scotlandspeople.gov.uk : accessed 14 July 2009), death entry for Janet Brown, 16 February 1899, Bothwell in Lanark; citing Statutory Registers no. 625/01 0050. 
  8. Scotland, “Statutory Births 1855-2017,” database, Scotlands People (http://www.scotlandspeople.gov.uk : accessed 31 January 2018), birth entry for Hugh Brown Wood, 14 July 1900, Cowie, near Bannockburn in Stirling; citing Statutory Registers no. 488/2 114. 
  9. Scotland, “Statutory Births 1855-2016,” database, Scotlands People (http://www.scotlandspeople.gov.uk : accessed 8 January 2018), birth entry for Annie Wood, 1 September 1902, Cowie in Bannockburn in Stirling; citing Statutory Registers no. 488/2 171. 
  10. Scotland, “Statutory Births 1855-2016,” database, Scotlands People (http://www.scotlandspeople.gov.uk : accessed 30 January 2018), birth entry for David Wood, 27 October 1904, Cowie near Bannockburn in Stirling; citing Statutory Registers no. 488/2 219. 
  11. Scotland, “Statutory Births 1855-2017,” database, Scotlands People (http://www.scotlandspeople.gov.uk : accessed 31 January 2018), birth entry for Edward Brown Wood, 20 September 1907, Cowie, near Bannockburn in Stirling; citing Statutory Registers no. 488/2 285. 
  12. Scotland, “Statutory Births 1855-2017, ” database, Scotlands People (http://www.scotlandspeople.gov.uk: accessed 7 January 2018), birth entry for Alexander Wood, 1910, St Ninians in Stirling; citing Statutory Registers no. 488/1 134. 
  13. Scotland, “Statutory Deaths 1855-2017,” database, Scotlands People (http://www.scotlandspeople.gov.uk : accessed 7 January 2019), death entry for Alexander Wood, 1910, St Ninians in Stirling; citing Statutory Registers no. 488/1 53. 
  14. Scotland, “Statutory Births 1855-2017,” database, Scotlands People (http://www.scotlandspeople.gov.uk : accessed 7 January 2019), birth entry for Janet Wood, 1911, St Ninians in Stirling; citing Statutory Registers no. 488/1 252. 
  15. Scotland, “Statutory Deaths 1855-2017,” database, Scotlands People (http://www.scotlandspeople.gov.uk : accessed 7 January 2019), death entry for Janet Brown Wood, 1912, St Ninians in Stirling; citing Statutory Registers no. 488/1 166. 
  16. Scotland, “Statutory Births 1855-2017, ” database, Scotlands People (http://www.scotlandspeople.gov.uk : accessed 7 January 2018), birth entry for Mary Wood, 1913, St Ninians in Stirling; citing Statutory Registers no. 488/1 356. 
  17. Scotland, “Statutory Deaths 1855-2017,” database, Scotlands People (http://www.scotlandspeople.gov.uk : accessed 7 January 2018), death entry for Mary Wood, 1915, St Ninians in Stirling; citing Statutory Registers no. 488/1 2. 
  18. Scotland, “Statutory Births 1855-2017,” database, Scotlands People (http://www.scotlandspeople.gov.uk : accessed 7 January 2019), birth entry for Mary Wood, 1915, St Ninians in Stirling; citing Statutory Registers no. 488/1 347. 
  19. https://www.cwgc.org/find-war-dead/casualty/737696/wood,-william/ 
  20. Scotland, “Statutory Marriages 1855-2016,” database, Scotlands People (http://www.scotlandspeople.gov.uk : accessed 27 January 2018), marriage entry for John Wood and Ellison Lough, 18 August 1917, Plean near St Ninians in Stirling; citing Statutory Registers no. 488/01 0039. 
  21. Scotland, “Statutory Marriages 1855-2016,” database, Scotlands People (http://www.scotlandspeople.gov.uk : accessed 27 January 2018), marriage entry for Peter Wilson Lister and Ellison Hutchison Wood, 25 November 1921, Cowie near St Ninians in Stirling; citing Statutory Registers no. 488/01 0076. 
  22. Scotland, “Statutory Marriages 1855-2016,” database, Scotlands People (http://www.scotlandspeople.gov.uk : accessed 31 January 2018), marriage entry for Hugh Brown Wood and Martha Blair Dean Boyd, 31 December 1921, Falkirk in Stirling; citing Statutory Registers no. 479/ 13. 
  23. The actual record for this birth is too recent to purchase and view, but the item is easily located on Scotlands People because of the uniqueness of the name: WOOD AGNES B BOYD F 1922 488/1 186 St Ninians. 
  24. Scotland, “Statutory Deaths 1855-2017,” database, Scotlands People (http://www.scotlandspeople.gov.uk : accessed 28 January 2018), death entry for Annie Wood, 22 November 1923, Bannockburn near St Ninians in Stirling; citing Statutory Registers no. 488/1 108. 
  25. http://www.scottish-places.info/features/featurefirst89859.html 
  26. Scotland, “Statutory Deaths 1855-2016,” database, Scotlands People (http://www.scotlandspeople.gov.uk : accessed 31 January 2018), death entry for Hugh Brown Wood, 11 April 1957, Bannockburn, near St Ninians in Stirling; citing Statutory Registers no. 488/1 30. 
  27. Scotland, “Statutory Deaths 1855-2016,” database, Scotlands People (http://www.scotlandspeople.gov.uk : accessed 31 January 2018), death entry for Edward Brown Wood, 15 February 1925, Orwell in Kinross; citing Statutory Registers no. 463/ 5. 
  28. Scotland, “Statutory Deaths 1855-2016,” database, Scotlands People (http://www.scotlandspeople.gov.uk : accessed 30 January 2018), death entry for David Wood, 14 December 1930, Plean in Stirling; citing Statutory Registers no. 488/1 104. 
  29. Scotland, “Statutory Deaths 1855-2016,” database, Scotlands People (http://www.scotlandspeople.gov.uk : accessed 31 January 2018), death entry for Hugh Brown Wood, 17 May 1934, Stirling in Stirling; citing Statutory Registers no. 490/ 161. 
  30. Scotland, “Statutory Deaths 1855-2016,” database, Scotlands People (http://www.scotlandspeople.gov.uk : accessed 31 January 2018), death entry for Mary Wood, 29 May 1934, Fallin near St Ninians in Stirling; citing Statutory Registers no. 488/1 77. 
  31. Scotland, “Statutory Marriages 1855-2016,” database, Scotlands People (http://www.scotlandspeople.gov.uk : accessed 31 January 2018), marriage entry for Andrew Wilson and Agnes Blair Boyd Wood, 24 April 1942, Stirling in Stirling; citing Statutory Registers no. 490/ 108. 
  32. Scotland, “Statutory Deaths 1855-2016,” database, Scotlands People (http://www.scotlandspeople.gov.uk : accessed 31 January 2018), death entry for William Wood, 31 July 1948, Fallin near St Ninians in Stirling; citing Statutory Registers no. 488/1 69. 
  33. Scotland, “Statutory Deaths 1855-2017,” database, Scotlands People (http://www.scotlandspeople.gov.uk : accessed 7 January 2019), birth entry for Mary Wood, 1955, St Ninians in Stirling; citing Statutory Registers no. 488/1 1. 
  34. Scotland, “Statutory Deaths 1855-2016,” database, Scotlands People (http://www.scotlandspeople.gov.uk : accessed 31 January 2018), death entry for Hugh Brown Wood, 11 April 1957, Bannockburn, near St Ninians in Stirling; citing Statutory Registers no. 488/1 30. 


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Photograph Showcase: Leaving California and The Coffee Cup

 

DUVAL, Deane and Francis Duane, leaving California - edited

Deane & Frank Duval

 

My great-grandparents were adventurous at a time when being adventurous kept your family fed.  They traveled around with their little family of four, working where they could find a job, and leaving when the job ended or they needed more – more opportunity, income, etc.  Eventually, they settled in Spokane, Washington and started a photography studio in their home.  But before settling down was what seemed best, one of their stops was in Pacific Beach, California.

According to their daughter, my Grandma, as they were traveling through California, they stopped and her dad decided it was a great place for a restaurant.  So for a time, they owned and ran The Coffee Cup.  This photo taken in front of The Coffee Cup has a simple inscription on the back:DUVAL, Deane and Francis Duane, leaving California - back

Leaving California.

As I have studied the photos from this time period and gone over my notes I am a little bit puzzled.  Was the Coffee Cup in Pacific Beach or in a different part of California?  This photo doesn’t look very much like the San Diego I am familiar with.  Also, there are photos of my Grandma in Pacific Beach that seem to be taken well after this photo.  Did they make two California stops?  I really wish that simple inscription contained one very important detail – the date!  😉

Oh well, I imagine as I continue going through photos, the timeline will become more clear.  So for now, I am going to enjoy this awesome photograph of my Grandma and her younger brother sitting atop their trailer in front of their little restaurant as they leave it behind in search of the next adventure in their journey.

My great-grandparents were such excellent photographers!  They gave me no end of photos to stare at, wonder about, and puzzle over.

I am so grateful.

 

Happy Thursday, I hope you make a fantastic genealogy discovery today!  If not, maybe label a photo or two so your great-granddaughter won’t be left to wonder.  🙂

 

 


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Advice Please ❤️

FullSizeRender

I have finished filing thousands of precious letters between my grandparents, as well as letters from my great grandparents, extended family, and friends to my Grandpa during WWII and my grandparent’s respective missions.

I have begun scanning and transcribing.  What a joy!

But I am struggling with a few decisions.

Should I post the letters here or on their own blog?  I haven’t counted the letters, but there are thousands.  If I post them here, how should I alter my posting schedule?

Should I include everything?  My Grandma wrote the word destroy on a few of the envelopes.  You see, she inadvertently “Dear John”ed my Grandpa and was extremely embarrassed by that.  It wasn’t something she talked about.  Ever.  But my Grandpa told me all about it.  How do I handle those letters with respect to both my Grandma’s feelings and honoring the truth of their story?  (I really don’t think she had a reason to be embarrassed, it all worked out just fine in the end.)

Then there are a few letters written by Grandpa’s friends that don’t exactly paint the letter writers in the best light.  Do I include those?

Oh boy!  So many decisions.

So, I have a little survey here with these questions.  Feel free to answer on the survey or in the comments or both.  I would love any feedback that might help me choose a path forward.

 

Thank you!

 

 

 


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Major Milestone Right Here!

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IMG_7881

Last week I filed and filed and filed letters.  Do you know what a treat it is to open letter after letter and see your grandparents handwriting?  To touch the pages they touched?  To hear their sweet and enduring love for each other?  It was completely joyful for me.

I am soooooo happy to say that I filed every single letter for the 5 1/2 years they wrote to each other!  Ten Hollinger boxes filled with letters.

(Of course, I still have the letters from the 1960s when my Grandpa was in graduate school.  But we won’t even think about those yet.)

As soon as I finish scanning Aunt Vera’s scrapbook – these letters are next on deck for scanning.  I think they deserve their own blog.  Maybe this fall.  😉

IMG_7886

These four boxes were mostly full on Wednesday when I started.  They look so beautiful empty, I might just leave them on my table for a day to enjoy their tender place in my heart.

 

Happy Monday, I hope you conquer a special genealogy project sometime this year – it is an incredible feeling!

 

 


27 Comments

Give Your Precious Photos Source Citations Too

photos need citations too-01

Have you ever found a photo on a public tree or website?  One that MIGHT be a photo of someone in your tree?  A photo you have never seen before, and maybe the only photo you have ever seen of someone?

I have.

In fact, one of my most tantalizing photo finds still vexes me.  Are you wondering why a photo find would vex me?  Let me tell you all about it.

Francis Cyprien & Alice Hyde DUVAL

Francis Cyprien & Alice Hyde DUVAL

That man up there is my 2nd great grandfather, Francis Cyprien Duval.  He was born in Rimouski, Québec to a long line of French folk who had lived in Québec for a few centuries.  He was the first in that direct line to leave Québec.  He settled in Alaska and married Alice and then they moved around a bit before finally settling in Lynn Valley, BC where Francis died.  We have a few scant family notes about his parents and siblings.  I knew his parents names and that they also left Québec and were buried in Blind River, Ontario.  I had a small handful of first names of some of his siblings and just a few other facts.  Because he is one of my immigrant ancestors, I feel very fortunate to have a small collection of photographs of him.  Enough in fact, that his image is well established in my family history.  Plenty of the photos are labeled and were labeled by his children.  That means that I trust that I know what he looks like and that those labels are accurate.

There is one other important reality because he was an immigrant – I have no photos, stories, and other artifacts for the family he left behind and never saw again.

So imagine my sheer delight when I came across this photo on Ancestry.com:

Screen Shot 2017-05-20 at 6.01.34 PM

This photo is tagged to the parents, sister, niece, and grand-nephew of my 2nd great grandfather Francis Cyprien Duval as he appears in another Ancestry.com user tree.  You will notice that the original poster included the names of each person in the description of the photo – bonus points for that.  You will also notice that it has been saved to several trees (including mine).

So why does this photo vex me?

Well, I have never seen a photo of Alexis/Alexander Duval & Marie Louise Demers anywhere else.  I have nothing to compare this image to.  When I came across it, I messaged the person who posted the photo and asked about the provenance of the photo.  Who had it, how she got it, how she knew for sure that it was a picture of who she said it was a picture of.  Before I basked in the deliciousness of finding a photo of ancestors for whom I do not have a photo, I wanted to make sure this photo was really a picture of my 3rd great grandparents.  I wanted to be as certain as was possible before I called it good and saved it to my tree.

The poster of said photo was very kind, and busy, and said she would get back to me after she returned from a trip.  Totally understandable.  Despite some communication after the trip, I have been unable to acquire the information I am seeking.

I look at this photo and want so much for it to be what it is proclaimed to be.  I see features of my Grandma in their faces.  I really want to call it good.  I want to tell everyone in my family about this cool find.  But it vexes me.  I don’t completely trust it.

You have probably come across a few photos that you hoped were labeled correctly too.  For me, it mostly happens when I am researching collateral relatives – siblings of ancestors, siblings-in-law of ancestors, cousins, etc.  Often I am researching these extended family members to help me take my tree further back.  But in doing this research, I can’t help but feel connected to these aunts, uncles, and cousins.  So when I come across an image of them – I love it!  It feels like a little treat at the end of the journey of learning about their life and how they were connected to my other family members.

But just like the possible photo of my 3rd great grandparents, I don’t completely trust a photo that isn’t labeled well.

 

So how can you give a photograph a good citation?  How can you help extended family members know that this photo you have shared is attributed to the right people?

 

 

I know that Evidence Explained contains a model for citing a photograph.  I’m sure the instructions are excellent and accurate.  I should really buy that book, but I haven’t.  So here are my tips for giving a photo a good citation based on my experience dealing with thousands of photos I have inherited from both sides of my family.  Let’s use an actual photo of my grandparents to help us.

 

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Your photo deserves a descriptive title.  It doesn’t have to be long, it just needs to be somewhat descriptive.  A good title should includes names and a date or event name.  i.e. “Ronald Peterson and Margaret Ellis, photo when Ronald had leave”.  If I have lots of photos of Ronald and Margaret – which I do – I want the title to be unique to the photo.

Your photo also deserves a detailed description.  You may not know every detail, but include anything you do know.  There are several important details to try to include:

  • Who is in the photo.  Use the “front row, l-r: and back row, l-r:” style to help make sure everyone is identified.  For this photo, I can stick with the names – Ronald Peterson and Margaret Ellis – since they are the only people in the photo.
  • When the photo was taken.  List the date or approximate date of the photo.  If you don’t know the date, you probably know a date range or time period, include that.  The next generation will know even less than you do, so help them out.  I don’t know the exact date of the photo, but I know it was taken while my Grandpa was serving in the Marine Corps.  He served from 1944-1946.
  • Where the photo was taken.  This can be trickier if the photo predates you.  In the case of my photo, I know that this photo would most likely have been taken in front of one of their homes because his leave was short – 24 or 48 hours long – and he hitchhiked from Colorado to Ogden, Utah.  He was only able to be there for a few hours before he had to start back.  I know what the front of Ronald’s family home looked like and this home is not a match.  I know that I have photos of Margaret’s family home somewhere that I could compare the photo to, I’m just not sure where they are (remember, I have thousands and I’m still working on scanning and organizing).  So I would probably note this photo as possibly being taken in front of the Ellis family home.
  • The provenance of the photo.  How did the photo make it to you?  How do you know the facts of the photo?  Who labeled it?  Why would they have known who is in the photo?  This can be simple or detailed, but this part is probably the most important part of your description.  In my case, this photo was part of my Grandmother’s collection.  The photo itself was not labeled, but there are hundreds of other photos of both Ronald and Margaret that are labeled in her collection.  The details surrounding this photo were told to me by my dad.  That is an important piece of information because someone else may remember the details differently and question my description.  Knowing who gave portions of the description helps other family members weigh the differences between my description and their memory or the memory of other relatives.

 

So, what would my title and description be for this photo?

 

Title:  Ronald Peterson and Margaret Ellis, photo when Ronald had leave

Description:  Ronald Peterson and Margaret Ellis.  Photo taken in Ogden, Utah, possibly in front of the Ellis family home (more work needed to establish location) when Ronald was home on leave.  Ronald served in the Marine Corps from 1944-1946.  Their son Kent shared the following details – “Ronald was given a short 24 or 48 hour leave.  He wanted to go home and see his family and his girlfriend.  He hitchhiked and only had a few hours to spend with loved ones before he had to head back to Colorado.”  This photo comes from the collection of Margaret Ellis that is in the current care of her granddaughter Amberly Peterson Beck.

 

This photo is a family favorite, so taking time to be a bit more detailed is important to me.  However, our time as genealogists is precious and limited.  We can’t spend this much time on every single photo ever taken of all of our loved ones.

 

So, when should you be this precise?

 

  • When a photo is the only one or one of just a few of a person.  The more rare a photo, the more details we want to include – especially about the provenance.
  • When the photo has special significance like the photo of my Grandma and Grandpa from the example.  My Grandparents treasured this photo and we have all in turn treasured it.  The next generation of my family deserves to know the special details of the photo.  What makes a photo special is up to you.  Is the event special?  Is the combination of people in the photo special?  Is it just a favorite photo?  Whatever the reason it is special to you, make sure the description reflects the import of the photo for future generations.

 

Let’s look at one more example of a photo I added to FamilySearch:

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This photo was in an album my Grandmother created.  She labeled it with only the names, Beth Christensen and Margaret.

(Hmmm… I would like to point out that the home looks an awful lot like the home in the background of the photo of my Grandparents.  I think I was onto something in guessing it was taken in front of the Ellis home.)

It took a little bit of work for me to figure out who Beth Christensen was.  There were no photos of Beth in FamilySearch at the time, so I added this and two others.  My title and description are pretty simple.  I did them quickly, but because there were no other public photos of Beth, I wanted anyone who viewed the photo to know enough about where the photo came from, to trust that the image was really of Beth.  I chose to include the detail of who Beth and Margaret’s common ancestors are because they are not in the same generation.  They are 1st cousins, once removed.

My title and description aren’t quite as good for this photo – but I felt like they covered what was most important, based on what I knew.

 

So next time you post a photo to a public tree or website, spend an extra minute giving your photo a good citation.  Help your extended family members out.  Tell them who, when, where, the provenance of the photo, and any other special or important details surrounding the photo or people in the photo.  Your family members will thank you!

 

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