thegenealogygirl


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FamilySearch Recipes

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During RootsTech, FamilySearch announced FamilySearch Recipes.  A portion of their website dedicated to preserving favorite family recipes.  What a fabulous idea!

Most of us have special recipes in our families, even if they are from the current generation.  In my family, I have a few favorite recipes that come from my Grandma.  There aren’t many, but the few I have are treasures.  I have several of my own recipes that my family LOVES.  I can’t get back the family recipes that have been lost to time, but I can be sure to preserve my own recipes for my children and the generations that will follow.

My oldest son is currently serving as a Missionary for our church.  His 19th birthday is coming up.  Missionaries don’t really need much.  They move very frequently and live out of 2 large suitcases and 1 one carry-on suitcase.  He doesn’t need more “stuff” for his birthday.  But he could probably use a little dose of home.

So, for his birthday I created him this very detailed recipe of his favorite pasta:

lemon pasta, one file-01

And because I know he will most likely lose track of his laminated recipe cards at some point in his life, I also uploaded it to FamilySearch Recipes.

I included the background of this recipe:

In 2007 I had a cardiac ablation. Afterwards I developed a blood clot in my neck. It was very painful and I lost mobility in my neck and shoulders. I was stuck resting for a few weeks. During that time our next door neighbors were doing some remodeling in their kitchen. My sweet neighbor, and very good friend – Brooke, cooked dinner in our kitchen for both of our families for many days. One day she tried a new pasta recipe. I LOVED it. I kept meaning to ask her for the recipe. I never remembered to ask. We moved away and I still thought about that yummy pasta on occasion. I decided to try to recreate it. After many revisions, this was the end result. It has become a family favorite. It is fast and easy to make, light and delicious. My oldest son especially loves this pasta dish. For his 19th birthday – his first birthday as a missionary – I created this detailed recipe for him to follow.

Not only do I love this pasta because it is delicious, but I love it because it reminds me of my very dear friend and her loving service to me and my family. As a bonus, Brooke’s husband is my husband’s 3rd cousin. A fact we discovered several months after we became neighbors.  🙂

 

I look forward to preserving additional recipes on FamilySearch Recipes.  Especially the few that come from my Grandma.  She made the best orange rolls!  That one needs to be preserved for sure.

 

Do you have any family recipes you want to preserve?

 

 


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Hello Friends!

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RootsTech was fabulous!

I have so much to say about so many things.  I’ll just start with a few headlines:

  • RootsTech.  Love, love, loved that experience once again.  So much learning!  If you didn’t watch LeVar Burton’s opening session, it is a must see.
  • My missionary son has been gone for 6 months on Friday.  It’s going so fast!  A few photos below.
  • A while back I wrote about a new church responsibility that was keeping me busy.  Well, it happened again.  Only this time I am serving in a busy calling with many, many children – my favorite.  The timing slowed me way down, about 7 weeks before my missionary left.  But I’ve got my sea legs and I’m trying to fit in some old loves once again – like blogging.
  • I have been organizing those piles of letters getting ready to start scanning.  Hooray!
  • I am about to foray into the DNA genealogy world.  I have several people I will be testing over the next few months.  Kits purchased, now it’s time to learn.  Please send any beginner tips you have my way.
  • I may not have been writing about family history, but I’ve still been doing plenty of it.  Which means I have many happy discoveries and tips to share.

 

Have a wonderful week, I hope you make a fantastic genealogy discovery today!

 


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Photograph Showcase – One More Family Photo

Ronald and Margaret Peterson family

The Ronald & Margaret Peterson Family, 1970

This family photo was taken just before my dad’s oldest brother went on an LDS mission.  It was one last family photo before the first child left home.  My dad is in the back row on the right with the big old sideburns.

Ronald and Margaret Peterson family, February 1981

The Ronald & Margaret Peterson Family, 1981

This family photo was taken just before my dad’s youngest brother left on an LDS mission.  One last family photo before the baby left home.  By this time there were three daughters-in-law, and plenty of grandchildren.

Peterson Family, 1981

The entire Ronald & Margaret Peterson Family, 1981

Look at all those granddaughters!  My brother is the only grandson in that photo.  After four sons, my grandparents had 12 granddaughters and 5 grandsons.  I am the little darlin’ in the front row on the far right.

I’m grateful that these lovely family photos survived and made their way to me.  I’m glad that my grandparents were able to have these photos taken to mark these occasions and remember.

I am planning to do the same for my little family.

As a side note, in my dad’s family of six, every single family member served an LDS mission.  Grandpa – New Zealand, Grandma – California, Uncle Mark – Uruguay, my Dad – Ohio, Uncle Miles – Japan, Uncle Blake – Japan.  Thinking about their service, and my son’s upcoming service, I am considering creating a chart of ancestor missions like the Ancestor Pedigree by Birth Locations.  And then that got me thinking that I should make one to reflect education levels, and one for who I have photos of, and one for who I have any type of recorded story of, and well, you know how that line of thinking goes.

 

Have a great weekend, I hope you make an amazing genealogy discovery today!


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Awesome Genealogy Interruption

Ryan with mission call copy

My oldest boy got a big white envelope in the mail yesterday containing a mission call!!  That envelope totally changed the rest of my day in a happy way.  If you are reading this you are most likely a genealogist and understand when I say I had some chores to do before the crowd arrived.  😉

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We had a map for everyone to guess where he might be going.  After everyone had arrived (lots and lots and lots of kids and some family members and neighbors) we called all the grandmas, grandpas, aunts and uncles that wanted to be on speaker phone and he opened his call.

My oldest son, that little 2 lb. 8 1/2 ounce baby, is going to spend two years in the Columbia, South Carolina Mission.  He will be teaching the gospel of Jesus Christ and serving the people of South Carolina.  He reports to the Missionary Training Center (MTC) on August 17th.

I do not know how to express my joy.  So many happy feels at my house!

If you are curious about what an LDS missionary does, this short video gives a great, basic explanation.

If you are curious about what Mormons believe you can learn a little bit here.

I hope your Friday is as joyful as mine!!


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Tell Me a Story – “So this is Margaret, so this is Margaret”

Tell Me a Story

Tell Me a Story Challenge :

Choose a person.  Then do any or all of the following:

  • Make a list of the top ten stories about this person, a word or phrase will do.
  • Choose one story and tell a compelling, short version that will interest your family members in one minute or less.
  • Tell a more detailed version of that story including photos if you have them.

Note:  You can read about my inspiration behind this challenge here.  I’ve decided to reverse the order in my post.  If you are reading this, you like stories so I’ll start with the full story, then the bite-sized story to hook my family members, then the list of ten stories.

 

Mary Margaret Ellis Peterson, looking left

My Grandma, Mary Margaret Ellis

My grandparents met and started dating in High School.  My Grandpa graduated at the height of WWII.  He knew he would be drafted so he enlisted in the Marine Corps right after graduation.  My Grandma wrote to him and waited for him.  She finished high school and went on to graduate from college (I think Weber College) with a degree in science.  My Grandpa served two years in the Marine Corps and then the war ended.  He was home for a time before he left for New Zealand on an LDS mission.

Grandma had been waiting for a long time.  She had enjoyed her high school and college days but she had more time to wait before Grandpa would be home.  She was 19 years old and she decided she wanted to serve an LDS mission.  She met with her local church leader and together they filled out mission paperwork and sent it into Salt Lake.

Her request was denied.  It’s totally understandable though.  At that time a woman had to be 23 to serve an LDS mission.  Well, she didn’t take no for an answer and sent in papers again, once again requesting to serve a mission.  And once again her request was denied.

She had just turned 20 years old when my Grandpa’s brother Darrell died.  She attended the funeral with her future in-laws.  She was invited to ride in the family car to the cemetery.  She was in the car when President David O. McKay walked up to it.  He greeted my great grandparents who introduced President McKay to my Grandma.  He took her hand in both of his and as they shook hands he said, “So this is Margaret… so this is Margaret.”

The very next week my Grandma received a mission call in the mail.  She was called to serve an LDS mission with one stipulation – she had to return home early.  She had to return home one month before my Grandpa so she could plan their wedding.  She was able to serve for about 14 months in the California mission.  In the many boxes she kept are photos from her mission and a few other items she saved including a letter from her mission president praising her hard work and love for the people in her mission.

My spunky Grandma was a missionary at a time when few women were serving missions and she did it 3 years younger than was allowed.  The more I learn about my Grandma the more in awe I am of her many talents and her great strength.

 

One Minute Story

My Grandma sent in mission papers twice when she was 19.  She was told she had to wait until she was 23 – the current minimum age for sister missionaries.  She met President David O. McKay just after her 20th birthday and got a mission call in the mail the next week.

 

Top Ten Stories List for Grandma

  • Cabbage Patch Dolls, Pound Puppies, can stools, quillos, and more!
  • The movie file
  • Identical feet
  • “You missed a B♭.”
  • Road map brain – travel map trip
  • Our last lunch
  • The Last Christmas Party
  • “I really need to write these things down…”
  • Pouring over her scrapbooks
  • Grandpa’s bracelet, grandma’s curls
  • “So this is Margaret, so this is Margaret.”
  • Two VCRs

 

Note:  My grandparents told me this and a few other stories about their interactions with President McKay several times.  I loved hearing them tell me stories.  This one has been on my mind because my oldest boy is currently waiting for a mission call.  The system says he has been assigned so we are just waiting for that big white envelope to arrive in the mail any day.  Don’t worry – he meets all of the criteria so he will not be kindly told to wait until he is older like my Grandma was.  😉


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Photograph Showcase: Missionary

Ronald Peterson, missionary photo

My Grandpa, the missionary

I have had an old scan of this photo for many years.  It wasn’t labeled, but I suspected it was a photo taken around the time of my Grandpa’s service as an LDS missionary.

While going though my Grandma’s boxes I found an original.  It lists his age on the back as 22 – right during his service as a missionary.  In this copy the photographer’s stamp is visible.  Notice under the photographer’s name it is stamped “Auckland”.  So I also now know that this photo was taken in New Zealand.

It’s a great photo I have loved for a long time, and now I know more about it.  Thank you Grandma for taking such good care of our family treasures!  Blowing a kiss toward heaven right now.

ps- Isn’t my Grandpa handsome?


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Help Preserve Records – 4 Pennies At a Time

Naomi Skeen, death record

“Utah Death Certificates, 1904-1964,” database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.3.1/TH-1971-31572-11166-64?cc=1747615 : accessed 4 March 2016), > image 1 of 1; citing series 81448; Utah State Archives Research Center, Salt Lake City, Utah.

That image is the death record for my great grandmother Naomi Skeen.  She’s the smart one who saved the divinity until her kiddos were craving a treat.

That image is available for free on FamilySearch.

Did you know that FamilySearch relies on LDS missionaries to volunteer their time and go to places all over the world to digitize records?  Those missionaries pay their own way but the equipment is provided by the church.  The church is allocating resources in an effort to preserve as many records as they can, as quickly as then can.

But, things happen.  Like natural disasters.  Sometimes records are destroyed before they are digitized.  The good news is that we can help!

LDS Philanthropies has various charities set up that meet different purposes.  Among those is the opportunity to donate directly to FamilySearch.  Ten cents saves three records – so my title is actually a little high.  That’s 30 records saved for every dollar donated.

One camera kit costs about $7,000.  Each new camera kit allows another set of missionaries to digitize away.  The LDS church has no trouble finding volunteers to serve missions.  So… more cameras, more missionaries, more records being saved.

Interested in donating a buck or two?  Click on over or call (801)356-5300 and reference Family Search acct #30-020-070.

Interested in a few more details?

Here is a list created by some of the folks at LDS Philanthropies:

  • The Church is literally racing against time as it tries to help gather and preserve the world’s genealogical records.
  • Historical records showing proof of life are disappearing at an alarming rate.
  • Records of our ancestors are subject to storage issues, decay, and natural disasters.
  • Last year’s typhoon in the Philippines destroyed millions of records in the Catholic
    diocese record archive.
  • Census records in India are destroyed every ten years.
  • The mass move to digital record keeping has nations throwing out handwritten records faster than ever.
  • Only 12 percent of the world’s top genealogical records are digitized and preserved,
    leaving the rest at risk of destruction or loss.
  • At current rates it will take 124 years to capture the top-tier records.
  • Governments are asking FamilySearch for help in preserving their records at three times the rate FamilySearch and its crews can capture.
  • Donations to FamilySearch go directly to the Church’s records-capture project.
  • 10 cents saves three records. That’s 30 records for every dollar donated. And that’s up to 30 people found. Imagine the impact of a $10,000 donation—that’s 300,000 people (the population of Cincinnati, Ohio) who will be forever grateful for your generosity.
  • FamilySearch is also helping loved ones find each other while they’re still alive. See how Mandy Phillips used the Church’s indexing program to reunite with grandparents she had not seen in 20 years. Click here to see her inspiring story.