thegenealogygirl


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Photograph Showcase: The Marriage That Stuck

wedding

I was 8 1/2 years old when my Grandma married my Grandpa.

The funny thing about that is until just now, I thought I was 10 when they were married.  In fact, I have said that very phrase, “I was 10 when my Grandma married my Grandpa”, over and over again.  Except that I wasn’t 10.  I was 8 1/2.

I was there when they got married on the reservation in Wellpinit, Washington.  I have a few memories of that day.  But now, I wonder how accurate those memories are.

I remember something about my Grandma needing to be adopted by a bird-clan mother so she could marry Grandpa on the res.  But is that even a thing?  A bird-clan mother?  I don’t know.

I remember my Mom making a joke that Grandma had just married her brother since they had the same bird-clan mother.  Grandma didn’t find that joke particularly amusing.  But did my Mom really make that joke to her own mother?

I remember the drums, and the jingling of bells on my Grandma’s clothing.  But as I look at the photo I don’t see any of the small metal bells I am picturing when I hear the sound in my memory.  Bells that aren’t shiny at all.  Small, handmade bells that dangle at the end of a strand of beads.  But were there really bells?

I remember playing outside under some very large pine trees.  There were pine needles and cones everywhere.  But there are pine trees everywhere in Spokane.  Did I really play under them on that day on the res?

I remember my Mom making some comment that this marriage might be the one that finally sticks.  I remember my Grandma saying something about how if you get married on the res you can’t ever divorce.  I didn’t understand why that mattered so much to my Mom that day.  I do now.

This wasn’t Grandma’s first or second marriage.  The number was higher.  But it was the first marriage during my lifetime.  It was the first time I had a Grandpa on my Mom’s side of the family.

Of course, my Mom has a father.  A father she shares with all three of her siblings.  A father who is still alive.  A father I met once when I was 16.  A father I have spoken with twice on the phone.  And while you would be accurate if you called him my grandfather, he was never my Grandpa.

But this man, the man my Grandma married on the Reservation when I was 8 1/2, he became my Grandpa.  And that, in the end, is the only memory from that day that really matters.

This was the marriage that stuck.

And I am so very glad.

 

 

ps – This photo is not the one I remember seeing of this day.  The photo my Mom has of this day is not as happy.  It’s more formal and posed.  This photo only exists on the wall of Grandma & Grandpa’s home.  During my final visit to my Grandma in the days before her death, I used the Google photoscan app to preserve a copy of this happy photo for myself.  And once again, I am so very glad.

 

 


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Tuesday’s Tip: Cleaning up Facts & Sources in an Ancestry Tree

Cleaning up Facts and Sources in an Ancestry Tree

 

Today’s tip is for anyone who uses an Ancestry tree.  When we attach sources, we generally add facts to a person’s timeline.  Sometimes we get some duplicate facts that are really about the same event.  It happens.  We can avoid that, but even if you know how to avoid it, we are human and sometimes forget.

In this quick video, I will show you a person in my Ancestry tree who had three different facts about one marriage event.  I will show you how to carefully review the sources linked to each fact, delete unnecessary facts, edit the remaining fact to reflect the event accurately, and then link all supporting sources to that one fact on the timeline.

This process is pretty fast, but it’s important because it helps tidy up a person’s timeline.  Tidy trees are easier to review.

 

 

 

Do you know how to avoid these multiple fact entries on a person’s timeline?  I’m contemplating a follow-up video on that subject…

 

 

Happy Tuesday, I hope you make a fantastic genealogy discovery today!

 

 

ps – Did you index a batch?  I just checked the stats (I’m writing this on Monday the 23rd at 11:30ish).  It says that 4,868,080 records have been indexed and there were 60,408 volunteers participating.  I hope those numbers aren’t final yet because that is less than half of last year’s event.  But let’s focus on the positive.  That is nearly 5 million more records that will be searchable for free on FamilySearch!  If you did not participate – NO GUILT!  But, even indexing 1 batch a month is an important contribution.  Consider setting a goal for yourself that is appropriate for your time.  If all genealogists gave back by indexing one batch a month just imagine what we could accomplish together!  Except you don’t have to imagine.  I’ll do that math for you.  In 2016, there were 3.45 million contributors to FamilySearch.  Multiply that by 12 – one batch per month – and you get 41.4 million records.  Pretty awesome!


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Photograph Showcase: Adorable in his Knickers

 

PETERSON, Ronald as young boy in knickers

Ronald Skeen Peterson

 

This adorable boy is my Grandpa, Ronald Skeen Peterson.  There are so many things about this photo to love – his suit, especially the knickers, his socks, the big smile, the tip of his head, the details of the curtains in the background.  It’s just a great picture that puts a smile on my face.

 

 

Happy Thursday, the FamilySearch Worldwide Indexing Event starts tomorrow!  Will you index just one batch?  Click on over and give it a try.

 


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Tuesday’s Tip: Indexing!

Indexing!

 

In honor of FamilySearch’s worldwide indexing event this week, I am bringing you a few indexing tips.

This video is geared toward beginning indexers but it also includes a few of my personal indexing tips that would apply to anyone.

If you have never indexed, I promise it is not hard!  Give it a try.  If I haven’t convinced you yet, watch this video.

 

 

Be a Genealogy Superhero – index!

 

gg - indexing superhero - small

 

 

ps – I am having a hard time letting go of the old indexing software.  When indexing that way you ‘download’ a batch.  The new web indexing tool is great, you don’t download, but I think I said the phrase ‘download a batch’ a few times.  Sorry!  Old habits and all of that.  😉  Also, if you use the new web indexing, you can access your batches from any device and index anywhere you have internet access.  Pretty cool.

 


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Worldwide Indexing Event – Will You Join Us?

 

This video gets right to the heart of what Indexers do for Researchers.

Indexers help make genealogy better.  They help make genealogy from home possible.

FamilySearch is holding another Worldwide Indexing Event this week!

 

FS indexing

 

Will you join us?

 

I hope so!

Here is my invitation to you:

 

First, if you have never indexed, visit this FamilySearch page, scroll down and click on the blue ‘Try it out!’ button on the ‘Try a Guided Tour’ section.  After you complete the tour, index one batch.

Second, if you are an avid genealogist, I invite you to reflect back on 2017.  How many major new discoveries did you make this year?  How many of those discoveries were aided by an indexed record?  I invite you to index one batch for every major discovery you made this year.  Spread your joy to other researchers by indexing!

Third, will you spread the news about the FamilySearch Worldwide Indexing Event?  You can visit this page, add your email address to be ‘counted in’, and then invite your family and friends on Facebook, Twitter, or by email simply by clicking a few links.

 

Can you imagine what we could accomplish together if we all just indexed one batch this week?

 

What discoveries have you made because of indexers?

 

Here’s one last video.  I promise, indexing is easier than you think!

 

 

Will you join the ranks of Genealogy Superheroes by indexing?

 

gg - indexing superhero - small

 


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Photograph Showcase: In Uniform

 

DUVAL, Francis Cyprien on boat

Francis Cyprien Duval, on far right

Francis Cyprien Duval is my 2nd great grandfather.  He was born 3 October 1863 in Rimouski, Québec, Canada.  He was the first in our direct line to leave Québec after settlement from France.

Francis was an adventurer.  He was in Dawson, Alaska before the Gold Rush began.  He stayed throughout and did well.  He tried his hand at homesteading in Fairbanks.  He moved his wife and children back and forth between Alaska and California for many years.

Sometime after the death of his father-in-law, Henry Hyde, in Fairbanks in 1907, Francis and his family moved to Vancouver, BC and then finally settled in Lynn Valley, BC.

He lied about his age and joined the Canadian Expeditionary Forces during WWI.  That didn’t last long before he was sent back home.

He went on to work as a Forest Ranger.  He continued in that work until the time of his death at age 55 on 31 May 1919 in Vancouver, BC.

This photo is one of very few photos of Francis.  There are no notations on the back.  Based on what I know of Francis’ life, I would guess that this was taken during his service in WWI.  I did some google searching and his hat and collar seem to match the images of the uniforms during this time.

Francis died before he was a grandfather.  I descend from his son Francis Henry Duval.  Francis Henry was the father of two children – my Grandma Deane, who recently died, and my Grand Uncle Frank.

During the last two days of my Grandma’s life, the family gathered at her side.  In my conversations with Uncle Frank, he expressed disappointment that he hadn’t thought to ask his Dad about his Grandpa.

So, Uncle Frank, this one’s for you.

 

 


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Two FamilySearch Classes this Week

FamilySearch_Logo

Sunday night I taught a class at my local Family History Center, Finding “Hidden” Records on FamilySearch.

I covered everything from this blog post and then some.  I really love teaching.  So it was a great time for me.  And bonus, my students were pretty happy too.

Well, today I get to teach a group of 10 and 11-year-old girls.  I have ten minutes.  Ten minutes is not a lot of time.  You really can’t cover a lot in ten minutes.  So I am going for quality.  We are going to talk about preserving memories.  I’ll tell them a story or two.  I’ll show them how to add a photo and an audio recording to FamilySearch from the app.  Then I am going to challenge them to go home and add 3 photos and 3 audio recordings to FamilySearch using the FS app.

I will send them home with this handout:

FS app with gg address

I hope at least one of those little girls will feel a nudge towards her ancestors.

 

Wish me luck!

 

 

ps – Those girls?  They are members of my church.  We have a program called Activity Days that is for 8-12 year old girls.  They meet twice each month and learn new things, complete service projects, or participate in some sort of activity.  I was asked to help out this time.  If you are an Activity Days Leader and come across this post, please feel free to use my handout.

 

pps – If you are interested in my overly detailed handout from my Finding “Hidden” Records on FamilySearch class, send me an email and I’ll happily share.  Email address on sidebar.