thegenealogygirl


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Photograph Showcase: Seth & Emma’s Wedding Portrait

Emma & Seth wedding photo, 1902

Emma Esther Jerrain & Seth Maffit

Emma & Seth are my 2nd great-grandparents.  I’ve written about them a few times this year.  I shared the confusing details about the name of their oldest son.  I shared the lovely portrait of Emma with her three oldest surviving children.  Lastly, I shared the sad tale of their son Orval and his tragic death in a train accident.

I have several photos of Seth & Emma.  Actual photos that I can hold in my hand and scan and share.  This photo of their wedding day is not among them.  I have a very old color copy that was given to my grandmother that I scanned at the highest resolution reasonable and this is as good as it gets.  Normally I share the best of what I have.  But in this case, this is all that I have of their wedding.  So I share it here because this is certainly better than no photo.  But I also share it in the hopes that one day, the descendant who has the original may happen across this post and then choose to scan and share the original as a higher quality image.

Cousins!  Let’s get together and preserve and share this photo and any others that exist of Seth and Emma.  ❤

Now about that date handwritten on the bottom.  Seth and Emma were married 20 January 1901 in Chicago.  That fact is not in question.  I think this photo was just likely mislabeled at some point.  I can’t imagine they took it a full year after they were wed.  Although, stranger things have happened.  😉

 

 

Happy Thursday!  I hope you make a fantastic photo discovery very soon.  If not, if you happen to have a special original photo, please scan and share with your cousins.  xoxo

 


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I ran into a weird FamilySearch glitch…

Screen Shot 2018-04-26 at 8.16.12 PM

At the end of April, I shared the story of meeting a cousin and then getting together the next day with him and my uncle.  That afternoon, as we were visiting, we pulled up our tree on the FS app several times.  At one point, my uncle pulled up our ancestor, William Taylor.  He turned his phone to show me the page on William Taylor and I blurted out, “That’s not William Taylor, that’s James Lake.”  (James is also our ancestor.)  We got back on topic, but I was definitely puzzled about the photo issue and revisited it later.

I logged into FamilySearch on my laptop and looked at William Taylor.  Sure enough, his profile picture was a picture of James Lake.  An edited version of this photo of James Lake:

LAKE, James

But the really weird part was that the photo showing as William Taylor’s profile picture was NOWHERE in his memories.  I must have looked through that list of photos ten times trying to find the James Lake photo.  It simply wasn’t there.

So how on earth did a photo of James Lake become the profile picture for William Taylor?

I clicked on the profile picture and chose a different picture from William’s memories to become the profile picture for William Taylor.  Once I had done that, James Lake was no longer seen anywhere on William’s page.

This funny little moment has me wondering about a few things.

First, how did the wrong picture end up in his profile in the first place?  Was it uploaded to William Taylor and then later deleted?  If so, why did it still show as his profile picture?  Was it the first picture uploaded to William Taylor?  Does that make it the profile picture by default?

Second, how does a picture get assigned as the default profile picture?  I did not choose a photo as the profile photo for William Taylor.  So how does FS go about deciding for me?

Third, if this little glitch was a ghost of a photo that was uploaded and then deleted, why did it still show up as William’s profile picture?  That seems like a problem to me.

Here’s the good news in all of this.

IF I am correct and someone erroneously uploaded James Lake’s picture to William Taylor, crowdsourcing is working well on FamilySearch because now, William Taylor has a whole list of photos that are clearly all photos of the same man – hopefully of William –  and not of James Lake.  That is a good thing.

I’m grateful to all of the FamilySearch users who are trying to make the tree more accurate.  Thank you for your diligence!

And for those of you who get frustrated by the mistakes on FamilySearch, I am hopeful that this is an example of how the tree overall is evolving to a more accurate collection of data, photos, and stories.  I hope that trend continues!

 

 

Happy Tuesday, I hope you have a glitch-free week of family history!  xoxo

 

 

 

ps – I also hope that FamilySearch can make some adjustments to their system that will help beginners participate in a way that is less frustrating for more seasoned users.  We all go a little crazy when our pet relative is suddenly a disaster created by a beginner who doesn’t really know better.

 


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Cousins All Around

Last week I had a very unexpected experience.  I met a cousin that I had never heard of before.  We were in the same place, I heard his last name, then where he was from and had to interrupt to ask if he was related to my GrandAunt Beth‘s husband, Uncle Darwin.  After all, they share the same last name, a last name I’ve only ever heard in my own family, and they are from the same city about 2 hours North of me.

He responded with, “Yes, I am related to Darwin and Beth.”  At first, I was thinking that he was acknowledging his relationship to Beth through marriage.  I was wrong.  As we talked it became clear that he is actually more closely related to Aunt Beth – and to me! – than to Uncle Darwin.  This man and I share the common ancestors of Frederick William Ellis & Susan Kaziah Davis, pictured above.  We are second cousins once removed!

As we talked, I mentioned that I have a few family treasures from Frederick & Susan and invited him to stop by my home the next day to have a look.  He was staying with his daughter who lives in the next town, just minutes from my home.

The very next day, my newly discovered cousin came to my home, so did my Uncle.  We looked at some family treasures, talked about our shared family members, and were in awe of some of the artifacts that have survived all these years.  He especially enjoyed going through the Family Record book kept by Frederick.  He lovingly stroked the pages as he saw the names of his mother, grandparents, and then his own name, and the names of some of his siblings handwritten by his great-grandfather.  It was a beautiful moment.  We had a mini-Ellis family reunion right in my piano room.  It was a wonderful two hours of sharing.

My cousin is in his upper 80s, yet he is a second cousin to my father who is in his mid-60s.  Despite the geographic distance, the age difference, and never having met before – nor even hearing of each other before, we discovered our connection at a very unexpected moment.

And now I can’t help but wonder, how many cousin connections are all around me as I go about my daily life?  How many cousins have I spoken with and not known they were my cousin?  How many treasures do I hold that would mean so much to my unknown loved ones if only I realized who they were, how we connect and invited them to stop by and spend a little time enjoying the treasures of our shared ancestors?

This wonderful cousin is the first one to ever take me up on an offer to stop by to see some family heirlooms.  I hope he won’t be the last.

And now, I fear, I will become that person who obsessively tries to analyze everyone’s tree in my head while I talk to them.  But that’s not a bad thing, right?  😉

Our visit has prompted me to review some treasures that I can’t wait any longer to share.  My next several posts will focus on this part of my tree.  I’ve already begun scanning.  Are you excited?!  I am.  ❤

 

ps – This means the several posts I have been working on for weeks are being pushed back again.  Do you ever find yourself experiencing genealogy ADHD?  That’s what I feel like this week.  So much to share – so little time!  Can’t focus or finish because of the wonderful interruptions.  And I suddenly feel even more sorry for my child with ADHD.  I feel it with genealogy, he feels it all the time.

 


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Photograph Showcase: Rosey, For Sure

IMG_1531

Rosey Hyde, 1883-1970, photograph courtesy of Rosey’s great-granddaughter Cathy.

Nearly one year ago, I messaged a DNA match on Ancestry.com.  She appeared to be a descendant of Rosey Hyde, my 2nd great-grandaunt.  Rosey has always been of particular interest to me because of the circumstances of her birth, life, relationship with her sister (my 2nd great-grandmother Alice Hyde), marriages, and death.

Finding a living descendant of Rosey completely disproved what my Grandma told me about Rosey – that she was a gay barber who had no children.  In fairness to Grandma, she was completely cut off from this side of her family when she was very young.  She had a few memories of Rosey, but they were from her first 9 years of life, with no further contact after that time.

Not only was Rosey not childless, and apparently not gay, but she had two daughters and raised a third who was likely a grandchild.  She did cut hair, so at least that part was correct.  😉

Well, that DNA match responded to my message.  We have corresponded over the last year sharing photos, stories, and details.

A few weeks ago, she emailed me and asked if I would like a photo of Rosey for my archive.  !!!

OF COURSE, I WOULD!

 

As a very important aside – cousins, I ALWAYS want any photo, story, document, record image, or tidbit you are willing to share.  My email address is on the sidebar over there.  👉🏻  Bring it on, cousins!

 

I responded that I would very much like to have an image of Rosey for my archive.  She was headed off on an adventure and said she would send it to me when she got back.

She did just that.

When I opened that email and looked at a photo of Rosey, knowing that is was FOR SURE Rosey, well, be still my heart, suddenly this woman I have spent so much time researching and trying to understand has a face.  A beautiful face that looks so much like her sister’s face.

Thank you, dear cousin, for sharing this treasure, and for giving me permission to share it here.  I am so grateful.

And now readers, what do you think?  Is this photo I suspect to be Rosey in 1914 the same woman as the Rosey that I know for sure is Rosey?

 

Duval - mystery marriage

Possibly Rosey Hyde & Harry Grant Kingham, from the collection of Annie Marie Elvera Duval, niece of Rosey Hyde.

 

 

Happy Thursday, I wish you many wonderful cousin connections that lead to the joyful sharing of photos!  xoxo

 

 


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Photograph Showcase: Introducing John Baptiste Jerrain

John Baptiste Jerrain and Willow Jeane

John Baptiste Jerrain & Willow Jeane

Many years ago, my Grandma’s Maffit cousins decided to put together a book about their family.  It was quite an extensive effort.  Emails and phone calls went back and forth across the US as cousins tried to identify family members in old photo albums, recall family stories, and put the best information together that they could.  Somehow, I didn’t end up with a copy of that book.

Weird, right?

Well, ever since I found out about it – too late to get a copy – I have been trying to get my hands on the CD of photos that was created at the time the book was finished.  It has not been a fruitful effort.

But then.

Several weeks ago, I was at my parent’s home to help my mom for a few days.  She mentioned that the plastic tub sitting on the guest bed was some family history “stuff” from Grandma’s house that I may want to look through.  It sat for a few days before I got to it.  There were plenty of interesting items.  Partway through the collection, I came across a CD that was marked “SAVE” in big black sharpie.

At this point, I must interrupt myself to share with you, dear reader, that my Grandma was notorious for throwing away family treasures.  I will not subject you to the pains of rattling off a list of the items I know she tossed, or my speculation on what else may have been cast aside.  Except I can’t help myself.  Here is one small example – she had about 13 large tintypes that were not labeled.  She showed them to me and said she would be scanning them.  Somehow they ended up in the trash and if she ever scanned them, I don’t know where the scans ended up.  Her reasoning?  They weren’t labeled anyway.  Sigh.

So there I was, sitting on the guest bed, looking at a CD that Grandma had loudly labeled “SAVE” and hoping it was the CD of precious images from the Maffit family book.  I hopefully and joyfully added it to my already bursting suitcase.

Later that day, I mentioned to my Mom that I thought I had found a CD I had been hoping to get my hands on for years.  She tried to tell me I couldn’t take it.  Oh boy!  She hadn’t even looked in the tub, but when she thought there was something good, she wanted to hang onto it.  I just told her nope, I was taking it.  And I would share.  She couldn’t really argue.  Haha.

Finally last week I had a minute to download the photos from the CD.  It absolutely was what I thought it was!  Hooray!!

 

And so, I would like to introduce you to my 3rd great-grandfather, John Baptiste Jerrain.  Doesn’t he look dapper in his bowtie?

 

{Insert major genealogy happy dance here!!  🎉🎉🎉🎉🎉}

 

The photo is labeled with two names, John Baptiste Jerrain & Willow Jeane.  EDIT:  The following parenthetical paragraph is what I originally wrote.  Having looked more closely, the Willow Jeane who shared this photo is actually Willow Jeane Van Tuyl Lippert.  She is the daughter of Lila Estelle Jerrain & Thomas Oliver Van Tuyl.  She was born in 1928 (not 1929 as I noted before).  I am now uncertain of which Willow Jeane is in this picture.  When I get my hands on the book, I am hopeful I can sort this out properly.  In the meantime, if you happen to know something helpful, please share!  (The person who shared the photo was my Grandma’s 1st cousin, Willow Jeane, great-granddaughter of Grandpa Jerrain.  That Willow Jeane was born 6 years after Grandpa Jerrain died.  However, he had another granddaughter named Willow Jeane who was born in 1904, 26 years before Grandpa Jerrain passed.  He also had another great-granddaughter named Willow Jeane who was born in 1929, 1 year before his death.  Based on the age of the child, I would imagine that IF this child is Willow Jeane, she is Willow Jeane Jerrain, born in 1904, daughter of Prudent Arthur Jerrain & Jessie Campbell Shirky.)

What a treasure.

There are so many wonderful photos on the CD.  I am delighted!

 

But there is one more thing.  I almost hate to mention it.  But here goes.

 

The photos were scanned using what was likely the best scanning technology at the time.  Quite a long time ago.  Most of the photos are very, very small digital files.  Like very, very, very small.  This is one of the largest ones, by at least triple.  So if you are one of my Maffit cousins who happens to have any of the old originals of the family photos, how about scanning them again?  Or mailing them to this cousin to promptly scan and mail back to you?  I promise to share my scans.  🙂

 

 

Happy Monday, I hope a long sought for family treasure makes its way to you very, very soon!    xoxo

 

 

ps – Monday is not my normal day for a Photograph Showcase post, I have several other posts that are in varying stages of completion that were intended for today.  But I was so distracted by the joys of seeing my 3rd great-grandfather that I just had to share – TODAY!

 

 


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Tuesday’s Tip: What to do when your FS change log presents you with a tangled mess.

FS change log mess

 

This video is most applicable to FamilySearch users who participate in the Family Tree.  But it also contains some gems that may help FamilySearch users who do not participate in the tree.  Here are the items covered in this video:

  • FamilySearch watch lists.
  • The change log in FamilySearch’s Family Tree.
  • Command/Control click – which I wrote about here.
  • Reviewing record attachments in FamilySearch’s Family Tree, detaching records, changing the focus person in the attachments screen and then attaching the record to the correct person.
  • Ancestry’s FamilySearch button.  Using it to link people in your Ancestry Tree to the same individual in FamilySearch.  Using it to add someone new to the Family Tree on FamilySearch.  Using it to compare the version of a person in your Ancestry Tree with the version of a person in the Family Tree on FamilySearch, and sending data between the two websites.
  • The FamilySearch internal messaging system.  Making a plan with another user.
  • FamilySearch record hints.

 

 

Remember to click the ‘HD’ button on the bottom right of the video.

 

I went on to spend some time updating both Annas.  If you are interested in viewing each woman in the Family Tree on FamilySearch, Anna Graf can be found here, and Anna Evelyn Shoffer can be found here.

 

Confusing changes and tangled messes are part of working in the Family Tree on FamilySearch.  Frankly, that is why many genealogists stay away.  If you choose to participate the Family Tree, I hope this was helpful for you.  If it was, please feel free pass it on to other Family Tree users.

 

Happy Tuesday, I hope you don’t come across any tangled messes on your genealogy adventures today!  😉

 

 


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The Mess That Just Keeps on Growing

Whiteley - Hyde

Once upon a time, I drew that colorful – {both literally and figuratively} – flowchart.  I wrote about the matrimonial messiness in this part of my tree.  I followed that up with a post about Arthur Hyde who seemed to have left a family in England and then married his widowed sister-in-law while still being married to his wife back home.  That was followed by a post about the incestuous relationship between uncle and niece – Robert & Rosey Hyde.  Then there was the follow-up post reminding readers that we need to always click to the next image because I found even more details about that crazy mess up there on page 50 of a record.

This fascinating series of discoveries was capped off by a post all about Rosey’s Girls.  I had learned so much since I drew that first flowchart that I had to update it.

marrying mess

The crazy, twisty, utterly shocking journey did not end there.

DNA connected me with two of Rosey’s living granddaughters.  My finding-living-people-stalking skills led me to a direct descendant of Rose Elvera Hyde.  And my cousin bait – namely this blog – brought a living descendant of Arthur Hyde to my digital door.

GUESS WHAT THAT ALL MEANS?!

 

That super colorful flowchart needs another update.  A major update.  So major in fact that I have to start from scratch.  I thought that last post about Rosey’s Girls was hard to write.  Ummm…these next ones are going to be even more complicated if you can believe that.

I just wanted to share a few tid-bit teasers and two BIG, FAT REMINDERS as a PSA to all my fellow genealogists.

 

Tid-bit Teaser #1

I wrote this about the men in Rosey’s life: “There are details that come from the nuances of the records that lead me to believe that Harry was the great love of her life, that Neil was a loving old age companion, and that Robert, well, Robert seems to be the villain.  I don’t know if that’s fair, but that is who he is becoming in my mind.”

Well.  I got that completely wrong.  It turns out Harry is definitely the villain.  So much so that Robert is starting to seem not so bad.  How’s that for a turn of events?

 

Tid-bit Teaser #2

A very long time ago I wrote about my Grandma’s adopted first cousin Sherry Hunter.  At the time I wrote about Sherry, I still didn’t know Rosey had any children.  But it turns out that Sherry is a descendant of Rosey, adopted by her biological 1st cousin once removed.  Sherry belongs to that crazy mess up there.  I did not see that coming.

 

Tid-bit Teaser #3

Muriel Grace Groome nee Hyde - cleaned up

This lovely photo made it’s way to me.  That is Rosey’s daughter Muriel Grace.  Isn’t she beautiful?

 

Now for the PSAs.

 

Big Fat Reminder/PSA #1

If you have not DNA tested – PLEASE DO IT!  I cannot believe the wealth of information that has come my way as a result of DNA testing and transferring my results to two additional companies.  Followed up by contacting my matches.  In fact, I’ve gotten so caught up in the deluge, that I have lots of matches I haven’t had time to contact yet.  What other goodies are waiting for me?

 

Big Fat Reminder/PSA #2

When you have a mystery, brick wall, dead end – write about it.  Leave plenty of cousin bait.  If you are a regular reader you have probably noticed that I mostly write about my questions and unsolved mysteries.  In fact, if you aren’t paying close attention you might think I never solve anything.  😉  I am putting out massive amounts of cousin bait.  And it works.  People email me after finding something I wrote about a family member we have in common and they fill in details that ONLY THEY can share.  Details that exist in photo albums or memories.  Details that answer some of my most unanswerable questions.  Like what the heck happened to Arthur Hyde and his first wife Mary?  Did he really just leave her and the children behind in England and marry Alice?  Why yes, yes he did.

Cousin bait is your friend.  Make sure you are leaving it out to attract the cousins you need to find.  Your beautifully researched, perfectly reasoned, tidy little genealogy stories will attract cousins too, but usually not the cousins who bring more toys to the party.  You solved those ones.  Go ahead and write them up, but don’t let your mysteries languish in a stack of notes.  Those glittery little bits attract the distant cousins who just might answer some of your burning questions.  You may not like the answers – after all, there is a reason you haven’t been able to solve it with traditional research – but they are usually very fascinating answers.

 

Are you excited for my new flowchart?

 

I am!  Now, I just have to figure out how to fit all of the crazy connections on one page.

 

Maybe I need to go buy a posterboard…