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Dear Emma, What should I call your oldest son? Love, Amberly

 

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A family record typed by Hope Estelle Maffit Duval.  Older data came from her mother Emma Esther Jerrain Maffit.  There are multiple copies of this record that all list Chesterfield Jerrain Maffit with these dates.

 

Dear Grandma Emma,

Thank you for leaving family records that your daughter Estelle, my great-grandmother, typed up.  They are so helpful!

But here’s the deal – your second child and first son?  You gave him two, sort of three, different names.  I don’t know what I should call him.

In all of the family records Estelle typed up, she listed him as Chesterfield Jerrain Maffit.  But there are no birth or death records for a Chesterfield Jerrain Maffit.  There is a birth record for an Orin Maffit and a death record for an Orrin Seth Maffit.  But guess what?  The dates on those records don’t match the dates you list for Chesterfield.  Not exactly.

Your daughter typed up a birthdate of 5 January 1905, and a death date of 21 March 1905, for Chesterfield.  (For a while, I was extra confused because a family member had mistyped from Estelle’s record and gave a death date for Chesterfield of 20 January 1905.)1  Orin’s birth date was 5 January 19062 and his death date was 23 March 19063.  Those dates are so similar that I really struggled with whether or not Chesterfield and Orrin were the same child.  I actually have both children in my tree because I did not want to leave out any of your precious children – and what if you really had two sons born on the same day a year apart who died one year and two days apart?

But just a few weeks ago, I found my first record for Chesterfield.  I was soooo excited!  The record is Chesterfield’s baptism record4.  It reads this way:

“350   Name: Chesterfield Seth Maffit    Parents: Seth and Emma    When Born: January 1st ” [ditto marks for 1906]    When Baptised: ” [ditto marks for Mch] 23rd ” [ditto marks for 190-, the last digit in the year is cut off, the index indicates 1906]”

This is the first record that ties the two boys together.  It brings the dates for Orrin with the name of Chesterfield, just with the middle name of Seth instead of Jerrain.  I think Orrin and Chesterfield are the same boy.  Am I right?

In the 1910 census5, you are listed as the mother of four with two living.  If you really had both Orrin and Chesterfield, those numbers should be five with two living.  You wouldn’t forget a baby that you buried, would you?

So, did you name your first son Orin, baptize him as Chesterfield Seth, then list his name as Orrin Seth on his death record, and then decide to call him Chesterfield Jerrain in your family record?  Or is there something else going on?  Did you name him Orin, decide to go with Chesterfield and then after he died, your brother-in-law William, who was a doctor and the informant for your son’s death (and birth), listed his name as Orrin Seth on the death record without consulting you?

The baptism record also brings up other questions for me.  The baptism record for Chesterfield lists his date of baptism as 23 March 1906.  He was the only child baptized that day, a Friday.  That is the very day that Orrin Seth died of acute fermental diarrhea.  Did you know that he was going to die?  Was this an emergency baptism?  What must that day have been like for you?  A cloth diaper disaster, the impending death of your second child, your second child to die… how did you get through that day?

Grandma Emma, I want to represent your story, and family, accurately.  I think I can merge Orrin Seth and Chesterfield Jerrain.  But am I right?

With Much Love,

Amberly, your 2nd great-granddaughter

 

 

Dear Readers,

Please feel free to share your thoughts on this one.  Merging those two boys will be mighty difficult for me.  I would hate to erase someone’s existence from my tree.  But on the other hand… it seems like they are the same person.  What do you think?

Love,

Amberly, the girl over here trying to sort everything out correctly

 

 

Happy Monday, wouldn’t it be wonderful if we could figure out a way to send letters to the past through some special time-traveling-bank-style-pneumatic-tube?  And then get answers to our questions from that same magical tube?  I would sooooo get in line to do that!  😉

 

 

 

 


  1. Chesterfield Jerrain Maffit has an entry in the Family Tree on FamilySearch.  It shows my username as having submitted the data but my I am fairly certain that my sister did that.  I may have been the one to link him to his parents early on and that may be why my username shows there.  You can view him here:  https://www.familysearch.org/tree/person/details/MV9B-FTM 
  2. “Illinois, Cook County Birth Certificates, 1878-1922,” index, FamilySearch.org (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/NQRD-DLP : accessed 07 May 2014), Orin Maffit, 05 Jan 1906; citing Chicago, Cook, Illinois, reference 10380, Cook County Courthouse, Chicago; FHL microfilm 1,288,111 (film accessed 06 May 2014 at BYU). 
  3. “Illinois, Cook County Deaths, 1878-1922,” index, FamilySearch.org (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/N7WT-332 : accessed 07 May 2014), Orrin Seth Maffit, 23 Mar 1906; citing 2896 Archer Ave, Chicago, Cook, Illinois, Cemetery, cn, Cook County Courthouse, Chicago; FHL microfilm 1,239,737 (film accessed 06 May 2014 at BYU). 
  4. Presbyterian Historical Society; Philadelphia, Pennsylvania; “U.S., Presbyterian Church Records, 1701-1907″; Book Title: Session/Register 1887-1923; Accession Number: Vault BX 9211 .I30608 I42, image for Chesterfield Seth Maffit, baptism 23 March 1906, image 170 of 228, line 350; accessed through “U.S., Presbyterian Church Records, 1701-1970,” database and images, Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 25 January 2016). 
  5. 1910 U.S. census, Cook County, Illinois, Chicago Ward 5, population schedule, enumeration district (ED) 286, page 3B (handwritten), dwelling 39, family 54, lines 93-96, Seth Moffit household, digital image, Ancestry.com, (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 11 May 2018); citing FHL microfilm 1,374,257, original source data NARA microfilm publication T624, roll 244. 


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52 Ancestors – The Duval Triplets – Three Babies with Four Names

DUVAL, twins

Two of the Duval Triplets born to Leon Howard Duval & Annabel Freda Yock, 10 August 1932

 

The Birth & Death Story

 

Wednesday, the 10th of August 1932, triplets were born to Leon Howard Duval and Annabel Freda Yock in the new Columbus Hospital in Great Falls, Montana.1  This hospital opened in 19302 and the Duval babies were the first triplets3 to be born in that hospital.  All three babies were boys and were the third, fourth, and fifth sons born to Leon and Annabel.

Prior to the birth of the triplets, Leon and Annabel were living in Playwood, Washington where Leon was a harbor employee4.  Annabel traveled to Great Falls to stay with her mother-in-law, Alice Duval (my 2nd great-grandmother) at 708 3rd Avenue SW for the express purpose of giving birth to her children in Great Falls.5  She had arrived shortly before the children were born.

On that Wednesday morning, the first baby was born at 11:37 am and weighed 2 lbs. 10 1/2 oz.6  Baby number two was born at 12:07 pm and weighed 3 lbs. 1 1/2 oz.7  The last baby was born at 12:10 pm and weighed in at 3 lbs. 6 1/2 oz.8  A newspaper report claims that all three boys had blue eyes and that two of them had dark hair while the other was fair.9

It is interesting – and overwhelming – to note that Leon and Annabel’s other sons were just three and two years old at the time the triplets were born.10  This may explain why Annabel would travel such a great distance to give birth.  Her mother-in-law was not the only Duval family member living in Great Falls at the time.  All of Leon’s living siblings and their spouses were living in Great Falls in both 1931 and 1932 – Vera and Bill Hunter,11 12 Frank and Estelle – my great-grandparents,13 14 Dolores and Fred Cleveland,15 16 and Valmore who was 15 and 16 in 1931 and 1932.

Just two hours and twenty minutes after the final triplet was born, one of them passed away at 2:30 pm on Wednesday, 10 August 1932.17

On Thursday, 11 August 1932, another triplet died.  The final living triplet was reported to be doing well.18

Saturday, 13 August 1932, private funeral services were held for two of the Duval triplets at O’Connor Chapel and then the babies were buried in Highland Cemetery.19

 

Family Records

 

The birth and death of the triplets were recorded by my great-grandmother in numerous hand-typed family records as seen here:

 

francis-duane-duval-book-page-four022

Excerpt from family record created by Estelle Duval.

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Excerpt from family record created by Estelle Duval.

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Excerpt from family record created by Estelle Duval.  note – The last of Leon and Annabel’s children passed away in September 2017.

IMG_0952

Excerpt from family record created by Estelle Duval.  note – The last of Leon and Annabel’s children passed away in September 2017.

 

Grandma Duval was inconsistent in her names for the triplets.  She used four names for three babies – James, Joseph, John, and Stanley John.

When I first began working with her records, there was not an online collection of Montana birth or death records I could use to verify and clarify her notes.  I was stuck with a bit of a mystery.

The two facts she consistently identified were that James died 10 August 1932, and that John died 11 August 1932.  I felt confident about adding dates, but I struggled to identify the correct names for each baby.  I wondered if Leon and Annabel would name one boy John and another Stanley John.  I was leaning toward James and Joseph being the correct names for the two triplets who did not live.

 

Records to the Rescue

 

The Montana Birth Index, 1870-1986 includes three Duval babies born in 1932 in Great Falls.  Two were listed simply as ‘Duval’ without first names, born 10 August 1932.20 21  And the third baby is actually my grandmother, Deane Alice Duval, born 27 June 1932.22

One triplet is missing from the birth index.

The Montana Death Index, 1907-2015 includes two Duval deaths in Cascade County in 1932.  John Duval who died 10 August 1932,23 and Joseph Duval who died 11 August 1932.24

So how does that compare to Grandma Duval’s notes?  She listed:

  • Stanley John Duval, born 10 August 1932 – correct – verified with other records not mentioned in this post.
  • James Duval, born 10 August 1932, died 10 August 1932 – there is no triplet named James, but these dates are correct for the triplet named John.
  • John Duval, born 10 August 1932, died 11 August 1932one of the triplets was named John Duval, but these are the dates for Joseph Duval.
  • Joseph Duval, born and died within 1 1/2 days of birth – correct

All in all, Grandma Duval didn’t do too bad.  She added an extra name in there and listed the wrong death date for John Duval.  But the important thing she did is create a record.  She gave me a starting place from which I could search for records to verify and clarify her record.  This is particularly important because the birth and death records in the indexes DO NOT list parent names.  I would not have stumbled upon them accidentally.  Her records pointed the way for me to correctly add John & Joseph to their family group.

I am still a bit surprised that Leon and Annabel named one triplet John and another Stanley John.  John is not a family name among the Duvals and it is not the name of Annabel’s father.  Because I do not have the birth record for Stanley John I suppose it is possible that his middle name was not given at birth but was added later.

Years ago, my own grandmother shared a story with me, one that I cannot possibly verify, about what led to the triplets’ early birth.  It is not a pleasant story.  I will simply state that based on that story and other tid-bits Grandma shared with me, it appears that Leon and Annabel had a rather tumultuous relationship.  That supposition seems to be backed up by the fact that Leon’s oldest son, who was 13 at the time of his father’s death, took the name of his step-father and went by Leon Revel for the remainder of his life.  Only his youngest sister did the same.

 

Details of an Unusual Photograph

 

Let’s have another look at that photograph from the beginning of this post, shall we?  I’ll make it a touch bigger.

DUVAL, twins

John & Joseph Duval, 13 August 1932, Highland Cemetery, Great Falls, Montana

 

This photograph has always fascinated me.  It’s terribly sad to see two small babies side by side in a casket but there is so much more in this picture.  Let’s break it down.

Two babies in one very small, open casket.  A large headstone when there are several visible graves with only placards.  The open hole that doesn’t look nearly deep enough with the shovel visible under the casket.  The old 2x4s supporting the casket.  The unkempt grounds. The car in the background that is so close to other graves.  The shadow of the head that is definitely a Duval head.  (Definitely may be too strong a word here, but I’m going with it anyway.  Heather, do you see it too?)  Is it Leon?  I think it looks more like my great-grandfather’s shadow.

I have two other photos in my collection of bodies in open caskets.  One is my granduncle Darrell Skeen Peterson, the other is my 2nd great-grandmother, Emma Esther Jerrain.  What makes this photo unique is that it is the only open casket photo in my collection that is at the gravesite.  Not just at the gravesite, but literally on top of the open grave.

 

Last Thoughts

 

My impression of Leon and Annabel colors my view of not only the birth, but also the deaths of John & Joseph.  I feel less sorrow than usual as I write about their early deaths.  I actually feel some relief for them.  That isn’t fair.  My usual tears for a mother who buried her babies did not flow as I typed.  I hope my impressions of Leon and Annabel are unjust and biased.  What I do know for certain is that John & Joseph’s lives were incredibly short, unfairly short.

Stanley went on to live a full life that unfortunately ended in his death in a house fire in 1991.  He was an army veteran who raised four daughters.  I have corresponded with one of those daughters.  I shared photographs with her.  She had never before seen a photo of her grandfather Leon.  She didn’t know anything about Leon.  He was her brick wall.  I helped her with that.  She is a lovely person and I am so glad to call her cousin.

Whatever prejudice I may hold for Leon & Annabel, in the end, they are part of my family.  I love my family.  All of them, warts and all.  I hope I have honored the memory of their triplets today.

 

 

 

Note – There are three interesting tid-bits I need to add.  1 – Annabel spells her name inconsistently as Annabel and Annabelle.  As in her own signature is seen spelled both ways.  2 – John Duval’s grave shows up in FindAGrave, but Joseph’s grave does not.  3 – The certificate numbers for the two ‘Duval’ birth records are G F 10413 and G F 10415.  I wonder if the missing record is G F 10414 and it somehow didn’t make it into the online index?

 

 

 


  1. “Triplets are Born in Falls Hospital,” (Helena, Montana) The Independent Record, 13 August 1932, p. 6, col. 2; digital images, Newspapers.com, (https://www.newspapers.com/clip/18015653/the_independent_record/?xid=637 : accessed 5 Mar 2018). 
  2. LaPorte, Margaret, Columbus Hospital : One Hundred Years, (Seattle, Washington: Providence Archives, 1992), photo p. between pp. 23-24; PDF download, www.providence.org (https://www.providence.org/-/media/files/providence/about/history/columbus-hospital-one-hundred-yearsweb.pdf?la=en : accessed 21 Mar 2018). 
  3. “Triplets Are Born to Mrs. L. H. Duval; One of Them Dies,” Great Falls Tribune, 11 August 1932, p. 9, col. 6; digital images, Newspapers.com, (https://www.newspapers.com/clip/18015792/great_falls_tribune/?xid=637 : accessed 5 Mar 2018). 
  4. “Triplets Are Born to Mrs. L. H. Duval; One of Them Dies,” Great Falls Tribune, 11 August 1932, p. 9, col. 6; digital images, Newspapers.com, (https://www.newspapers.com/clip/18015792/great_falls_tribune/?xid=637 : accessed 5 Mar 2018). 
  5. “Triplets are Born in Falls Hospital,” (Helena, Montana) The Independent Record, 13 August 1932, p. 6, col. 2; digital images, Newspapers.com, (https://www.newspapers.com/clip/18015653/the_independent_record/?xid=637 : accessed 5 Mar 2018). 
  6. “Triplets are Born in Falls Hospital,” (Helena, Montana) The Independent Record, 13 August 1932, p. 6, col. 2; digital images, Newspapers.com, (https://www.newspapers.com/clip/18015653/the_independent_record/?xid=637 : accessed 5 Mar 2018). 
  7. “Triplets are Born in Falls Hospital,” (Helena, Montana) The Independent Record, 13 August 1932, p. 6, col. 2; digital images, Newspapers.com, (https://www.newspapers.com/clip/18015653/the_independent_record/?xid=637 : accessed 5 Mar 2018). 
  8. “Triplets are Born in Falls Hospital,” (Helena, Montana) The Independent Record, 13 August 1932, p. 6, col. 2; digital images, Newspapers.com, (https://www.newspapers.com/clip/18015653/the_independent_record/?xid=637 : accessed 5 Mar 2018). 
  9. “Triplets are Born in Falls Hospital,” (Helena, Montana) The Independent Record, 13 August 1932, p. 6, col. 2; digital images, Newspapers.com, (https://www.newspapers.com/clip/18015653/the_independent_record/?xid=637 : accessed 5 Mar 2018). 
  10. “Triplets are Born in Falls Hospital,” (Helena, Montana) The Independent Record, 13 August 1932, p. 6, col. 2; digital images, Newspapers.com, (https://www.newspapers.com/clip/18015653/the_independent_record/?xid=637 : accessed 5 Mar 2018). 
  11. R. L. Polk, compiler, Great Falls, Montana, City Directory, (Great Falls; R. L. Polk Directory Co., 1931), p. 101, entry for Hunter, Wm A (Alvera); digitized in “U.S. City Directories, 1822-1995,” database, Ancestry (https://www.ancestry.com : accessed 5 March 2018), path Montana > Great Falls > 1931. 
  12. R. L. Polk, compiler, Great Falls, Montana, City Directory, (Great Falls; R. L. Polk Directory Co., 1932), p. 91, entry for Hunter, Wm A (Elvera M); digitized in “U.S. City Directories, 1822-1995,” database, Ancestry (https://www.ancestry.com : accessed 5 March 2018), path Montana > Great Falls > 1932. 
  13. R. L. Polk, compiler, Great Falls, Montana, City Directory, (Great Falls; R. L. Polk Directory Co., 1931), p. 67, entry for Duval, Frank H (Estelle H); digitized in “U.S. City Directories, 1822-1995,” database, Ancestry (https://www.ancestry.com : accessed 5 March 2018), path Montana > Great Falls > 1931. 
  14. R. L. Polk, compiler, Great Falls, Montana, City Directory, (Great Falls; R. L. Polk Directory Co., 1932), p. 60, entry for Duval, Frank H (Estelle H); digitized in “U.S. City Directories, 1822-1995,” database, Ancestry (https://www.ancestry.com : accessed 5 March 2018), path Montana > Great Falls > 1932. 
  15. R. L. Polk, compiler, Great Falls, Montana, City Directory, (Great Falls; R. L. Polk Directory Co., 1931), p. 54, entry for Cleveland, Deleres Mrs.; digitized in “U.S. City Directories, 1822-1995,” database, Ancestry (https://www.ancestry.com : accessed 5 March 2018), path Montana > Great Falls > 1931. 
  16. R. L. Polk, compiler, Great Falls, Montana, City Directory, (Great Falls; R. L. Polk Directory Co., 1932), p. 48, entry for Cleveland, Fred D (Dolores); digitized in “U.S. City Directories, 1822-1995,” database, Ancestry (https://www.ancestry.com : accessed 5 March 2018), path Montana > Great Falls > 1932. 
  17. “Triplets Are Born to Mrs. L. H. Duval; One of Them Dies,” Great Falls Tribune, 11 August 1932, p. 9, col. 6; digital images, Newspapers.com, (https://www.newspapers.com/clip/18015792/great_falls_tribune/?xid=637 : accessed 5 Mar 2018). 
  18. “Second of Triplets Dies at Hospital,” Great Falls Tribune, 12 August 1932, p. 2, col. 2; digital images, Newspapers.com, (https://www.newspapers.com/clip/18016405/great_falls_tribune/?xid=637 : accessed 5 Mar 2018). 
  19. “Private Funeral Services to Be Held for Duval Infants,” Great Falls Tribune, 13 August 1932, p. 7, col. 1; digital images, Newspapers.com, (https://www.newspapers.com/clip/18015465/great_falls_tribune/?xid=637 : accessed 5 Mar 2018). 
  20. “Montana, Birth Index, 1870-1986,” database, Ancestry (https://www.ancestry.com : accessed 5 March 2018), entry for Duval, 10 August 1932, Great Falls, Cascade, Montana, certificate no. G F 10413; citing “Montana, Birth Index, 1920-1986,” Montana Department of Public Health and Human Services, Helena, Montana. 
  21. “Montana, Birth Index, 1870-1986,” database, Ancestry (https://www.ancestry.com : accessed 5 March 2018), entry for Duval, 10 August 1932, Great Falls, Cascade, Montana, certificate no. G F 10415; citing “Montana, Birth Index, 1920-1986,” Montana Department of Public Health and Human Services, Helena, Montana. 
  22. “Montana, Birth Index, 1870-1986,” database, Ancestry (https://www.ancestry.com : accessed 5 March 2018), entry for Deane Alice Duval, 27 June 1932, Great Falls, Cascade, Montana, certificate no. G F 10325; citing “Montana, Birth Index, 1920-1986,” Montana Department of Public Health and Human Services, Helena, Montana. 
  23. “Montana, Death Index, 1907-2015,” database, Ancestry (https://www.ancestry.com : accessed 5 March 2018), entry for John Duval, 10 August 1932, Cascade, Montana; citing “Montana, Death Index, 1868-2015,” Montana Department of Public Health and Human Services, Helena, Montana. 
  24. “Montana, Death Index, 1907-2015,” database, Ancestry (https://www.ancestry.com : accessed 5 March 2018), entry for Joseph Duval, 10 August 1932, Cascade, Montana; citing “Montana, Death Index, 1868-2015,” Montana Department of Public Health and Human Services, Helena, Montana. 


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52 Ancestors – Finding Andrew Brown’s Parents

Thankerton-Gardens-00027

Thankerton, photo by Frieda Oxenham, used with permission. Originally posted here.

 

Short lives, lived by people with common names, before civil registration began, are difficult to trace.

Difficult, but not impossible.

My fourth great-grandfather, Andrew Brown, led one of those short lives, with a common name, before civil registration.  Learning his story seemed impossible when I first began researching my Scottish ancestors many years ago.  But it was not, in fact, impossible – just slow and difficult.

For many years, the only trace of Andrew came from the records of his wife and children.  Until I found him on a marriage record, the first record I found in which he appears for an event about his own life.  As years passed, additional bits and pieces were gathered.  Some were promising, others confusing, and plenty were missing.  Last year I found a handful of records that tied it all together.  But I was still missing two highly desired documents.  Just last week, I found one of those two records.  The remaining item, still missing, was for his child.  But the record that was found helped clear up some mystery surrounding that child.  So now it is time to tell the story of Andrew Brown from the beginning.

 

A Challenging Beginning

 

Andrew Brown entered this world in 1828 at a disadvantage.  He was born to unmarried parents at a time when illegitimacy was considered shameful.  His baptism record states:

 

Brown       James Brown in the parish of Liberton and Margaret Thomson in this Parish a natural son named Andrew born August 18th bapd Decemr 21st 1828″1

 

Natural son.  Not lawful son.  A slightly kinder way to say that Andrew was illegitimate.

My Scottish family members were poor.  They were usually laborers, servants, or miners.  There were many illegitimate births in the Scottish branches of my tree.  Those children, precious to me, but labeled and shamed, were often raised by grandparents.  The mothers did not always go on to marry.  The stigma had a lasting effect.

But for Andrew, his birth did not prevent him from being raised by his mother.  Nor did it prevent his mother from marrying.

Six years after Andrew’s birth, his mother Margaret married John Baillie on the 17th of October 1834 in Wiston and Roberton, Lanark, Scotland.2

While discovering that marriage cheered my heart, finding Margaret, John, their children AND Andrew living together in Wiston and Roberton on the 1841 Census3 filled my heart to bursting.  Not only did John Baillie marry a woman who would have been labeled as a fornicatrix, but he welcomed her young, illegitimate, son into their home.  In my family, that is unprecedented and has been matched only once more.  At least, in the records I have found so far…

 

Beginning His Family

 

On the 15th of June 1849, Andrew married Mary Robertson in Wanlockhead, Dumfries, Scotland.4    Andrew was living in the parish of Wiston, Mary in the parish of Sanquhar.  A record for banns can be found in each parish.5

Mary was older, but exactly how much older is difficult to determine.  In reviewing the records of her life, she has an approximate birth year that ranges from 1821-1827 making her somewhere between one and seven years Andrew’s senior.

Andrew and Mary’s first known child is William Brown, born in about 1849 in Muirkirk, Ayr, Scotland.6

In the Spring of 1851, Andrew is found living as a servant in the household of David M Lapraik in Muirkirk and working as an agricultural laborer.7  Mary and William are also in Muirkirk, living in the village.  Mary is listed as a handsewer.8  Both Andrew and Mary are listed as married despite being in separate households.

Andrew and Mary welcomed their second child, Alexander Robertson Brown, 27 September 1851 in Pettinain, Lanark, Scotland.9  I hope this move provided a job and living arrangements that kept the family under the same roof.

Exactly twenty-five months later, a third son, Andrew Brown, was born to Andrew and Mary on 27 October 1853 in Covington and Thankerton, Lanark, Scotland.10  On the baptism record for Andrew, son of Andrew, an address of Mainz is listed.  This becomes very important in the quest to find Andrew Brown’s death record.

At this point in 1853, Andrew and Mary have three known children – William, Alexander, and Andrew.  In FamilySearch, there is a fourth child listed for Andrew and Mary.  A daughter named Catherine, ID# KNHZ-Z8V, who is listed as being born in 1854 in Scotland.  I can find no trace of Catherine.  Is she really their daughter?  I don’t know.

 

Death & Leaving Mary to an Uncertain Future

 

Three-hundred-and-sixty-four days after the birth of Andrew, Andrew Brown dies on 26 October 1854 in Covington and Thankerton, Lanark, Scotland.11  That record holds little information and reads:

 

Octr 26        Andrew Brown, Mains        aged 25

 

With the overwhelming number of death records for an Andrew Brown born in 1828, the address of Mainz/Mains was a crucial detail to tie this death record to my Andrew Brown.

Twenty-five years is a short life.  Andrew spent his years as an agricultural laborer or ploughman.  For part of those years, he lived in the beautiful area of Covington and Thankerton as seen above.  I am glad to know he lived and worked in such a lovely place.

His death left Mary as the widowed mother of at least three young children.  She would go on to have a daughter named Christina Greenshields Robertson, twenty-eight-and-one-half months after the death of Andrew.12  Like Andrew, Christina was illegitimate.  For many years, other genealogists listed Christina as a Brown, daughter of Andrew and Mary.  But she was not.

Like Andrew’s mother Margaret, Christina’s illegitimate birth did not prevent Mary from going on to have a second marriage and additional children.  But that is Mary’s story, not Andrew’s.

In just twenty-five years, Andrew was able to experience work, marriage, and fatherhood.  I hope that he experienced joy.  I hope that he loved and was loved.

At the end of his life, Andrew left behind a widow and at least three sons.  Those three sons would go on to give him a large posterity.  The last time I counted in 2014, I knew about 169 descendants of Andrew.  As of today, I have identified 188 descendants.  There are likely many, many more, but Andrew left behind sons with the surname of Brown and tracking everyone down has not been simple.

Thank you, Andrew, for being part of my story.  And thank you for helping me find the details of your birth, childhood, and adulthood.  I felt your nudges and now your story has been told.

 

 

 

Happy Monday, I hope you make a fantastic genealogy discovery this week!  Have you considered joining the 52 Ancestors challenge?  You can learn more here.

 

 

Thankerton photo originally posted here.

 

 


  1. Scotland, “Search Old Parish Registers (OPR) Births and baptisms (1553-1854),” database, Scotlands People (http://www.scotlandspeople.gov.uk : accessed 25 May 2017), entry for Andrew Brown baptism, 21 December 1828, Wiston and Roberton Parish; citing OPR Registers no. 660/ 20 24, p. 24 of 130. 
  2. Scotland, “Search Old Parish Registers (OPR) Banns and marriages (1553-1854),” database, Scotlands People (http://www.scotlandspeople.gov.uk : accessed 25 May 2017), entry for John Baillie marriage, 17 October 1834, Wiston and Roberton Parish; citing OPR Registers no. 660/ 20 109, p. 109 of 130. 
  3. 1841 Scotland Census, Lanarkshire, Wiston and Roberton, enumeration district (ED) 1, page 14, line 920, Newton Toll, John Baillie Household; database, Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 23 January 2018); citing Original data: Scotland. 1841 Scotland Census. Reels 1-151. General Register Office for Scotland, Edinburgh, Scotland. 
  4. Scotland, “Search Old Parish Registers (OPR) Banns and marriages (1553-1854),” database, Scotlands People (http://www.scotlandspeople.gov.uk : accessed 25 May 2017), entry for Andrew Brown marriage, 15 June 1849 in Wanlockhead, Banns registered in Sanquhar Parish; citing OPR Registers no. 848/ 20 196, p. 196 of 209. 
  5. Scotland, “Search Old Parish Registers (OPR) Banns and marriages (1553-1854),” database, Scotlands People (http://www.scotlandspeople.gov.uk : accessed 23 January 2018), entry for Andrew Brown marriage, 15 June 1849, Wiston and Roberton Parish; citing OPR Registers no. 660/ 20 123, p. 123 of 130. 
  6. 1851 census of Scotland, Ayrshire, Muirkirk, 607/ 2/ 14, p. 14 of 37 (stamped), lines 4-5, Village, Mary Brown Household; image, Scotland, Scotlands People (http://www.scotlandspeople.gov.uk : accessed 23 January 2018). 
  7. 1851 census of Scotland, Ayrshire, Muirkirk, 607/ 4/ 11, p. 11 of 15, line 10, 36 Hall, Andrew Brown in Household of David M Lapraik; image, Scotland, Scotlands People (http://www.scotlandspeople.gov.uk : accessed 23 January 2018). 
  8. 1851 census of Scotland, Ayrshire, Muirkirk, 607/ 2/ 14, p. 14 of 37 (stamped), lines 4-5, Village, Mary Brown Household; image, Scotland, Scotlands People (http://www.scotlandspeople.gov.uk : accessed 23 January 2018). 
  9. Pettinain Parish (Lanarkshire, Scotland), Old Parish Registers OPR 653/1-3, p. 66, Alexander Brown baptism, 2 November 1851; FHL microfilm 1,066,603, item 3. 
  10. Scotland, “Search Old Parish Registers (OPR) Births and baptisms (1553-1854),” database, Scotlands People (http://www.scotlandspeople.gov.uk : accessed 5 November 2010), entry for Andrew Brown baptism, 6 November 1853, Covington and Thankerton Parish; citing OPR Registers no. 634/00 0020 43. 
  11. Scotland, “Search Old Parish Registers (OPR) Deaths and burials (1553-1854),” database, Scotlands People (http://www.scotlandspeople.gov.uk : accessed 14 July 2009), entry for Andrew Brown death, 26 October 1854, Covington and Thankerton Parish; citing OPR Registers no. 634/ 20 66, p. 66 of 66. 
  12. Scotland, “Statutory Births 1855-2016,” database, Scotlands People (http://www.scotlandspeople.gov.uk : accessed 14 July 2009), birth entry for Christina Green (Greenshields on image) Robertson, 12 March 1857, Pettinain in Lanark; citing Statutory Registers no. 653/ 6. 


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Tuesday’s Tip: What to do when your FS change log presents you with a tangled mess.

FS change log mess

 

This video is most applicable to FamilySearch users who participate in the Family Tree.  But it also contains some gems that may help FamilySearch users who do not participate in the tree.  Here are the items covered in this video:

  • FamilySearch watch lists.
  • The change log in FamilySearch’s Family Tree.
  • Command/Control click – which I wrote about here.
  • Reviewing record attachments in FamilySearch’s Family Tree, detaching records, changing the focus person in the attachments screen and then attaching the record to the correct person.
  • Ancestry’s FamilySearch button.  Using it to link people in your Ancestry Tree to the same individual in FamilySearch.  Using it to add someone new to the Family Tree on FamilySearch.  Using it to compare the version of a person in your Ancestry Tree with the version of a person in the Family Tree on FamilySearch, and sending data between the two websites.
  • The FamilySearch internal messaging system.  Making a plan with another user.
  • FamilySearch record hints.

 

 

Remember to click the ‘HD’ button on the bottom right of the video.

 

I went on to spend some time updating both Annas.  If you are interested in viewing each woman in the Family Tree on FamilySearch, Anna Graf can be found here, and Anna Evelyn Shoffer can be found here.

 

Confusing changes and tangled messes are part of working in the Family Tree on FamilySearch.  Frankly, that is why many genealogists stay away.  If you choose to participate the Family Tree, I hope this was helpful for you.  If it was, please feel free pass it on to other Family Tree users.

 

Happy Tuesday, I hope you don’t come across any tangled messes on your genealogy adventures today!  😉

 

 


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Tuesday’s Tip: Indexing!

Indexing!

 

In honor of FamilySearch’s worldwide indexing event this week, I am bringing you a few indexing tips.

This video is geared toward beginning indexers but it also includes a few of my personal indexing tips that would apply to anyone.

If you have never indexed, I promise it is not hard!  Give it a try.  If I haven’t convinced you yet, watch this video.

 

 

Be a Genealogy Superhero – index!

 

gg - indexing superhero - small

 

 

ps – I am having a hard time letting go of the old indexing software.  When indexing that way you ‘download’ a batch.  The new web indexing tool is great, you don’t download, but I think I said the phrase ‘download a batch’ a few times.  Sorry!  Old habits and all of that.  😉  Also, if you use the new web indexing, you can access your batches from any device and index anywhere you have internet access.  Pretty cool.

 


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Tuesday’s Tip: FamilySearch Record Hints & Ordering Sources

Tuesday's Tip

I’m starting something new around here – Tuesday’s Tip.

 

Many of you know that I volunteer once a week at my local Family History Center.  I’ve been doing that for about 5 years.  During that time I have been able to help people of varying experience and ability.  All of that one-on-one time helping different people has been very enlightening.  We all do things differently.  All of these differences have highlighted some best practices and shortcuts that I will share in short videos.

I don’t promise to post one every week.  But, probably for a while, I will.

Here are a few things you can expect from me:

  • I will try to make the title as descriptive as I can.
  • I will include video notes in each post to help you know some of the main points covered in the video.
  • I will add a few additional pieces of information relevant to the general topic.

Hopefully, this will help you know if the video is something you are interested in watching.

 

So, here is my first Tuesday’s Tip:

 

Be sure to click ‘HD’ at the bottom right of the video screen.

 

 

Video Notes:

  • Family Tree on FamilySearch has a ‘Record Hints’ section.  Only 3 hints can show in the box on a person page – there can be more in the background.  Watch to learn how to find those additional hints.
  • Learn how to review the data in a hint and determine if the hint should be attached.
  • Trying to save time?  Page load time matters, I’ll show you how to save a bit of it.
  • Sometimes hints are records about another person, like a death record for a child.  Learn how to understand these types of hints.
  • After you review and attach a record, learn how to put the sources in chronological order.

 

And a few last notes.  When dealing with record hints it is important to remember:

  • Not all record hints are accurate!
  • If there is a record image linked to the index, ALWAYS view the image before attaching the record.  Remember, the image often has more information than the index and you can usually learn new information about the person and their family.
  • If you don’t know that the record is about your person, don’t attach it.  Learn more about the person and the record and then make a decision.  If you still don’t know for sure that the record belongs to the person, leave it alone.
  • Many records in FamilySearch have been indexed more than once.  If a record is about your person, attach it!  Even if that means there will be two or three of the same record attached.  The algorithm that generates those hints is a learning algorithm.  If you tell it that it was wrong when it wasn’t, you’ve just given it bad information.  If it bothers you to have multiple versions of the same record attached, just move the duplicates to the bottom of the source list.

 

 

 


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Salt Lake Tribune Negative Collection

Utah_St__Livestock_Assn___Booth__John_E___Schramm__Clemm__Peterson__Rulon_P___Shot_4

Yesterday, while reading a post from the NGS blog, I noticed a link to a Utah photo collection that is new to me.  It’s the Salt Lake Tribune Negative Collection.  I clicked on over to check it out and discovered this cool photo of my great grandfather.

This photo was taken 1 February 1957.  These fellas were somehow connected to the Utah State Livestock Association.  My great grandpa, Rulon Powell Peterson, is on the right, holding his hat and wearing glasses.  He was a very successful cattle rancher.  The other two men are named as John E Booth and Clemm Schramm, but I don’t know which one is which.

I did a little perusing of the collection and didn’t find anything else related to my family.  The collection is hosted by Utah State History.  They have a few other collections.  If you have any Utah family, you may want to check it out.

And once again, I am so thankful that I quickly read a post listing various online collections.  You just never know what you might find in some obscure online collection.

 

Happy Thursday, I hope you make a surprisingly delightful genealogy discovery today!