thegenealogygirl


19 Comments

Save the Date!

2018FairPoster

I work one shift each week at my local Family History Center.  Every year, that center puts together a fantastic – and FREE – Family History Fair during the winter months.  We always draw a large crowd of people from our small town and the surrounding cities.  In fact, the last few years, we have filled the church almost to capacity.  This year I am teaching four classes.  It will be a busy day!

I know that most of my readers live far away from me and can’t possibly attend, but some of you live close by, so please, feel free to join us.  All are welcome.  The entire day is free and lunch is served.  It’s usually pizza, fresh veggies, cookies, and water.  Nothing too fancy, but it means you can stay all day without starving.  😉

2018Flyer

The classes I am teaching are the following:

DNA Basics – Have you wondered about using DNA in your research?  Come and learn about the different types of DNA tests, the different companies you can test with, what genealogy problems can be addressed with DNA, and a few examples of what DNA can do to knock down those brick walls.

Finding Hidden Records on FamilySearch – Did you know that FamilySearch has several different types of record collections? Come and learn how to find them all as we explore indexed collections with images, indexed collections with no images attached (but they might still be on FamilySearch), partially indexed collections with additional browse images, browse only collections, digitized microfilm found in the catalog that can be accessed from home, and digitized microfilm that can only be viewed at a Family History Center.

Making the Most of Ancestry.com – Come and learn how to supercharge your research on Ancestry.com by understanding the website and collections better and learning some fantastic smart search strategies that will help you find the records you are looking for more quickly.

Making the Most of Ancestry.com Trees – Why have a tree on Ancestry.com?  Is public or private better?  Learn how to create and use Ancestry.com Trees from scratch, by uploading a gedcom file, or by importing from FamilySearch.  Give your research a boost by adding the power of an Ancestry Tree.

I have been teaching the two Ancestry classes for a few years now, but they are a hit and draw a large crowd so I will just keep on teaching them as long as I am asked to do so.  😉  The DNA Basics class and the Finding Hidden Records on FamilySearch class are both new classes that I created this fall.  I LOVED teaching them and look forward to teaching them again.

Please feel free to join us and invite your friends!

 

Happy Tuesday, I hope you make a fantastic genealogy discovery today!

 

 

 

ps – We have had an unseasonably warm fall.  I think it was 60 degrees on Saturday.  FINALLY, it snowed on Sunday night.  My little fella has had his snow gear all gathered and ready for weeks now.  Well, not really his gear, a collection of items from the coat closet that he decided were the coolest.  😉  He was sooooo delighted to put it all on for school today.

 

pps – Su, in September I mentioned that we had snow on the mountains and everything was still in full bloom.  Here you go – three pictures taken on the same day, at about the same time, from about the same spot.  The mountain as seen from the front of my neighborhood, the flowers on my porch.  Utah weather is crazy!

 


6 Comments

Tuesday’s Tip: What to do when your FS change log presents you with a tangled mess.

FS change log mess

 

This video is most applicable to FamilySearch users who participate in the Family Tree.  But it also contains some gems that may help FamilySearch users who do not participate in the tree.  Here are the items covered in this video:

  • FamilySearch watch lists.
  • The change log in FamilySearch’s Family Tree.
  • Command/Control click – which I wrote about here.
  • Reviewing record attachments in FamilySearch’s Family Tree, detaching records, changing the focus person in the attachments screen and then attaching the record to the correct person.
  • Ancestry’s FamilySearch button.  Using it to link people in your Ancestry Tree to the same individual in FamilySearch.  Using it to add someone new to the Family Tree on FamilySearch.  Using it to compare the version of a person in your Ancestry Tree with the version of a person in the Family Tree on FamilySearch, and sending data between the two websites.
  • The FamilySearch internal messaging system.  Making a plan with another user.
  • FamilySearch record hints.

 

 

Remember to click the ‘HD’ button on the bottom right of the video.

 

I went on to spend some time updating both Annas.  If you are interested in viewing each woman in the Family Tree on FamilySearch, Anna Graf can be found here, and Anna Evelyn Shoffer can be found here.

 

Confusing changes and tangled messes are part of working in the Family Tree on FamilySearch.  Frankly, that is why many genealogists stay away.  If you choose to participate the Family Tree, I hope this was helpful for you.  If it was, please feel free pass it on to other Family Tree users.

 

Happy Tuesday, I hope you don’t come across any tangled messes on your genealogy adventures today!  😉

 

 


7 Comments

Tuesday’s Tip: Cleaning up Facts & Sources in an Ancestry Tree

Cleaning up Facts and Sources in an Ancestry Tree

 

Today’s tip is for anyone who uses an Ancestry tree.  When we attach sources, we generally add facts to a person’s timeline.  Sometimes we get some duplicate facts that are really about the same event.  It happens.  We can avoid that, but even if you know how to avoid it, we are human and sometimes forget.

In this quick video, I will show you a person in my Ancestry tree who had three different facts about one marriage event.  I will show you how to carefully review the sources linked to each fact, delete unnecessary facts, edit the remaining fact to reflect the event accurately, and then link all supporting sources to that one fact on the timeline.

This process is pretty fast, but it’s important because it helps tidy up a person’s timeline.  Tidy trees are easier to review.

 

 

 

Do you know how to avoid these multiple fact entries on a person’s timeline?  I’m contemplating a follow-up video on that subject…

 

 

Happy Tuesday, I hope you make a fantastic genealogy discovery today!

 

 

ps – Did you index a batch?  I just checked the stats (I’m writing this on Monday the 23rd at 11:30ish).  It says that 4,868,080 records have been indexed and there were 60,408 volunteers participating.  I hope those numbers aren’t final yet because that is less than half of last year’s event.  But let’s focus on the positive.  That is nearly 5 million more records that will be searchable for free on FamilySearch!  If you did not participate – NO GUILT!  But, even indexing 1 batch a month is an important contribution.  Consider setting a goal for yourself that is appropriate for your time.  If all genealogists gave back by indexing one batch a month just imagine what we could accomplish together!  Except you don’t have to imagine.  I’ll do that math for you.  In 2016, there were 3.45 million contributors to FamilySearch.  Multiply that by 12 – one batch per month – and you get 41.4 million records.  Pretty awesome!


25 Comments

Tuesday’s Tip: Command Click

Command Click

I LOVE keyboard shortcuts!

They save time and page loads, which of course is also time.  I love saving page loads.  I’m a busy mom, I will do anything I can to save page loads.

So today, I would like to introduce you to one of the lesser known keyboard shortcuts, ‘Command Click’ for a mac OR ‘Control Click’ for a pc.

In the video I will show you how to use this tip on:

  • Ancestry.com – open items in new windows without losing the page you started from.
  • Ancestry.com – open ‘Suggested Records’ in their own windows so you can click back and forth between them to compare the data.  (Did you already know about the ‘Suggested Records’ on the sidebar in Ancestry.com?  If not, another bonus tip for you!)
  • FamilySearch.com – open people in a new window without losing the tree view you started from.
  • FamilySearch.com – open other family members in their own window without losing the family member you started from.
  • Blog posts – when a blog post has links that don’t open in their own window – learn how to open them in their own window so you don’t lose the blog post you started from.
  • Amazon.com – if you’ve loaded up your cart with several items you want to choose between, from the cart, open each item in their own window so you can easily click between windows without waiting for page loads.
  • ANY website with hyperlinks – learn how to open those links in their own window.

 

Seriously guys, if you use the internet for anything at all, you ALL want to watch this one.

 

 

Make sure you click and HOLD the command or control button while you click your mouse.

 

Do you have a favorite keyboard shortcut that most people don’t know about?  If so, tell us about it!

 

 

ps – This is my 400th post!  🎉 🎉 🎉 🎉

 

 

 


16 Comments

Happy Birthday America

This is my favorite commercial ever created in the genealogy industry.  I love the concept and the execution.  In less than a minute, Ancestry.com managed to remind us of the importance of unity and freedom.

This great experiment that is America, survives and thrives by our willingness to be united in supporting the freedom and rights of every human being.  I hope our experiment continues for generations to come.  I hope this lovely commercial can serve as a reminder that there is always more that unites us than divides us.  We are stronger when we are one.

Happy Birthday America.

 

Thank you Ancestry.com for reminding us what we celebrate on this day.

 


20 Comments

My DNA Results – How do they compare to my tree? (Updated)

Screen Shot 2017-05-06 at 5.52.56 PM

Yesterday I shared my ethnicity percentages based on my tree.  They look a little something like this:

  • 62.5% – British Isles (English, Mixed British Isles, Scottish, Welsh)
  • 15.6% – Europe West (French Canadian, French)
  • 9.4% – Scandinavian
  • 6.3% – Some mixture of European Jewish & Italy, Greece
  • 6.3% – Iberian Peninsula (Spanish)

As you can see from my screenshot up there, I have some interesting differences between my tree and the DNA I inherited.  Here is a comparison of my tree ethnicities and my DNA ethnicities.

Ethnicity comparison - Sheet1

The first important note is that those trace ethnicities, 2% or lower, are often considered noise.  In my case, those bottom three surprise ethnicities are not backed up by documentation.  The first six however, are documented, even the 1% Iberian Peninsula.

The biggest surprises for me are these:

  • How little of the French and French Canadian DNA I inherited.
  • How much European Jewish DNA I inherited.
  • How much Italy, Greece DNA I inherited.

John Costello and his ancestors make up 12.5% of my tree.  And yet, I inherited 19% of the three regions he could have contributed – Iberian Peninsula, European Jewish, and Italy, Greece.

And here is where I need to beef up my learning, you see something I read recently caused me to misunderstand a very important point – you inherit 50% of your DNA from each parent, beyond that, it is a random mixture of all that came before them.  I had a handful of paragraphs with some interesting questions and insights into some of the nuances of my tree.  But those questions and insights were based on my misunderstanding, so I chopped them out.  😉  Thank you Deborah for some helpful pointers!  (See her comment below).

I have so much to learn about genetic genealogy.  I need to test my siblings and cousins so I can isolate the various pieces of my DNA and do some fancy-science-y-ultra-nerdy-but-oh-so-cool-DNA-genealogy like this.

While I am still learning, and not completely sure of what my next steps are, the thing I keep coming back to is… How can I be 10% European Jewish when I had no idea I had ANY European Jewish ancestry?  10%.  That’s a lot of percent.  Especially when I didn’t see it coming.

This DNA stuff is oh-so-fascinating.  Have you tested?  Did you find any surprises?

Happy Wednesday, I hope you make a fantastic genealogy discovery today – DNA or otherwise!


3 Comments

RootsTech Videos & A Question

rootstech

If you missed RootsTech, you can still soak up some RootsTech goodness!  Below are links to the recorded sessions available on the RootsTech website.  I’m so sad to say that the LeVar Burton session isn’t included.  It was excellent.  Here is a brief recap article.

I am also delighted to say that they still have the 2016 RootsTech videos available.  They don’t normally do that so I’m not sure how long they will be there.  There are several that are worth watching.

And now for my question…

I purchased a few DNA kits while at RootsTech, a few from ancestry and a few from FamilyTreeDNA.  For those of you who have purchased an ancestry DNA kit for a family member, did you activate the kit before you gave it to them?  Is that the only way I am the steward of the account?  That seems logical to me but I’m hoping for a little input from those of you with experience.

 

Happy Wednesday, I hope you make a delightful genealogy discovery today!