thegenealogygirl


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FamilySearch Recipes

Screen Shot 2017-03-31 at 1.44.18 PM

During RootsTech, FamilySearch announced FamilySearch Recipes.  A portion of their website dedicated to preserving favorite family recipes.  What a fabulous idea!

Most of us have special recipes in our families, even if they are from the current generation.  In my family, I have a few favorite recipes that come from my Grandma.  There aren’t many, but the few I have are treasures.  I have several of my own recipes that my family LOVES.  I can’t get back the family recipes that have been lost to time, but I can be sure to preserve my own recipes for my children and the generations that will follow.

My oldest son is currently serving as a Missionary for our church.  His 19th birthday is coming up.  Missionaries don’t really need much.  They move very frequently and live out of 2 large suitcases and 1 one carry-on suitcase.  He doesn’t need more “stuff” for his birthday.  But he could probably use a little dose of home.

So, for his birthday I created him this very detailed recipe of his favorite pasta:

lemon pasta, one file-01

And because I know he will most likely lose track of his laminated recipe cards at some point in his life, I also uploaded it to FamilySearch Recipes.

I included the background of this recipe:

In 2007 I had a cardiac ablation. Afterwards I developed a blood clot in my neck. It was very painful and I lost mobility in my neck and shoulders. I was stuck resting for a few weeks. During that time our next door neighbors were doing some remodeling in their kitchen. My sweet neighbor, and very good friend – Brooke, cooked dinner in our kitchen for both of our families for many days. One day she tried a new pasta recipe. I LOVED it. I kept meaning to ask her for the recipe. I never remembered to ask. We moved away and I still thought about that yummy pasta on occasion. I decided to try to recreate it. After many revisions, this was the end result. It has become a family favorite. It is fast and easy to make, light and delicious. My oldest son especially loves this pasta dish. For his 19th birthday – his first birthday as a missionary – I created this detailed recipe for him to follow.

Not only do I love this pasta because it is delicious, but I love it because it reminds me of my very dear friend and her loving service to me and my family. As a bonus, Brooke’s husband is my husband’s 3rd cousin. A fact we discovered several months after we became neighbors.  🙂

 

I look forward to preserving additional recipes on FamilySearch Recipes.  Especially the few that come from my Grandma.  She made the best orange rolls!  That one needs to be preserved for sure.

 

Do you have any family recipes you want to preserve?

 

 


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Photograph Showcase: From an Oval Frame

DUVAL, Deane and Estelle, 2 Sep 1944

Deane & Hope Estelle Maffit Duval, 1944

MAFFIT, Estelle, 1941

Hope Estelle Maffit Duval, 1941

I found these two photos in an old oval frame at my mom’s house.  I rescued them and the frame.  My mom wants the top photo back, I think I’ll hand deliver it rather than mail it.  But that bottom photo – I think I am going to repair the oval frame and display this photo in it.  Estelle is my great grandmother.  She was likely the person who hand painted these with oil paints.  She left a wonderful legacy of photos.  I am so grateful.


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Incest?

Whiteley - Hyde

That’s a terrible title isn’t it?  But man, I don’t know what else to call it.  I’m really hoping that the records aren’t telling me what I think they are telling me.  Please, be the judge.  Find my mistakes, point them out.  Help me disprove my own position.

So here goes.

In May of 2015 I shared that diagram up there and wrote, among other things, “Sometime between the 1920 census and Robert’s death in 1928, it appears he may have married his niece Rosey Hyde – his first known marriage and her second of three.  Hmmmmm.  That is a story worthy of its own post.”

At the time that I wrote that, I was operating under one rather large assumption – that Rosey was gay.  Why did I think that?  Well, my Grandma knew Rosey.  She describes her as a gay barber.  I know that isn’t definitive, but relying on that piece of information allowed me to consider a better conclusion than incest.

So what was the conclusion I was considering when I wrote the post mentioning their possible marriage?  Because he had never married previously and she was, in my Grandma’s estimation, gay, I wondered if they legally married so that he could more easily leave his property to her.  They were both living in a country other than the ones in which they were born.  No one knew their family.  Could Uncle have married Niece for the simple purpose of keeping property in the family?

In the intervening months I have learned more about each of them.  But let’s start at the beginning.  This handwritten note is just one section of an outline created by Vera Duval in the 1960s.  Vera is my great grandaunt.  She is the daughter of Alice Hyde Duval.  She personally knew all of the people at the center of this post.  In the first section she names her aunt, Rosey as having 3 last names – Hyde, Kingham, Carlson.  In the third section she writes:

“Robert Hyde the II [Vera is only indicating that he is the second known Robert Hyde in the family, she does this often.  Robert’s parents are Henry and Sarah] – 1st husband of Rose Hyde – Born – England – Died – Vancouver, Wash. – about yr 1926 – 75 years of age – old age.  Henry – Arthur – Robert – Brothers – orig – 5 bros – Eng – Louie & John – 1 sister Letitia died at 16 – Eng…”

HYDE outline

In the entirety of this document I have so far only proven things to be correct, or very nearly correct, as I have looked for sources.  There are plenty of things that seem suspect, like the millionaire bachelor that owned diamond mines, but the things I have researched from this document have been mostly accurate with just slight variations from what Vera wrote.  When I first read the section about Robert Hyde being married to his niece Rosey I thought that I was definitely misunderstanding, that couldn’t be what Vera meant.  Here are the records I have found.

Baptism Record for Robert Hide,1862

“England Births and Christenings, 1538-1975,” database, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:NPG6-Y4W : 30 December 2014), Robert Hide, 07 Jan 1862; citing Sheffield, York, England, reference ; FHL microfilm 6,343,876, fiche 2, 1862, page 92.

Robert Hyde was born 18 July 1861 in Sheffield, Yorkshire, England to Henry Hyde and Sarah Marsden.

1871 census

1871 England Census for Household of Henry Hyde, Class: RG10; Piece: 4676; Folio: 166; Page: 32; GSU roll: 847228, http://search.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/sse.dll?indiv=1&dbid=7619&h=28376327&ssrc=pt&tid=11998768&pid=13128573021&usePUB=true

 

In 1871 Robert is found living with his parents Henry & Sarah and his siblings Ann, John, and Arthur.  His oldest brother Henry, the father of Rosey, is already out of the home.

HYDE, Rosey, 1884 Birth Record

“British Columbia Birth Registrations, 1854-1903,” database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:JDZJ-1B6 : 12 December 2014), Hyde in entry for MM9.1.1/JDZJ-1BD:, 07 Nov 1884; citing British Columbia Archives film number B13808, Vital Statistics Agency, Victoria; FHL microfilm 2,114,957.

 

This birth record is for a daughter born to Henry Hyde and Ann Whiteley on 7 November 1884 in Golden, BC.  Vera listed Rosey’s birthdate as 14 October 1883 in Golden, BC.  I can’t find a birth record that matches the date Vera gave.  Ann died 3 days after this child was born.  Henry was gone for work and came home to find his wife had given birth to a daughter and then died.  He packed up his two (possibly three) girls and went back to England.  He married his deceased wife Ann’s younger sister Alice in January of 1885.  [This union makes everything more confusing because his older daughter is also named Alice.]  He leaves Rosey with his parents in England and then Henry, Alice, and Alice head back to Canada and eventually settle in Alaska.

1891 census

1891 England Census for household of Henry Hyde, Class: RG12; Piece: 3799; Folio: 18; Page: 30; GSU roll: 6098909, http://search.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/sse.dll?indiv=1&dbid=6598&h=4645092&ssrc=pt&tid=11998768&pid=-354645760&usePUB=true

 

In 1891 Rosey can be found living with her grandparents, Henry & Sarah, in Sheffield.  Also in the household are Rosey’s Uncle Arthur and his 1st wife Mary with their daughter Ann, and Rosey’s Uncle Louis.

What follows next is a quiet period.  I know that Rosey leaves England, possibly with her Uncle Arthur as they are both found near Henry & Alice in later years.  Robert also heads west but I have not yet found any travel or immigration records for Robert, Rosey, or Arthur.  There is a 1900 Census record in Nome, Alaska for a ‘Miss Hyde’ that could be Rosey.  Unfortunately, the record only lists her name, no age or birthplace.

Rose Elvera birth

Washington State Archives; Olympia, Washington; Washington Births, 1891-1919; Film Info: Various county birth registers. Microfilm, http://search.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/sse.dll?indiv=1&dbid=1209&h=284297&ssrc=pt&tid=11998768&pid=420077563553&usePUB=true

Rose Elvera Hyde is born 6 April 1908 to Robert Hyde & Rose Hind in Clark, Washington.  As later records will prove, Rose Hind is Rosey Hyde.  No marriage record for Robert & Rosey has been found.

Rose Hyde & Harry Kingham, 1914 marriage record

“British Columbia Marriage Registrations, 1859-1932; 1937-1938,” database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:JDZN-H68 : 21 January 2016), Harry Kingham and Rosey Hyde, 19 Apr 1914; citing Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada, British Columbia Archives film number B11378, Vital Statistics Agency, Victoria; FHL microfilm 1,983,706.

 

On 19 April 1914, Rosey Hyde married Harry Kingham.  She is listed as a spinster which doesn’t jive with the note written by Vera stating that Robert was Rosey’s 1st husband.

1920 census

Year: 1920; Census Place: Bush Prairie, Clark, Washington; Roll: T625_1921; Page: 13A; Enumeration District: 4; Image: 952, http://search.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/sse.dll?indiv=1&dbid=6061&h=71185051&ssrc=pt&tid=11998768&pid=13128573021&usePUB=true

In 1920, Robert Hyde is found living in Bush Prairie, Clark, Washington with his sister-in-law Alice Whiteley Hyde.  At this point Alice has already been married to Henry & Arthur, Robert’s brothers.  On this census they are both listed as married but she is listed as his sister, not his wife.  Alice was most recently married to Arthur who died in 1919.  No marriage records have been found for Robert.

HYDE, Rose Elvera and Peter Williamson, 1927 Marriage Record

“British Columbia Marriage Registrations, 1859-1932; 1937-1938,” database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:JD8Y-NXZ : 21 January 2016), Peter Williamson and Rose Elvera Hyde, 04 Jul 1927; citing Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada, British Columbia Archives film number B13753, Vital Statistics Agency, Victoria; FHL microfilm 2,074,506.

 

On 4 July 1927, Rose Elvera Hyde married Peter Williamson in Vancouver, BC.  Importantly, she lists her parents as Robert Hyde born in England, and Rose Hyde born in Golden, BC.

HYDE, Robert, 1928 Death Record

Death certificates (Washington (State), 1907-1960 ; Index to death certificates, 1907-1979, FHL microfilm 2022474

 

 

On 8 July 1928, Robert Hyde died in Orchards, Clark, Washington.  His parents are listed as Henry Hyde & Sarah.  His birth date is listed as 7 July 1858 – which does not match our Robert.  He is listed as divorced with his former spouse being Rose (Kingham) Hyde.  The informant on the death record is Robert’s sister-in-law Alice Whiteley Hyde (Rosey’s aunt) who was living in his home in 1920.

The birth date difference gave me a glimmer of hope that maybe the Robert who married Rosey and lived with Alice was not their Uncle and brother-in-law.  I scoured FindMyPast, Ancestry, and FamilySearch looking for a Robert Hyde with the birthdate found on this death record.  But alas, the only Robert Hyde near this birth year who could match the man in this death record is the Robert Hyde born to Henry Hyde & Sarah Marsden.

Kingham, Rose & Neil Carlson, 1937 Marriage Record

Ancestry.com. Washington, Marriage Records, 1854-2013 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations, Inc., 2012., http://search.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/sse.dll?indiv=1&dbid=2378&h=4132196&ssrc=pt&tid=11998768&pid=-354645760&usePUB=true

On 27 March 1937, Rose Kingham married Neil Carlson in Whatcom, Washington.

Hyde, Rose, 1945 travel record

The National Archives at Washington, D.C.; Washington, D.C.; Manifests of Alien Arrivals at Blaine, Washington; NAI: 2675039; Record Group Title: Records of the Immigration and Naturalization Service, 1787 – 2004; Record Group Number: 85; Series Number: A3599; Roll Number: 024, http://search.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/sse.dll?indiv=1&dbid=1075&h=19553112&ssrc=pt&tid=11998768&pid=420077563553&usePUB=true

 

On 9 August 1945, Rose Elvera Hyde Williamson entered the US to visit her sister Norma ?rance who was living in Mt. Vernon, Washington.  Rose Elvera lists her birthplace as Washougall, Wash and her birthdate as April ? 1908.  Washougal is in Clark County, and her birthdate is 6 April 1908, so this is a match to her birth record.  But who is Norma?  Are they full sisters or half-sisters?  I haven’t found any other mention of Norma so far.

HYDE, Rosey, 1970 Death Record

“British Columbia Death Registrations, 1872-1986; 1992-1993”, database with images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:FLYZ-GF4 : 30 September 2015), Rosey Carlson, 1970.

 

On 1 March 1970, Rosey Carlson died in Delta, BC.  The informant is her daughter Elvera Williamson.  Rosey is listed as a widow.  Her parents are listed as Henry Hyde & Ann Whitley, both born in England.  Her birth is listed as 14 October 1883 in Golden, BC.  This birthdate matches the handwritten note by her niece Vera Duval, but not the birth record I found in 1884.  [Does this mean Henry & Ann had 3 girls, not 2?  I’m still not sure.]

So, were the Robert Hyde & Rosey Hyde, who were the parents of Rose Elvera Hyde Williamson, uncle & niece?

 

I keep reviewing the records hoping to see a different explanation.  I can’t find one.

Can you?

 

 

I hope so.

 


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Awaiting the DNA results

I have been learning about the various DNA test options for a few years now.  I finally felt confident enough to decide which tests to purchase for specific family members.  The RootsTech pricing was a great opportunity so I purchased 5 kits.

  • Ancestry kit 1 – For my Mom.  I chose this kit for two reasons – the price was $49 (regularly $99), and because her mother and brother have both previously tested with Ancestry.  This will allow me to compare their results and look for differences.
  • Ancestry kit 2 – For me.  I chose this kit for the same two reasons as I chose the kit for my Mom.
  • Ancestry kit 3 – For my friend who watched my 4 year old during the day while I was at RootsTech.  They have a juicy little mystery in their tree and they know just who to test.  🙂
  • FamilyTree DNA Y-DNA kit – For my Uncle.  His Grandpa, my great grandfather, is a brick wall.  I can’t wait for these results!  I have been trying to find a way through this wall for years.
  • FamilyTree DNA autosomal kit – For my Grandma.  She has already tested with Ancestry.  Her great grandfather was born in France and immigrated to America as a child.  He is also a brick wall.  Because more Europeans test with FT DNA, I am hoping to make some connections.  I also chose this company for her because they store the sample for 25 years.  Grandma is in her 80s, if I decide to retest her sample in the future I can (if the sample is still good).

I took my test and mailed it on Thursday of last week.  On Friday afternoon I got an email saying that my sample was received.  Wow, so fast!  Now to wait 6-8 weeks for the results.  Or longer.  They sold a lot of $49 tests at RootsTech, I’m guessing that their lab is a bit behind.

My Uncle’s test was received on March 8th.  We have another month or so to wait.  Won’t we all be surprised if he matches a different surname than we are expecting?  That is a distinct possibility.

I have mailed the other kits to my Mom and Grandma.  More waiting.  Hopefully they test and mail the samples very soon.

While I am waiting, I need to start studying the book I purchased at RootsTech that was recommended by Tom Jones.  He is basically a genius, so I followed his suggestion.

GGP

It is so exciting to begin a new genealogy journey!  I can’t wait to see what I can learn.

 

Happy Monday, I hope you make an awesome genealogy discovery today!

 


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Photograph Showcase: Grandpa at 16

PETERSON, Ronald Skeen, 16 years - smaller for FT

Ronald Skeen Peterson, 16 years old

Wasn’t my Grandpa a handsome young man?  He looks so young and yet I know his face.  I know how it will change and age.  I also see my dad and his brothers in his face.

He was such a good man.  I can see that too, even in his young 16 year old eyes.  What a treasure to find this picture recently.

 


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Family History for Little Ones

family history for little ones-01

Why do you think it’s important to share family history with children?  Why do you do it?

 

There are so many ways I can answer these two questions but the bottom line for me can be summed up pretty well in this short video of my little one:

 

 

When he was somewhere in his second year of life, he developed his first little mole on his arm.  It was really bothering him and he kept asking about it.  He was finally okay with that little mole when I told him it was an angel kiss.  From that moment on, every freckle and mole on any of us was an angel kiss.

A while later he started asking who the angel was that was kissing us.  I don’t recall our exact conversation, but the end result was that he believed that my Grandma – Margaret – was the angel that was giving us all kisses.

Whenever I can, I tell him special little things about her and my Grandpa and other family members.  I keep it very simple.  Slowly he is learning little things.  But of all those little tid-bits, the one thing that I really want him to know is that he is loved.  That he has a place in the fabric of our family.  That he is connected to those who came before and to those who will come after.

That is the part he understands completely.

In fact, he regularly says little things about the Grandma who loves him.  The one who gives him all of the angel kisses.

Those moments happen at random times.  Like when he is watching Daniel Tiger’s Neighborhood and Daniel’s little sister Margaret is mentioned.  Suddenly I hear him say, “Ooooh, she has the same name as the angel Grandma!  She loves me, doesn’t she mom.”  This sweet declaration is usually followed by a hug from my darling little boy.

Preparing my children for the things they will face throughout their lives in a daunting task.  Giving them a strong foundation when they are young makes all the difference.  I believe that one of the key ingredients for that strong foundation is knowing where they come from and who came before them.  Family History has the power to strengthen the foundation we lay for our children’s lives.

As Bruce Feiler said, “The more children knew about their family’s history, the stronger their sense of control over their lives, the higher their self-esteem and the more successfully they believed their families functioned. The “Do You Know?” scale turned out to be the best single predictor of children’s emotional health and happiness.”

I choose to share our Family’s history with my children, my nieces and nephews, and my cousin’s children whenever I can.  I do it because I know it makes them stronger and more resilient.  I do it because I want them to feel loved, not just by those they can see, but by the countless other family members who are no longer living.  I do it because it matters.

Family History is not just for old people.  Family History is for everyone – especially for children.

 

This post was written for the blog link-up Why Share Family History with Children hosted by Nicole over at The Family Locket Blog.  Thank you Nicole!

Why Share Family History with children blog link up posts

 

 

 


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Learning New Things

ELLIS, Margaret, toddler - smaller for FT

My sweet grandmother, Mary Margaret Ellis.

Last week was filled with learning new things.  On Thursday night I made my favorite discovery of the week while working at my local Family History Center.

This time of year I know that if the weather is nice we usually don’t have patrons come into the center.  Last Thursday was an especially nice day so I took a small stack of photos with me to scan.  The only patrons that came in were either attending a class or they were using one of the scanners and didn’t need assistance.  So, I spent my whole 2 hour shift scanning.

As I worked through the stack I had brought, I found a small bundle of negatives inside of a letter written to my grandmother by her older sister Beth.  I was excited to see what the photos were and held a bunch up to the light.  There were some sweet little gems in there.  As I was checking them out, a fellow consultant walked into the room and said, “You know our scanner can scan negatives don’t you?”

Well blow me down!

 

I DID NOT know that.

I got a quick lesson and proceeded to scan the stack of negatives.  Among them was this very sweet photo of my grandmother that I don’t recall having seen before.  A new treasure that I am delighted to have!

I have so many photo negatives at home.  SO. MANY.

Now that I know I can scan them at the center, I can save a bunch of pennies I was planning to spend having them professionally digitized.

But now I wonder how it would do with more modern photos?  Like the thousands of negatives I have saved from my whole life…

The lesson?

Know what resources are freely available to you.

 

I have been working at my local Family History Center for nearly 5 years.  I use the scanner all of the time and had no idea it could do this!  Such a happy discovery.

Happy Monday, I hope you make a fantastic genealogy discovery today!