thegenealogygirl


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The Mixed Up Case of the Two James Youngs & Janet Robertsons in Renfrewshire, Scotland

which James Young-01

In May of 2014, I had a happy breakthrough moment when I added another generation to my tree on my Young line in Scotland.  It was a major victory that had just been waiting there for me.  That discovery led to additional discoveries when I found parents for both James Young and Janet Robertson.  In just a few short weeks I had added two full generations and plenty of descendants.  It was exciting!

My excitement quickly came to a halt.

You see, I like to participate in building the Family Tree in FamilySearch.org.  So once I have researched a family well, I go into FamilySearch and try to update, source, add, merge, or whatever is needed, to help that Tree be as correct as possible.

When I went into the tree to add or attach James Young & Janet Robertson’s parents, I was faced with the most convoluted mess I’d come across yet.

This was my James & Janet with some of their children:

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Everything looked pretty good.  Some facts, sources, children, and grandchildren were (and still are) missing, but otherwise, this was all correct.

But then a troubling duplicate reared it’s head when I went looking for James Young and Janet Ferguson, James’ parents.  I found this:

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So what is the trouble exactly?  Oh goodness, where do I begin…

This James Young has the same birth and death dates and places as my James Young.  He also has parents with the same names as my James Young’s parents.  His wife also has the same name as my James Young’s wife.  His first two children listed have the same names, birth dates, and birth places as my James Young’s first two children.

But then.  There are problems.

The marriage date and place are different by two years and 1 parish.  This James Young’s wife Janet Robertson has a different birth date and place, and different parents from my Janet.  And, who are those last two children?  They don’t seem to belong to my James Young and Janet Robertson.

The more I tried to unravel this, the more confusing it was.  I started by looking at the marriage records for both couples.  I wondered if they were a duplicate couple who had banns read in a neighboring parish?  Had the record of the banns been indexed incorrectly?  It’s a pretty big stretch since the entire date is so drastically different, but I wasn’t going to rule it out.  Looking at all of the records – all four – made it quite clear that there were two couples.  One who married in Renfrew, Renfrewshire in 1823 and one who married in High Church, Paisley, Renfrewshire in 1821.

At this point I decided I needed to complete a surname study for both parishes.  For the next three years I slowly went through the microfilm records for these parishes every time I went to BYU to research.  I had a notebook.  Every event for someone with the surname of Young was recorded.  It was slow and tedious.  I didn’t have much time to give to it.  It felt like it would take forever.

But then!  Ohhhh, this is about to get good…

About six weeks ago, I started helping two different people with Scottish research.  I hadn’t been working on my Scottish lines recently.  I knew that the ScotlandsPeople website had been updated.  I’d gotten lots of emails about it.  I just hadn’t tried it out yet.  There were so many complaints about glitches at first, that I thought I would let the dust settle before I used it.  I had other parts of my tree to work on, so it was just fine.

As I helped these two different people discover the joys of Scottish research, it started an itch for me.  I wanted to work on part of my Scottish lines again.

One afternoon, about 4 weeks ago, I was zipping around my house getting stuff done.  I had the strongest impression that I should revisit one of my brick walls – Andrew Brown, my 4th great grandfather.  I dropped everything and gave it a look.  Over the next three days I completely demolished that brick wall and had the best time pushing my tree back several generations.  But that, is a story for another day.

As my Andrew Brown journey was winding down, I thought about my dusty notebook and my Young Surname Study.  It hadn’t gotten any attention for a few months.  ScotlandsPeople is so different now.  I thought I could probably complete the project from home now without having to buy too many records.  So I pulled out my notebook and got to work.

I am sooooo happy to say that on Tuesday, the 13th of June, 2017, I tackled the main goal of my Young Surname Study.  I had enough information to accurately separate the two James Young and Janet Robertsons and their children.  I carefully fixed everyone, sourced them, and made sure they are attached to the correct family members.  That Tuesday was a long and wonderful day.

Without going into too many confusing details, this is what I discovered.

The James Young who was attached to my James Young’s parents is a different man.  He did in fact marry a Janet Robertson in 1821 in High Church, Paisley, Renfrewshire.  But after that, there is no trace of either of them.  No children, no death records, no census.  I don’t know where they went.

The first two children – James Young b. 1824 and Thomas Young b. 1828 were actually the children of my James and Janet and were duplicates.

The daughter, Jean Young, who did not belong to my James Young and Janet Robertson, did not belong to this James Young and Janet Robertson either.  She is the daughter of John Walker Young and Janet Robertson who were married in 1828 in Neilston, Renfrewshire.  Her complete name is actually Jean Anderson Young and this little darlin’ has two birth and baptism records in two different parishes.  Luckily for me, the father’s unusual occupation of (Calico) Printer in Grahamston was listed on both of her records, along with the detail that she was the couple’s 2nd child and 2nd daughter.

The last son listed, Robert Young, was not the child of my James and Janet or of this James and Janet either.  He was the son of a James Young and Janet Robertson who married in Paisley, High Church, Renfrewshire in 1831, four years before his birth in the exact same parish and ten years after the marriage of the couple he was attached to.

In the end, this meant that the convoluted James and Janet were left with no birth and death dates and places for James, no children, no parents for James, and still attached to the parents for Janet.  Parents that I did not research, so I can’t say for certain they are in fact her parents.

My James and Janet are now attached properly to their children and parents.  Well, aside from the few children I haven’t fully researched and added yet.

My surname study is not complete.  There are still plenty of family members I need to finish researching.  But these are my big takeaways from my progress so far:

First – Don’t be afraid of a mess in FamilySearch.  You can solve it!  Even if it takes three years.  No one messed with the mess because I left a very detailed note on both James Youngs explaining my research project.  If you want to work effectively in FamilySearch – communicate!  Leave notes, sources, and good explanations when you make changes or additions.

Second – A surname study is an AWESOME way to really get to know a parish and a family or set of families.  You get a good sense of how many people live there and how they are connected to each other.  It took my best guesses, and some surprise people and facts,  and turned them into concrete conclusions.

Third – There are A LOT of James Youngs in the county of Renfrew in Scotland.  ūüėČ

 

Have you ever completed a surname study?  Would a surname study help your research?

 


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Creating Free, Beautiful Charts on TreeSeek

Adeline Perrault, 5.13.2017 fanchart

I love beautiful, informative charts.  I love them even more when they are free!  That lovely fan chart up there was created for free at TreeSeek.com, using information from FamilySearch.org.

In the center of that chart is Adeline Perrault, my 4th great grandmother straight up my maternal line.  I wanted to look at my tree based on only her ancestry to see where my holes are and make some decisions about where I may choose to research next.

Now, if you are thinking to yourself that you don’t use FamilySearch so creating that lovely chart is not an option for you, guess what? ¬†TreeSeek has you covered. ¬†You can create a chart from a gedcom file. ¬†If you don’t use a genealogy software program, but you do use an online tree service such as the one found at Ancestry.com, you can download a gedcom file of your tree to use on TreeSeek.

Let’s take a quick tour of TreeSeek and the chart options you have. ¬†When you go to TreeSeek.com you will see a landing page like this:

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Notice that in the center gray box you have two options: “Login now to create your chart” and “New! We now support creating charts with a GEDCOM file. ¬†Try now.” ¬†The login option will take you to a FamilySearch sign-in page.

Before we log-in, I want to point out that if you scroll down you will see some of the chart options available:

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After clicking the log-in option I am taken to a FamilySearch sign-in page.  If you are not a FamilySearch user, you will need to upload a gedcom file, your chart choices will be limited, but that beautiful 9 generation fan chart is available to you.

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After logging in I am given some quick options. ¬†Under “Starting Person”, there is a drop-down menu that currently has my name, Amberly Beck, showing. ¬†The other options I have automatically are: my husband, children, and parents. ¬†I can also choose anyone I like based on their 7 character PID number in FamilySearch. ¬†I simply type that PID number into the empty box to the right of my name. ¬†After selecting the start person, I choose my chart.

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Here is the complete list of chart types to choose from:

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I can name my chart if I like and select whether I want to include the siblings of the start person on the chart. ¬†Once I have made my selections, I click the green “Create Chart” button.

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Next, I will see this message as the chart is being created.

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Once the chart is complete it appears in a window like this:

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I can click the green “Download Chart” button to download this chart as a pdf. ¬†Once I have the file, I can save it as a jpeg if I like.

If you are not a FamilySearch user, you will click on the¬†“New! We now support creating charts with a GEDCOM file. ¬†Try now.” button.

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That will take you to this page:

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You will click the white “Choose File” button and then select your gedcom file from your computer. ¬†After your file has uploaded, you will see this:

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In the dropdown menu you will see a list of people in your gedcom file. ¬†They are organized generationally starting with you. ¬†I chose my great grandfather and a 9 Gen Fan, and then clicked “Create Chart”.

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Again, my chart shows up and I have the option to download the pdf file of the chart.

Here are a few other cool charts I was able to make.  These options are only available to FamilySearch users at present.

mixed first names cloud

Mixed first names in a name cloud from FamilyTree on FamilySearch, using me as the starting person.  This means this comes from my portion of the tree on FamilySearch.  Remember, no one has their own tree on FamilySearch.female first names cloud

Female first names in a name cloud.

male first name cloud

Male first names in a name cloud.

surnames name cloud

Surnames in a name cloud.

5 Generation Photo Family Chart

I think this chart is my favorite of all. ¬†It uses the profile photos I have selected for each person on FamilySearch. ¬†My parents are in the center with my brother and I beneath. ¬†I removed the names of anyone who is living, but those are also on the chart. ¬†I want to go in and update each person with the best photo of I have and create this chart again and frame it. ¬†It’s such a lovely visual for my children to really get to know our family tree. ¬†I also need to either remove my brother or add my other siblings. ¬†ūüėČ

One last note, these charts print up beautifully in very large sizes. ¬†They can be printed at any copy store. ¬†If you live near BYU, the BYU Family History Library has a wonderful fan chart printing service available for anyone to use. ¬†You can print a full color 24×18 poster print for $3.50 or a full color 24×36 poster print for $7.00. ¬†They are printed on a high quality, thick paper.

 

Have you used TreeSeek to create any charts?  Do you have another favorite service for creating charts?

 

Happy Wednesday, I hope you make a fantastic genealogy discovery today!

 

 


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Can you spare 30 minutes? – An Indexing Update

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Close up shot of me proudly wearing an indexing button at RootsTech 2016

In March I shared my 2017 goal to index 6,000 records.  I am so happy to report that one of the indexing projects I have been helping with is soooooo close to being finished!

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On the right side of this screenshot you can see the stats on the 1881 Canadian Census, Part B.  So far, 53,664 images are complete, 10 images are awaiting indexing and 6 images are awaiting arbitration.  (I am pretty sure that means that the 10 images that need to be indexed will be added to the final arbitration list once they are indexed.)

This has been a fun challenge for me to help with.  I have been researching my Qu√©bec ancestors for about 4ish years now.  It was so painfully slow at first.  I don’t speak French.  But now I can zip right through things that felt impossible four years ago.  I’m still not a French speaker by any means, but I do know how to read most French Genealogy records for Qu√©bec.  Helping with the 1881 Canadian Census – which is in French – has really helped boost my understanding of the language and of names that I don’t have in my tree but sometimes see as witnesses to events for my family.

When I started, my accuracy percentage was not great.  I didn’t understand the diacritics well at all.  I’m still no expert, but I have memorized the keyboard shortcuts to help me type them and can recognize them in sloppy handwriting quite accurately now.

I was able to index 2,075 1881 Canadian Census records!

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Now that the project is nearly complete, and there are no batches available to download, I have moved on to the 1856 France, Sa√īne-et-Loire Census.  It is stretching me even more.  I love it!

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My accuracy has gone way up.  There are occasional batches that are so hard to read and I get a surname wrong for a large family and my accuracy goes way down, but overall I’m doing pretty well at 97%.

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So far this year I have indexed 2,660 of my 6,000 record goal.  I’m a bit behind the pace I was hoping for but making progress.

Have you tried indexing?  If not, I promise there are plenty of English projects that need help.  Even a bunch of beginner projects.  FamilySearch is one of the many organizations you can index for.  They happen to be my preferred place to index because they provide their records freely to all.  If you have never indexed, check out the resources for indexers on FamilySearch.  The indexing page currently looks like this.

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I promise it is beginner friendly.

This infographic is a great summary of why indexing is so vital to genealogy.

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Have you indexed?  If so, who do you like to index for?

 

Do you have 30 minutes to spare?  If so, help “Fuel the Find” today by indexing one batch of records!

 

 


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FamilySearch Recipes

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During RootsTech, FamilySearch announced FamilySearch Recipes.  A portion of their website dedicated to preserving favorite family recipes.  What a fabulous idea!

Most of us have special recipes in our families, even if they are from the current generation. ¬†In my family, I have a few favorite recipes that come from my Grandma. ¬†There aren’t many, but the few I have are treasures. ¬†I have several of my own recipes that my family LOVES. ¬†I can’t get back the family recipes that have been lost to time, but I can be sure to preserve my own recipes for my children and the generations that will follow.

My oldest son is currently serving as a Missionary for our church. ¬†His 19th birthday is coming up. ¬†Missionaries don’t really need much. ¬†They move very frequently and live out of 2 large suitcases and 1 one carry-on suitcase. ¬†He doesn’t need more “stuff” for his birthday. ¬†But he could probably use a little dose of home.

So, for his birthday I created him this very detailed recipe of his favorite pasta:

lemon pasta, one file-01

And because I know he will most likely lose track of his laminated recipe cards at some point in his life, I also uploaded it to FamilySearch Recipes.

I included the background of this recipe:

In 2007 I had a cardiac ablation. Afterwards I developed a blood clot in my neck. It was very painful and I lost mobility in my neck and shoulders. I was stuck resting for a few weeks. During that time our next door neighbors were doing some remodeling in their kitchen. My sweet neighbor, and very good friend – Brooke, cooked dinner in our kitchen for both of our families for many days. One day she tried a new pasta recipe. I LOVED it. I kept meaning to ask her for the recipe. I never remembered to ask. We moved away and I still thought about that yummy pasta on occasion. I decided to try to recreate it. After many revisions, this was the end result. It has become a family favorite. It is fast and easy to make, light and delicious. My oldest son especially loves this pasta dish. For his 19th birthday – his first birthday as a missionary – I created this detailed recipe for him to follow.

Not only do I love this pasta because it is delicious, but I love it because it reminds me of my very dear friend and her loving service to me and my family. As a bonus, Brooke’s husband is my husband’s 3rd cousin. A fact we discovered several months after we became neighbors. ¬†ūüôā

 

I look forward to preserving additional recipes on FamilySearch Recipes.  Especially the few that come from my Grandma.  She made the best orange rolls!  That one needs to be preserved for sure.

 

Do you have any family recipes you want to preserve?

 

 


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Finding “Hidden” Records on FamilySearch

FamilySearch_Logo

If you are reading this, you are most likely familiar with searching for records on FamilySearch. ¬†What you may not be familiar with are three types of “hidden” records you can utilize on FamilySearch – images that aren’t indexed but are part of a partially indexed collection; browse collections; and digitized microfilm collections in the catalog.

Hidden Record Type 1:

Images that aren’t indexed but are part of a partially indexed collection. ¬†I will use some Qu√©bec¬†records as my example. ¬†Let’s start with the Qu√©bec¬†search page on FamilySearch:

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You will notice at the top of the page it reads, “Qu√©bec¬†Indexed Historical Records”. ¬†It is important to note that not everything in this list is completely indexed. ¬†As I scroll down the page I can see a list of Qu√©bec¬†records, which also includes larger collections that have Qu√©bec¬†records in them.

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Only a few collections are showing until I click “Show all 21 Collections”.

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As I scroll down the list, I am looking for any collection that has a camera beside it. ¬†That means there are images in the collection. ¬†Close to the bottom is a collection entitled, “Quebec, Catholic Parish Registers, 1621-1979”. ¬†It has a camera icon which means there are images in the collection and it lists that there are 79,535 indexed records in the collection. ¬†The question I have is, are there more records in the collection that aren’t indexed? ¬†I simply click on the collection to go to the search page.

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Once I am on the search page I scroll to the bottom. ¬†The collection has a browse option at the bottom that reads, “Browse through 1,399,175 images”. ¬†This means that in this collection of 1,399,175 images, there are a little over 1.3 million records that are not indexed. ¬†If I click that “Browse through 1,399,175 images” button, I can search the records like digital microfilm.

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I get this list of parishes to help me navigate the images.  I noticed one today that I have never seen before:

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How’s that for a parish name? ¬†ūüėČ

Here is a parish that I regularly search:

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I click on the parish name again and get this:

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Then I can click on one of the date ranges and get this:

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It is basically a digital microfilm. ¬†This particular collection is tricky to navigate because it contains such a large span of years and the years are written out like this “one thousand seven hundred forty seven”, except they are written in French. ¬†Despite it being a bit trickier to navigate, it is totally worth it. ¬†I get faster every time, it just takes a little practice.

Any collection that contains images has the potential to contain more images than indexed records.  If everything is indexed in a collection, you will not see the browse option at the bottom of the search page.  MANY indexed collections contain images that are not indexed.

Hidden Record Type 2:

Browse collections.  These collections are also accessed from a main search page.

We will go back to the Québec search page and scroll to the bottom.

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These collections are labeled as “Qu√©bec Image Only Historical Records”. ¬†Most locales have several of these browse collections. ¬†None of the records are indexed yet. ¬†I clicked on “Quebec Notarial Records, 1800-1920”.

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You will notice that I have no search box, just the “Browse through 4,956,093” images link. ¬†When I click that I am taken to this page:

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From here I can select a location, I chose Iberville:

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Then I choose a range of documents:

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Then I am once again looking at a digital microfilm.  This particular collection would be hard to use unless I have a time frame and location in mind for the record I am seeking.  That information would come from other good research.

Hidden Record Type 3:

Digitized microfilm collections in the catalog. ¬†This particular type of record is brand new to me. ¬†In fact, I have no idea when FamilySearch started doing this. ¬†They snuck it in recently. ¬†I discovered this record type while I was using microfilm at the FHL in SLC. ¬†I had a list of Estate Files I was looking for. ¬†I had found 6 and went looking for the 7th file when something wasn’t quite right. ¬†That led me to look at the catalog entry for the microfilm to double check the information I would expect to find. ¬†I thought maybe I had written the microfilm number down incorrectly. ¬†This is the page I went to:

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I scrolled down to find my microfilm number in the collection of 419 microfilm to see this list:

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Ummmmmm… see those little camera icons on the right?! ¬†This entire collection was digitized AFTER I had made my list of microfilm to search just shortly before going to the library. ¬†When I click the camera I get a digital microfilm that looks like this:

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What on earth?! ¬†When did FamilySearch start doing this??? ¬†The craziest part is that the images¬†aren’t on the South Africa search page, not in the same grouping you can find here.

So.

Check the catalog, and check it again, and check it again. ¬†I know that the rate of digitization far exceeds the rate of indexing but apparently FamilySearch can’t keep up with cataloging in an orderly fashion either?

One important last thought – FamilySearch often has images available that go away once the entire collection is indexed. ¬†If you find an image that is important to your research, PLEASE, don’t assume the image will always be there. ¬†Save a digital copy of that image.

And while we are on the subject of disappearing images, it is important to know that the contractual agreements that FamilySearch enters into with the owners of records can change at any time.  In fact, several collections that matter to me and my research are no longer available.  FamilySearch still holds the microfilm, but they are under lock and key because the contracts were renegotiated.

 

Have you been using these three types of “hidden” collections on FamilySearch?

 


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Unraveling the John Boles Mystery – Part Two

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Durban to The Drakensberg” by John Hone, 1988, photo of Durban, Natal, South Africa

John Boles is my 3rd great granduncle.  He is the younger brother of my 3rd great grandmother Catherine Boles.  John, his wife Christina, and his 7 living children who were all born in Scotland, just up and disappeared in 1890.

In 2014, a serendipitous connection with a kind stranger from Scotland, led me to an immigration record for all 7 Boles children traveling to Natal, South Africa without their parents.

Then there were the 3 marriage records for Elizabeth, Christina, & Helen Boles. ¬†All 3 marriages took place in Natal, South Africa. ¬†Helen’s 1906 marriage record stated that she had the permission of her parents to marry.

This was the first clue that indicated John & Christina Montgomery Boles might have also gone to South Africa.

I scoured FamilySearch and Ancestry looking for any record collection that might help me build on what I knew but I couldn’t find anything. ¬†The collections were sparse and had very limited time frames. ¬†I did some basic googling with no great results so I did what we all do at times, I set the John & Christina Boles family aside.

Fast forward to sometime last year, when I revisited this part of my tree.  I was committed to adding something to this story.  So I dove into some google searching to see what record collections exist for Natal, South Africa.  The National Archives for South Africa led me to a bunch of potentially helpful records.  The only problem was that they look like this:

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I wasn’t entirely sure where I could go next based on this data. ¬†So I went to my good friend, the FamilySearch wiki. ¬†But. ¬†I went to it through google. ¬†The wiki itself has a terrible search algorithm so it’s best to use google as your entry point. ¬†I found myself on a page entitled “South Africa Natal Death Notices“.

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Close to the bottom of that screenshot you can see the section “Microfilmed records at the Family History Library”. ¬†This link takes you to a catalog entry on FamilySearch.org for microfilms containing Estate Files for Pietermartizburg (Natal). ¬†The collection includes 419 microfilm reels organized by year and file number.

This discovery got me pretty excited so I searched the National Archives of SA website as thoroughly as I could to identify as many potential estate files for John, Christina, their children, and the 3 sons-in-law that I knew of.  I had quite a list.  I compared it to the FS Catalog entry to identify microfilm numbers.  My list of microfilms was growing.

My big question was this – What exactly will I find in those Estate Files?

 

When I go to BYU for research, I can order two microfilms from the FHL in Salt Lake City for free, every two weeks.  No more.  I was trying to decide how much of my precious research time to dedicate to this family.  Which films should I order?

While pondering on this set of questions, I discovered that there is a 5 year window of estate records available on FamilySearch in a browse only collection for Transvaal.  I checked this against my list and discovered one candidate: William Wise, husband of Christina Boles.

Hooray!  This meant I could view an estate file from home to get a sense of what this record type, for this location might tell me.  This was just what I wanted.

Because finding this particular record took several steps, I will outline those steps in detail.

The first step was finding William’s file number on the National Archives of SA website.

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I was looking for file number 3681 in the year 1959.

It was time to take that information over to FamilySearch. ¬†I went to the main “Search” menu on FamilySearch and got myself to the South Africa landing page that looks like this.

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Then I scrolled down to the bottom to find the browse collections.  These are collections that only have images with no index.  You search them like a digital microfilm.

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Then I selected the Transvaal Estate Files.

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From here, I clicked on “Browse through 191,580 images“.

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Then I selected the appropriate year of 1959.

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That led me to a screen filled with file number ranges.  My file number was further down the page so I scrolled down.

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I am looking for file number 3681 which falls into the very last number range of 3660-3736.  I clicked that range.

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Now I am essentially looking at digital microfilm. ¬†You can see that first image has a large stamped code of “3660/59”. ¬†I am looking for 3681 which is only 21 files later. ¬†I left this page on the “thumbnail” view and scrolled down until I could see the first page of file 3681.

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There is my file on the third row, far left. ¬†I can now click on the thumbnail to view the first image of my file. ¬†Then I click the little arrow in the black menu bar to arrow through the file. ¬†What I discovered was a 5 page estate file. ¬†Page one is the cover sheet. ¬†Page two is the death notice. ¬†Pages three and four are William and Christina’s will. ¬†Page five is “Acceptance as Trust of Executor”.

Just to give you a little taste, here is the death notice for William.

wise-william-1959-estate-file-2

From this record I learned so much new information! ¬†I added a birthplace in Scotland of Trenent, age at death in years and months (which helped me narrow down a time frame for birth), address at time of death, date and place of death, and the names of William and Christina’s 3 children (including their daughter’s married last name).

Finding this file got me really excited to see John and Christina’s Estate Files. ¬†I moved those microfilm right to the top of my BYU list. ¬†On my next visit I ordered both microfilm and hoped for the best!

Was I finally going to learn when and why John Boles went to South Africa?

 

…to be continued…


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Jerry, the Super-hero Indexer

gg, i heart indexers

In February of 2014 I wrote several posts all about indexing.  I even issued an indexing challenge.

Indexing is a vital part of the amazing increase in accessible genealogical records.  We ALL benefit from indexers.

I have always had a soft spot in my heart for indexers and their service.  But that soft spot grew to bursting this past November when I read an article about a man who had made it his goal to index 1 million records before he died.

Yep, you read that correctly, ONE MILLION records.

He didn’t quite make it.

His name was Jerry.  Jerry indexed 952,891 records before his death on 6 November 2016.

952,891 records!!!

 

Jerry’s family members are planning to index the remaining 47,109 records in his memory.

Well.

After reading that, my indexer-loving-genealogy-obsessed heart just couldn’t take the amazingness of Jerry’s service without rededicating itself to more indexing. ¬†I didn’t start out with any particular goal in mind, I just decided to index when it worked.

I am guessing that anyone who was conscious at the time, will remember the American turmoil that was going on the 6th of November 2016 and that still continues.  Because of all of that, I was watching the news A LOT more than usual, and still do.  Do you know what you can easily do while watching the news?  Index.

In November and December I indexed about 3,500 records.

When I looked at my stats recently I decided to set a goal for 2017 to index 6,000 records. ¬†I know it’s a far cry from a million, but it’s SO MANY MORE RECORDS than I usually index.

As a genealogist who relies on indexers, I express my deepest thanks to Jerry.  Thanks for his service and for his example and how it has inspired me.

Thank you Jerry!

 

Do you index?  If you want to join the party you can index for many different organizations.  Find one you like and pitch in.  Every little bit helps.

 

You can read more about Jerry here.

gg - indexing superhero - small

PS – This post is not meant to make any sort of political statement or imply anything about my own political leanings. ¬†I love people SO much more than politics. ¬†Vote however you feel comfortable, worry about the state of our nation however you choose, I love you for you, not for your voting preferences. ¬†ūüôā