thegenealogygirl


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Does baby Dorothy belong in my tree?

gg - george eliot quote

Francis Cyprien Duval & Alice Hyde are my 2nd great grandparents.  They are pictured above with four of their five children who survived birth and infancy.  Their oldest son, Francis Henry (back left), is my great grandfather.

I have known about 5 of their children for years.  Slowly I have been finding little tid-bits that indicate there were additional children.

These are the five children who are well known to me:

  • Annie Marie Elvera Duval, 1899-1979
  • Francis Henry Duval, 1901-1996
  • Leon Howard Duval, 1907-1941
  • Dolores Lenore Duval, 1909-2005
  • Alexander Valmore Duval, 1916-1997

Notice the gaps?  Six years between Frank and Leon, and seven years between Dolores and Valmore.  Those are pretty big gaps for a Roman Catholic like Francis Cyprien Duval.

For a few years now I have known of two other children.  The first is a baby boy who was not named.  He was born and died on 15 February 1915 in North Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada.

The second child is referenced in the 1910 census for the family while they are living in Fairbanks, Alaska.  Alice is listed as the mother of 5, with 4 living.  That means that there is a child who was born and died prior to 10 February 1910.

So my revised list of children looks like this:

  • Annie Marie Elvera Duval, 1899-1979
  • Francis Henry Duval, 1901-1996
  • Unknown Duval, born and died prior to February 10, 1910
  • Leon Howard Duval, 1907-1941
  • Dolores Lenore Duval, 1909-2005
  • Baby Boy Duval, 1915-1915
  • Alexander Valmore Duval, 1916-1997

It seems likely that the child I learned of from the 1910 census belongs between Frank and Leon in that 6 year gap, but that is just speculation.

It now appears there may be an additional child.

 

A baby girl named Dorothy.

The Western Call, a BC newspaper, has a death and funeral announcement found in their 14 October 1910 issue that reads:

DUVAL

The death took place Wednesday morning of Dorothy, the infant daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Frank Duval, corner of Twenty-sixth avenue and Martha street.  The funeral was held Thursday morning at 9.30 o’clock from the residence, Rev. G. A. Wilson Officiating.

Could this Mr. and Mrs. Frank Duval be my Frank & Alice Duval?

Most likely.

 

I know from an interview of their son Frank in the late 1970s/early 1980s that Frank and Alice left Alaska sometime after Alice’s father Henry died in 1907.  They were still in Fairbanks when the 1910 census was taken in February of that year.  I know that after they left Fairbanks they lived in Vancouver for a short time before moving to Lynn Valley, BC where they all lived until sometime after Francis Cyprien Duval’s death in 1919.

So once again, I revise my list of children for Frank and Alice:

  • Annie Marie Elvera Duval, 1899-1979
  • Francis Henry Duval, 1901-1996
  • Unknown Duval, born and died prior to February 10, 1910
  • Leon Howard Duval, 1907-1941
  • Dolores Lenore Duval, 1909-2005
  • Dorothy Duval, died 12 (or 11th) October 1910
  • Baby Boy Duval, 1915-1915
  • Alexander Valmore Duval, 1916-1997

Does baby Dorothy belong in my tree?

 

I think so.  I need more records to be sure.

But now I am wondering… how many other children are missing?

 

 

Note:  THANK YOU to Teresa from writing my past for suggesting I check out this BC newspaper site where I found the obit for baby Dorothy.  Of course that led me to additional searching including this site for BC City Directories.  I love the genealogy blogging community.  Our collective knowledge and sharing make genealogy SO MUCH better.  Thank you Teresa!

 

 


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Arthur & Mary Hyde

HYDE, Arthur, 1910, Fairbanks - edited by me

Arthur Hyde, according to his grand niece Vera Duval.

Last year, I wrote about some complicated inter-marriages in the Hyde & Whiteley branches of my tree.  Among other things I wrote, “And for just a dash of extra spice, Arthur was married in England with four children prior to his arrival in Alaska.  I don’t know what happened to his wife, but his children are alive and well and living with neighbors after he leaves England.  I have a theory about this.  But that is also a story for another day.”

Well, today is that day.

Arthur Hyde is my 3rd great granduncle.  He was born in about 1870 in Sheffield, Yorkshire, England to Henry Douglas McLenberg Hyde & Sarah Marsden.  I first learned of Arthur from family notes.

Currently I have found Arthur on the 1871 & 1881 census living at home with his parents and siblings in Yorkshire.

On 17 July 1889, Arthur married Mary Bell, daughter of Joseph Bell.  After their marriage they continued to live in Yorkshire for a time.  They can be found on the 1891 Census in Sheffield living with Arthur’s parents and their first child.  In 1901, they are living in Heeley with their children.

Together they had at least four children:

  • Ann Elizabeth Hyde, born 13 April 1890 in Sheffield.
  • Martha M Hyde, born about 1895 in Sheffield.
  • Rose Hyde, born about 1897 in Sheffield.
  • John Arthur Hyde, born about 1900 in Sheffield.

In 1910 Arthur appears on the US Census living in Fairbanks, Alaska with his widowed sister-in-law Alice Whiteley Hyde, both listed as single.  According to family notes, the two supposedly married in 1909 in Fairbanks.

Between 1909 and 1913, there are several newspaper articles about Arthur running races including marathons.

Arthur died 13 February 1919 in Colfax, Placer, California.

None of this explains what happened to Mary Bell and the four children.  Did Arthur and Mary divorce?  Did Mary die?  Why did Arthur move across the world and leave his children behind in England?

I have a big imagination.  In my imagining possible scenarios I have come up with this one:

When Henry returned to England to marry Alice Whiteley, what if Henry dazzled his brother Arthur with tales of Western Canada and Alaska.  The Hyde family were poor laborers.  Maybe Arthur and his wife Mary Bell, followed Henry to Alaska with plans to start a homestead or mine for gold.  Maybe they left the children in England until they could make their start.  And then something may have happened to Mary and Arthur remained in Alaska and never retrieved his children.  Part of the reason I dreamt up this theory is because of this photograph.

HYDE family, in Alaska

The woman in the center back is my 2nd great grandmother Alice Hyde.  The woman on the bottom right is her aunt/step-mother Alice Whiteley Hyde.  This photo is not labeled so I can’t be certain who the other three individuals are.  But I think that the man on the right is Alice Hyde’s father Henry Hyde, husband of Alice Whiteley Hyde.  Makes sense, right?  What if the man on the left is Arthur Hyde and that the woman on the bottom left is his wife Mary Bell Hyde?

But then my imaginary theory develops some holes.  First of all, I think this photo looks like it was taken prior to Alice Hyde’s marriage in 1897.  If I’m correct then Mary should be in England having babies with Arthur.  I suppose it’s possible they took a little journey to Alaska to visit Henry between their babies but that doesn’t seem likely.

So the photo may not support my imaginary explanation for Arthur seemingly abandoning his family but I haven’t yet turned over every stone.  Alice Whiteley Hyde completed the Fairbanks homestead that she and Henry started together.  But she completed it after Henry’s death, presumably with the help of Arthur.  In order to complete a homestead there is a whole lot of paperwork generated.  I intend to order the homestead paperwork and hope that I will find some more clues about Arthur in there.  I really hope he didn’t just abandon his little family.


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A Marrying Mess

Whiteley - Hyde

I’ve been failing at my goal to post each week.  I think it’s been about a month since my last post so I thought I’d try to make up for that with a bit of genealogical entertainment straight from my tree.  Welcome to the Whiteley and Hyde families Marrying Mess, complete with hand drawn flow chart – a good use of coloring time with my 3 year old.

Henry Hyde and Ann Whiteley are my 3rd great grandparents.  They married in Sheffield, Yorkshire, England in 1873 and moved to Canada.  Eleven years later, Ann died leaving Henry with two (possibly three) young girls to care for.  Ann died in November and Henry returned to England and married Ann’s sister Alice Whiteley in January.  He left his infant daughter Rosey with his parents and took his daughter Alice, his new bride Alice, and moved to Alaska.

Henry and Alice spent 22 years together before his death in 1907 in Alaska.  About two years after his demise, Alice married Henry’s brother Arthur.  Alice and Arthur spent about 10 years together before his death in 1919.

All of this I knew.  And I had known it for sometime.  But just last week I made some new discoveries that make this story even more interesting – and matrimonially messy.

After Arthur died, Alice lived with his brother Robert.  I’m not sure how long they lived together or what the nature of their relationship was, but in the 1920 census they are living together in Brush Prarie, Clark, Washington.

Sometime between the 1920 census and Robert’s death in 1928, it appears he may have married his niece Rosey Hyde – his first known marriage and her second of three.  Hmmmmm.  That is a story worthy of its own post.

Meanwhile back in England, Ann and Alice’s mother Eliza died leaving their father George Whiteley a widower.  George married Martha Marsden, his sons-in-law’s mother’s sister – his second marriage, her third.

And for just a dash of extra spice, Arthur was married in England with four children prior to his arrival in Alaska.  I don’t know what happened to his wife, but his children are alive and well and living with neighbors after he leaves England.  I have a theory about this.  But that is also a story for another day.

And there you have it – the Whiteley and Hyde families Marrying Mess – and what a beautiful mess it is!

Do you have any families in your tree that had multiple matrimonial connections?


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DIGGING IN in 2015

gg, DIG IN!

Happy New Year!

I learned a long time ago that I am much more likely to achieve my New Year’s Resolution if I only choose one.  I think it through and carefully select one DO-able goal that I think will have an impact on other areas of my life.  They are usually simple goals like floss every day, write in my journal every day, take a shower and get ready for the day before my husband leaves (that goal was set after my youngest was born).

This year is no exception.  I have chosen one loose resolution – I’m still working on defining it exactly.

Aside from my one New Year’s Resolution, I usually choose a few shorter term goals – goals in areas of my life that just need a bit of re-focus.

This year, one of those goals is about Family History.

In 2015 I have set the goal to post at least once each week on my blog.  Because, posting about my genealogy experiences definitely improves them.  I think things through more carefully if I write about them.  I make connections with people.  I learn from my readers.  I attract distant cousins who always enrich what I know.  I read what other people write about genealogy.  Blogging about genealogy has been good and I want a little more good in my genealogy life.

So that is my genealogy goal for 2015 – at least one blog post on here each week.

I have a Genealogy Wish List for 2015 as well:

  • Order the homestead papers for Henry and Alice Hyde.
  • Order the homestead application for Frank and Alice Duval.
  • Acquire the Estate record for Alice Hyde.
  • Order the Civil War Records for Landrie Brouillette & Seth Potter Maffit.
  • Make ANY kind of progress on John Costello – my great grandfather and SERIOUS brick wall.
  • Make a decision on a DNA test/company and have John Costello’s two living sons (in their 80s) take the test.
  • Buy a higher quality scanner.
  • Finish scanning the many photos Grandma gave me.
  • Clean out my hard drive.
  • Buy Dragon Naturally Speaking (is that what it’s called?) and use it to transcribe the interviews I have recorded.
  • Find someone to rescue the old cassette recordings my mom gave me to care for.
  • Order a handful of the long list of English records I want.  (Pricey)
  • Resolve the conflict in Family Tree on familysearch regarding my James Young, my 4th great grandfather.  This requires a surname study for the parish.  Two James Youngs married two Janet Robertsons two years apart and each had a son James Young.  Oy!
  • Prove or disprove that Landrie Brouillette and Emilie Fortin are the parents of Esther Brouillette.
  • Organize my family photos, documents, videos.  Make backups.
  • Participate in the 52 Ancestors challenge again.  (No pressure, just when it fits in.)
  • Join Daughters of Utah Pioneers.
  • Attend RootsTech.
  • Learn more about the Alaskan adventures of my family members.
  • Visit BYU and the FHL in SLC more often.

I could keep going and going.  But I know that setting ONE goal – writing one blog post each week – is DO-able and it will help me chip away at that big old list there.

So, how about it?

What is your ONE Genealogy goal for 2015?

I challenge you to set ONE goal and DIG IN!

PS – that super cool photo up there is my Great Grandpa Frank Duval.  Here it is with the back of the photo too.

Frank Duval, August 1938

Frank Duval,

Frank Duval, A-6- International Truck, Douglas’es Shovel a North West.  On Overpass at Shelby, Mont.  August 1938 [handwriting belongs to Frank’s wife Estelle Maffit Duval.]


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Alaska – My Fascination

In case you don’t already know, I am completely fascinated by my Alaskan roots.

Here’s a quick rundown.  My 3rd great grandfather Henry Hyde settled in Alaska sometime between 1885 and 1895.  He started a homestead but died before he could complete it.  His second wife, my 3rd great grandaunt (he married his first wife’s sister after wife number one died), Alice completed that homestead in 1918 – ten years after Henry’s death.  Henry’s daughter Alice was raised in Alaska.  She met her future husband, Frank Duval, when he got to know her father in Fairbanks.  She went to Dawson with Frank before the gold rush had started.  She was about fifteen, he was about thirty-two.  (?!)  They married in Dawson after the gold rush had mostly finished in November of 1897.  They started their own homestead in Fairbanks and lived there for many years, wintering in California.  They gave up their homestead before it was complete and moved to Vancouver between 1910 and 1911.

My great grandfather, Frank and Alice’s son, was raised in Alaska until he was about ten years old.  I recently listened to an interview my mom conducted with him in the early 80s.  Listening to this great grandfather that I knew and loved recount his Alaskan homestead stories made this branch of my family really come to life.

But then.

 

This summer I discovered the Discovery Channel show Alaska: The Last Frontier.  I watched the free season on Netflix.  I am in LOVE with this show!  I thought that hearing my great grandpa tell his stories made this branch of my tree come to life, but watching this show kicked it up a notch for sure.  Suddenly, I was thinking more of the everyday tasks, skills, hard work, and challenges that three generations of my family faced for several years.  As always, I have more questions.  Like how did Henry’s widow Alice complete that homestead?  Homestead work in Alaska is hard, like really hard.  I am so excited to order the homestead documents.   Hopefully they will give me more insight into their work and life in Alaska.

I love it when I find a book, film or other media item that helps me make a deeper connection with my ancestors.  Something that helps me understand their life just a little bit more.

How about you?  Have media items ever helped you understand your ancestors better?

 


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Still Here!

Carter & Harrison, bear lake, 2014

My little fellas, Bear Lake, 28 June 2014

I’ve been itching to get back to my blog – there are so many things I have to say, and so little time!  Here are a few of the big genealogy things that have been on my mind:

  • I created a fabulous mini book for our family reunion to help the great grandchildren learn more about our family.  It was awesome!  And even better, the kids loved it and worked on it.
  • Facebook groups for genealogy – which are your favorites?  They can be great and well, not so great.
  • FamilySearch indexing day was amazing.  I’m so impressed with their final numbers!  My two teenagers participated.  Can I just say I was completely surprised?  It turns out my 13 year old is pretty excellent at deciphering old handwriting.  Now I just need to figure out how to get him actually interested…  Did you join the fun?
  • Today is Pioneer Day.  I have lots of Mormon Pioneers in my tree.  Today is a tender day for me as I consider the many hardships they endured.  Last night my 13 year old offered our family prayer.  Among other things he said, “Please help us to remember the real meaning of Pioneer Day.”  Such a sweet moment for my mother heart.  I love this quote – “Can we somehow muster the courage and steadfastness of purpose that characterized the pioneers of a former generation?  Can you and I, in actual fact, be pioneers [today]?”  – Thomas S. Monson.  Do you have any Mormon Pioneers in your tree?
  • I have one more LARGE family reunion this summer.  I am one of the three people in charge.  I need to come up with some sort of activity, some family history type activity.  I have a few ideas brewing…
  • Who Do You Think You Are? started back up!  My favorite show.  Do you watch?
  • My family and I have discovered a new {to us} show on Netflix – Alaska The Last Frontier.  I am in love with this show because I have three generations in my family that were involved with homesteads in Alaska.  There were two homesteads, one was completed, one was not.  The one that was completed was started by my 3rd great grandfather Henry Hyde.  He died before it was completed so his wife Alice Whiteley Hyde completed it without him.  Watching this show has really opened my eyes to how difficult life is in Alaska.  I am gaining new respect and admiration for this part of my family with every episode I watch.

I’m still here, soaking up every bit of genealogy goodness I can find in the world.  See you in a few weeks!


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Ancestor Story – Ann Whiteley – 52 Ancestors

GoldenPhoto of Golden found here.

Ann Whiteley is my 3rd great grandmother.  Her life was much too short and ended sadly.  I don’t know a lot about Ann and I don’t have a picture of her.  I need to do some more research, but this is what I know right now.

From family records I have a birth date of 30 March 1857 in Sheffield, Yorkshire, England.  There are a few potential matches in the Free BMD.  I need to form an opinion and order the certificate I think is hers.  I also need to look in the parish register for her baptism record.

In 1861 she was living in Sheffield with her parents, George and Eliza, an older sister Martha and a younger brother George.  They lived at 34 Rockingham Street.

In 1871 she was not living with her family.  In fact, I haven’t found her yet.  Her parents lived very near where they lived in the previous census.  Household members included George & Eliza, and their children Martha, George, Samuel, and Alice.

Ann married William Henry Hyde(s) on 17 February 1873 in Pitsmoor, Sheffield, Yorkshire, England.  The marriage record lists her as a spinster with no occupation living in Pye Bank.

Sometime after their marriage, Henry & Ann set off for Canada.  Their daughter Alice was born in Ontario in 1880.  By 1884 they were living in or near Golden, British Columbia, Canada.  My great grandfather claims that Ann was the first woman to cross the Canadian Rockies in a prairie schooner.

Ann died 10 November 1884.  According to her death record, she was just 29 years old.  Assuming her birth date is accurate, she was actually only 27 years old.  Either age is much too young.

Her death record lists her cause of death as childbirth.  My great grandfather mentioned something in passing about her death being caused by having some sort of epileptic fit and falling on the stove.  Either way, she did give birth to a baby girl just three days before her death.  Family stories suggest that her husband Henry was away for work.  This certainly seems likely as the baby’s birth record was registered by the Doctor that attended both the birth of the baby and the death of Ann.  On the birth record, Henry is listed as Hyde with no first name and his occupation is teamster on the C.P.R. or Canadian Pacific Railway.  Ann’s death record was registered by the Sheriff.  I find it odd that the two events were registered by different people on the same day – 31 December 1884.  I can’t tell if they were registered at the same office.  One record is handwritten, the other is not.  They use the same format and the certificate numbers suggest they could have been registered in the same office.  And then about that baby – what happened to her?  I’ve written about her here.  I go back and forth between thinking she is Rosey and thinking she is not Rosey.  Did Ann have two daughters or three?  Family members say she had two, but I have learned time and again that this family discounts children who die young.  If the baby born 3 days before Ann’s death also died, maybe they wouldn’t count her.  Or if she was given away, that might also be a reason they would not count her.

Ann’s exact place of death is unclear.  Family records list her death place as Revelstoke District.  The death record does not list a death place.  The doctor who attended her, Dr. A. Sweat, lists his residence as Golden, British Columbia.  Revelstoke and Golden are 148 kilometers apart.  I can’t imagine Ann would have been attended by a doctor that lived that far away.  But I also can’t imagine there were very many doctors in that part of Canada at that time so maybe the Hydes really did live in Revelstoke and the doctor in Golden.  But then there is the added fact that Ann was buried in Golden.  If she had died in Revelstoke would they have taken her to Golden for burial?

Less than 2 months after Ann’s death, her husband Henry married her younger sister Alice in York, York, England.  As a fun twist, when Henry died in 1908, Alice married Henry’s brother Arthur.  Nice little tangle, eh?

I have more work to do here.  I look forward to further researching Ann and her family.  I find her short life sad and fascinating.

For the curious, here are a few records regarding Ann:

Marriage Record found on microfilm at the BYU Family History Library.

Marriage Record

Birth Record for unnamed daughter

Birth Record for unnamed daughter

Death Record

Death Record